The call for restructuring of Nigeria is not a new thing. Disaffected by the annulment of Abiola’s “June 12” (1993) presidential election and overcome by a sense of siege under the brutal military dictatorship of the late General Abacha, the Yoruba became most vociferous in calling for a reordering of the polity (through the convocation of a Sovereign National Conference – SNC) with a vehemence not seen since the Igbo’s 1967 failed attempt at secession.alt

The death of Abacha in 1998 only reduced the tempo of the call, but significantly the Yoruba has remained in the vanguard of the call for a national conference (sovereign or not) for a total restructuring of the country and the control of resources by those in whose territory they belong. This, in spite the fact that the Yoruba states is not in the oil rich Niger Delta region.

Of late there’s a resurgence of clamour for “restructuring” Nigeria attaining the level of a mantra in the mouths of its increasing proponents.

But I’m shaking my head, feeling sorry for them and for Nigeria. On the scale of probability I’ll give radical restructuring of the country (the sort that would be needed to truly speed her development) a one-in-ten chance! It just won’t happen.

And what won’t make it happen is the money, ‘free’ lucre that comes from oil – Niger Delta’s oil. Oil has blocked our collective mind and filled the space in our crania meant for grey matter. The country is on the grips of powerful evil men to whom maintaining the status quo is a matter of life and death.

Oil has not been a blessing to Nigeria as it ordinarily should have been. It is a curse. It is easy to look at some structures like the Third Mainland Bridge in Lagos and the entirety of the creation of Abuja and its huge development and count them as blessings; that would be a pity for they constitute nothing but physical structures without value content to the technological mind of the citizenry or the country.

In nowhere else in the world has the money accruable from a country’s natural resources been squandered on non-regenerative projects as in Nigeria; in nowhere else in the world has so much been made and yet so little gained in the uplift of the mind of the citizenry; in nowhere else in the world has so much of a country’s resources ended up staggeringly and so fraudulently in the pockets of a few as in Nigeria. Never has so much been given to a people and yet with so little accounted for as in Nigeria!

The latest cries for “restructuring” or “reconstructing” as Prof. Charles Soludo called his own, have come from him and Mr Opeyemi Agbaje; one an economist and former Central Bank Governor, the other a financial and business consultant.

Soludo’s, not surprisingly with his pedigree, is the most eloquent, reasoned, and impassioned. But, aside missing the core issue to my economics-illiterate mind, he’s talking to the deaf; this is a country of the deaf. Agbaje, on the other hand, barely hid his frustration, if not disdain, with a section of the country he considers recalcitrant in obstructing the restructuring imperative, and calls for the big stick if need be, after all, he reasons, when they wanted Sharia, they just went ahead and had it.

The core issue to my mind, why restructuring won’t happen, is represented in the twin premise once credited to some personality from the north that the Niger Delta oil is non-negotiable Nigeria’s and that its discovery and exploitation were made possible by the now disappeared resources of the old North. Such humbug!

But I do sympathise with my northern brethren. The reality is that Niger Delta oil began to be explored and exploited in earnest by and for the Federal Government of Nigeria (even though we didn’t lift a finger nor put much of any money of our own in it) and not by a ‘Niger Delta Region’ as was the case with the produces and resources in the first republic of the more self-governing regional paradigm.

So much singsong has also been made by many “experts” about the “innumerable mineral resources” that abound in the vast expanse of land in the North waiting and crying to be tapped, and which, when tapped, has the capacity to far outstrip the resources from oil! And which, once the constraining hand of the Federal Government is removed and the free money from oil is shunned, will receive the attention due to it under a new, improved, restructured (and reconstructed) polity. O really?

I cannot see any meaningful “reconstruction” of the dysfunctional country carried out under the existing power centers and succession arrangement except through a revolution.

Something tells me we are stuck.

My brother Soludo has described our situation most succinctly, “For fear of death, Nigeria has indeed decided to commit suicide!”

If we have any sense, and if all the claim of other “untapped natural resources” be true, then the best we can do for now is to plough huge ‘Niger Delta oil money’ in exploring and exploiting them now to turn the North into a bigger foreign exchange and GDP earner than the rest of the country, including the Niger Delta. When that is done, let’s see whose voice for “restructuring” and “SNC” will be the loudest.

Until then, we are stuck – and damned!


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Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Nezie posted on 09-12-2012, 20:14:31 PM
We are not stuck; or perhaps, temporarily stuck.
But before long, at most by 2015, 'Born-To-Rule' may play another fast one on the rest of us - as in the past - collect political power and continue to hold us together with force as usual.

Agidimolaja's sermon of 'Our responsibility today is not to declare a new Republic but to free ourselves from the grip of this demonic cabal' is laughable. Who will start the collective's fight for freedom from the cabal?
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Mutti posted on 09-12-2012, 22:38:28 PM
QUOTE:
@ Mutti

No, we are not lacking in the type of people you are talking about. The sad thing is that a devilish cabal is in control of this nation. This cabal have always being in control and have manipulated this nation for selfish needs since Independence by preventing competent people from leading the country and turn the country around for good.
Our responsibility today is not to declare a new Republic but to free ourselves from the grip of this demonic cabal.
Trust me,if you have general knowledge of we the people of Nigeria,you would see it with your own eyes that we have talented people scattered all over the land among various ethnic groups. I mean very competent people who are ready to make the sacrifice.
It is very sad and so disturbing that such people,since Independence have not been allowed to lead this country hence we are where we are today.


Handsome, they say, is as handsome does. I wonder why 'good people' always wait to be 'allowed' to do?
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Agidimolaja posted on 09-13-2012, 00:20:37 AM
@ Anioma777



The truth is this; all that MEND is capable of doing is sneak fight or what America called "cut and run".

All that they have been doing is cause some destruction one at a time and cowardly take innocent folks as hostage.

Trust me, those violent buffoons have no single gut to declare any kind of quasi Republic.Ga fili ga doki.Let them try it.

Igbos are not laughing at last after that shameful defeat of their Biafra.Igbos are now crying so loudly to become the President of Nigeria. Is that what you call laugh at last? Even Emeka before he died, he was a Nigerian Senator and later he aspired to become the President of the same Nigeria he hadwanted to tear apart.Is that what you see as Igbos laugh atlast?

Igbos are still crowing about what they called "marginalization of Igbos" even though it is not true that Igbos have at any time been marginalized since after the end of the civil war.But is their crying of marginalization according to you a kind of laughing at last?

Maybe you should give us the definition of your laughing at last.

Nigerians are not really scared of dying but many people are yet to see what is worth dying for anyway.Who wants to die for ungrateful country?
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Agidimolaja posted on 09-13-2012, 00:46:15 AM
@ Mutti



Your response set you out as someone who is not in touch with reality and who isso deficient in Nigeria's history and current affairs.

When was it that good people in Nigeria's politics "waited to be "allowed"?

And if I may asked you, "allowed" to do what?

I wondered{in vain} if you ever heard about a good man called Obafemi Awolowo.He did not wait to be allowed. He tried his possible best to become the Prime Minister/President of this country on few instances but the cabal would not let him.

Does the name Pat Utomi ring bell in your ears? He is a good man. He did not fold his arms but tried his best to govern this country.Mutti, did you and the people of your community support him or voted for him then?

Gani Fawehinmi before he died was a good man. He also tried to govern this country, Mutti, did you and the people of your area vote for him? So what are you talking about thatsaying "why do good people wait to be allowed"? Bunch of useless rubbish!

Dr.Steve Ugbah left his gainful employment here in USA and came to his State of Benue to govern his people rightly. What happened? His mandate was stolen.Dr.Steve Ugbah is a good man and did not wait to be "allowed".

Are you not a good person? Then what are you waiting for? You too can bring about the change we badly needed in Nigeria.Are you also not waiting to be "allowed"?
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Agidimolaja posted on 09-13-2012, 00:54:10 AM
@ Nezie



Please come to reality, we are stuck.Oh, did I hear you say"at least as at now"-temporarily.Yes, temporarily sir.

Your question about what you regarded as my sermon is, who will bell the cat.

My answer is, evil will not continue forever on the land. It is a matter of time.
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Obugi posted on 09-13-2012, 00:55:57 AM
Agidimolaja,

QUOTE:
Who wants to die for ungrateful country?


Those who fought for the Nigerian Army certainly wanted to die for Nigeria.

!Get Yours!
Obugi
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Anioma777 posted on 09-13-2012, 01:54:38 AM
@Agidimolaja

QUOTE:
he was a Nigerian Senator and later he aspired to become the President of the same Nigeria he had wanted to tear apart. Is that what you see as Igbos laugh at last?


Well most of the Igbos I know, I cannot speak for ALL to be honest don't really care about Igbo Presidency. Their primary focus is their business, work and family and some now coming to the realization about not putting ALL their eggs in other people's basket ( region ). So that is just one aspect of what I mean by Igbos are laughing. Again the war of weapons was won by Nigeria albeit it took them 3 years with numerical and weapons over whelming advantage, then trow in British Naval blockade, Russian, Egyptian help to overrun Biafra with about 75% of its army and infantry wiped out in the away match of summer 1966. Ndi Igbos tried.

QUOTE:
Who wants to die for ungrateful country?


You see it. You fought for Nigeria then, now you are saying we are stuck. Many never fought for Nigeria out of love it was out of let us teach those uppity Igbos a lesson and wipe them out. So Igbos have fought ( war or survival ) let others fight the good fight. So once again another reason why I say Igbos are having the last laugh. It has taken other Nigerians the best part of 40 plus years to suddenly stop deluding themselves and see what Nigeria really is made of. Most want out but yet don't want to fight for it. Talking is good and if things can be done peacefully great, but the usual my tribe is better than yours syndrome and trying to pull a fast one ultimately rears its ugly head and let us not forget our over the top egos just to spice things up. The Cabal which cuts across all groups are the real enemies of Nigeria because they are enjoying why the rest of us are here beating our tribal drums. The Arab spring and the vast majority of nations in the world have shown that to achieve any kind of lasting peace many will have to sign with red pen. I wonder what the ethnic make up of the military is now. In particular the army. I think will need to have some say. Interesting times...but who knows in 50 years time we may still be talking about we are stuck.

Agidimolaja do you offer military training
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Ewuro posted on 09-13-2012, 06:48:59 AM
Anioma777,
One of the evidences that Igbo are hurting is you. You cry every day on this forum for Igbo.
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Anioma777 posted on 09-13-2012, 08:45:59 AM
@Ewuro

QUOTE:
Anioma777,
One of the evidences that Igbo are hurting is you. You cry every day on this forum for Igbo.


I will start crying for Libya soon......

Well I do not represent ALL Igbo. Don't confuse stating what is right and the truth with hurting. If we take a quick example the 2015 Igbo Presidency situation you will not find a single post from me agitating or even enthusiastic about it. Some Igbos I have even mentioned the topic in passing when I was in Nigeria are genuinely not bothered. I will rather I have Igbo areas become economically stronger and many get back to their hey days and to a larger extent other pasts of Nigeria too. That is why I am not really in favour of this Federalism approach because if MOST of the governors of the 36 states were serious and genuine they should work with their administration team to make their states more economically sound. Human resources when harnessed can out perform places with abundant natural resources, but like most things Nigerian we like the easy route. Unfortunately the get rich quicK, chop and quench mentality is so deeply entrenched in our DNA it will take a while to change. Question is do we have the patience? The author should have had this title instead: I think We're Stuck Because We Find It Convenient To Be Stuck.
Re: I Think We're Stuck!
Mutti posted on 09-13-2012, 09:09:14 AM
Which is why we have such as you to provide me with an education. Still your lesson here is still all about 'good people' (and your examples are telling) waiting to be allowed to do.

QUOTE:
@ Mutti

Your response set you out as someone who is not in touch with reality and who is so deficient in Nigeria's history and current affairs.
When was it that good people in Nigeria's politics \"waited to be \"allowed\"?
And if I may asked you,\"allowed\" to do what?
I wondered{in vain} if you ever heard about a good man called Obafemi Awolowo. He did not wait to be allowed.He tried his possible best to become the Prime Minister/President of this country on few instances but the cabal would not let him.
Does the name Pat Utomi ring bell in your ears? He is a good man.He did not fold his arms but tried his best to govern this country. Mutti,did you and the people of your community support him or voted for him then?
Gani Fawehinmi before he died was a good man.He also tried to govern this country, Mutti,did you and the people of your area vote for him? So what are you talking about that saying \"why do good people wait to be allowed\"? Bunch of useless rubbish!
Dr. Steve Ugbah left his gainful employment here in USA and came to his State of Benue to govern his people rightly.What happened? His mandate was stolen. Dr. Steve Ugbah is a good man and did not wait to be \"allowed\".
Are you not a good person? Then what are you waiting for? You too can bring about the change we badly needed in Nigeria. Are you also not waiting to be \"allowed\"?
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