Making Statesmen of Villains

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StandPoint

Making Statesmen of Villains


February 7, 2011

The StandPoint condemns the appointment of Equatorial Guinea's President Teodoro Obiang Nguema as the new chairperson of the African Union (AU) and the appointment of President Blaise Compaoré of Burkina Faso as the new lead negotiator in the Ivoirian political crisis. One of the objectives that the AU upholds is the promotion of democratic principles and institutions, popular participation and good governance. The appalling appointment of these two sit-tight rulers at a time of world-wide clamor for democratic reform is a clear contravention of this objective.

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Blaise Compaoré, president of Burkina Faso since 1987, was appointed to replace President Goodluck Jonathan who resigned to focus on the successful execution of the April elections in Nigeria. Mr. Compaoré 's questionable role in the Ivorien crises since 2004, his 24-year misrule of Burkina Faso, his deep role in the Mano River civil wars (Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea) and, worse, the manner of his ascension to his country's leadership, are enough grounds to disqualify him from the role of the AU's ambassador of peace. A stooge of France, a nation whose complicity in the present quagmire in Cote d'Ivoire is well known, Mr. Compaoré and his French paymasters have been accused of masterminding the assassination of Thomas Sankara, and 13 other progressive leaders in Ouagadougou in 1987.

Mr. Sankara incurred the wrath of the former French colonial powers for daring to criticize their continuing meddling in the affairs of his country, thus leaving Burkinabe citizens in miserable poverty. After becoming his nation's leader, Mr. Sankara embarked on mass literacy campaigns, comprehensive rural health care programs and debt reduction strategies for the country he renamed Burkina Faso, "the land of people of integrity". The very first African head of state to advocate for gender equality, Mr. Sankara appointed five women into ministerial posts. Despite Mr. Sankara's manifold and transforming achievements, his deputy, Mr. Compaoré, vilified him as a traitor and buried him in an unmarked grave. Once in the saddle, Mr. Compaoré reversed his admirable predecessor's progressive policies and turned the State House into his private estate.

Mr. Compaoré therefore has a case to answer for his massive mismanagement of his country's resources and his nefarious role in the death of one of the greatest leaders contemporary Africa has ever produced.

It is also surprising that the AU has appointed Obiang Nguema to be the next chairman amid escalating governance problems on the continent. Obiang Nguema has been in power since 1979 after deposing and executing his uncle Francisco Macias. Since then, Obiang's regime has retained clear authoritarian and brutal characteristics. His regime is now considered to be one of the most corrupt, ethnocentric, oppressive and undemocratic states in the world. Equatorial Guinea is now essentially a single-party state; the constitution grants Obiang wide powers, including the power to rule by decree. The opposition is severely hampered by the lack of a free press since the entire broadcast media are either owned outright or controlled by the government. Abuses under Obiang have included "unlawful killings by security forces; government-sanctioned kidnappings; systematic torture of prisoners and detainees by security forces; life threatening conditions in prisons and detention facilities; impunity; arbitrary arrest, detention, and incommunicado detention." Forbes magazine has said that Obiang is one of the wealthiest heads of state in the world, with a net worth of 600 million dollars. In view of these, what moral background does Obiang have when dealing with the increasing clamor for democratic reforms in places like Egypt, Tunisia, Sudan and other African countries?

It is the view of the StandPoint that Mr. Compaoré and Mr Nguema and their ilk are not fit to hold any leadership position within the continental body of the AU. The AU should endeavor to appoint leaders with credibility and a good track record in matters of governance. Unless Africans begin to hold their leaders accountable, the tragic events Mr. Compaoré precipitated in Equatorial Guinea and Burkina Faso could become the norm in Africa

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The StandPoint is the consensual position of the NVS editorial board.



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Re: Making Statesmen of Villains
Iyke posted on 02-07-2011, 19:28:26 PM
Somebody should call ICC, Charles Taylor is lacking a companion
Re: Making Statesmen of Villains
Century posted on 02-07-2011, 20:07:19 PM
Laurent Gbagbo must be feeling real cool... His friends are just in the right places! Alassane Ouatarra should perish the thought of reclaiming his presidency with these characters in charge!
Making Statesmen of Villains
The NVS StandPoint posted on 02-07-2011, 23:40:59 PM
alt

StandPoint

Making Statesmen of Villains


February 7, 2011The StandPoint condemns the appointment of Equatorial Guinea's President Teodoro Obiang Nguema as the new chairperson of the African Union (AU) and the appointment of President Blaise Compaoré of Burkina Faso as the new lead negotiator in the Ivoirian political crisis. One of the objectives that the AU upholds is the promotion of democratic principles and institutions, popular participation and good governance. The appalling appointment of these two sit-tight rulers at a time of world-wide clamor for democratic reform is a clear contravention of this objective.

alt

Blaise Compaoré, president of Burkina Faso since 1987, was appointed to replace President Goodluck Jonathan who resigned to focus on the successful execution of the April elections in Nigeria. Mr. Compaoré 's questionable role in the Ivorien crises since 2004, his 24-year misrule of Burkina Faso, his deep role in the Mano River civil wars (Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea) and, worse, the manner of his ascension to his country's leadership, are enough grounds to disqualify him from the role of the AU's ambassador of peace. A stooge of France, a nation whose complicity in the present quagmire in Cote d'Ivoire is well known, Mr. Compaoré and his French paymasters have been accused of masterminding the assassination of Thomas Sankara, and 13 other progressive leaders in Ouagadougou in 1987.

Mr. Sankara incurred the wrath of the former French colonial powers for daring to criticize their continuing meddling in the affairs of his country, thus leaving Burkinabe citizens in miserable poverty. After becoming his nation's leader, Mr. Sankara embarked on mass literacy campaigns, comprehensive rural health care programs and debt reduction strategies for the country he renamed Burkina Faso, "the land of people of integrity". The very first African head of state to advocate for gender equality, Mr. Sankara appointed five women into ministerial posts. Despite Mr. Sankara's manifold and transforming achievements, his deputy, Mr. Compaoré, vilified him as a traitor and buried him in an unmarked grave. Once in the saddle, Mr. Compaoré reversed his admirable predecessor's progressive policies and turned the State House into his private estate.

alt

Mr. Compaoré therefore has a case to answer for his massive mismanagement of his country's resources and his nefarious role in the death of one of the greatest leaders contemporary Africa has ever produced.

It is also surprising that the AU has appointed Obiang Nguema to be the next chairman amid escalating governance problems on the continent. Obiang Nguema has been in power since 1979 after deposing and executing his uncle Francisco Macias. Since then, Obiang's regime has retained clear authoritarian and brutal characteristics. His regime is now considered to be one of the most corrupt, ethnocentric, oppressive and undemocratic states in the world. Equatorial Guinea is now essentially a single-party state, the constitution grants Obiang wide powers, including the power to rule by decree. The opposition is severely hampered by the lack of a free press since the entire broadcast media are either owned outright or controlled by the government. Abuses under Obiang have included "unlawful killings by security forces; government-sanctioned kidnappings; systematic torture of prisoners and detainees by security forces; life threatening conditions in prisons and detention facilities; impunity; arbitrary arrest, detention, and incommunicado detention." Forbes magazine has said that Obiang is one of the wealthiest heads of state in the world, with a net worth of 600 million dollars. altIn view of these, what moral background Obiang have when deal with increasing clamor for democratic reforms in places like Egypt, Tunisia, Sudan and other African countries?

In the view of the StandPoint, that Mr. Compaoré and Mr Nguema and their type are not fit to hold any leadership position within the continental body of the AU. The AU should endeavor to appoint leaders with credibility and a good track record in matters of governance. Unless Africans begin to hold their leaders accountable, the tragic events Mr. Compaoré precipitated in Equatorial Guinea and Burkina Faso could become the norm in Africa

________________

The StandPoint is the consensual position of the NVS editorial board.




Read full article
Re: Making Statesmen of Villains
Prof penkelemess posted on 02-07-2011, 23:40:59 PM
alt

StandPoint


Making Statesmen of Villains




February 7, 2011

The StandPoint condemns the appointment of Equatorial Guinea's President Teodoro Obiang Nguema as the new chairperson of the African Union (AU) and the appointment of President Blaise Compaoré of Burkina Faso as the new lead negotiator in the Ivoirian political crisis. One of the objectives that the AU upholds is the promotion of democratic principles and institutions, popular participation and good governance. The appalling appointment of these two sit-tight rulers at a time of world-wide clamor for democratic reform is a clear contravention of this objective.

alt


Blaise Compaoré, president of Burkina Faso since 1987, was appointed to replace President Goodluck Jonathan who resigned to focus on the successful execution of the April elections in Nigeria. Mr. Compaoré 's questionable role in the Ivorien crises since 2004, his 24-year misrule of Burkina Faso, his deep role in the Mano River civil wars (Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea) and, worse, the manner of his ascension to his country's leadership, are enough grounds to disqualify him from the role of the AU's ambassador of peace. A stooge of France, a nation whose complicity in the present quagmire in Cote d'Ivoire is well known, Mr. Compaoré and his French paymasters have been accused of masterminding the assassination of Thomas Sankara, and 13 other progressive leaders in Ouagadougou in 1987.


Mr. Sankara incurred the wrath of the former French colonial powers for daring to criticize their continuing meddling in the affairs of his country, thus leaving Burkinabe citizens in miserable poverty. After becoming his nation's leader, Mr. Sankara embarked on mass literacy campaigns, comprehensive rural health care programs and debt reduction strategies for the country he renamed Burkina Faso, "the land of people of integrity". The very first African head of state to advocate for gender equality, Mr. Sankara appointed five women into ministerial posts. Despite Mr. Sankara's manifold and transforming achievements, his deputy, Mr. Compaoré, vilified him as a traitor and buried him in an unmarked grave. Once in the saddle, Mr. Compaoré reversed his admirable predecessor's progressive policies and turned the State House into his private estate.



Mr. Compaoré therefore has a case to answer for his massive mismanagement of his country's resources and his nefarious role in the death of one of the greatest leaders contemporary Africa has ever produced.


It is also surprising that the AU has appointed Obiang Nguema to be the next chairman amid escalating governance problems on the continent. Obiang Nguema has been in power since 1979 after deposing and executing his uncle Francisco Macias. Since then, Obiang's regime has retained clear authoritarian and brutal characteristics. His regime is now considered to be one of the most corrupt, ethnocentric, oppressive and undemocratic states in the world. Equatorial Guinea is now essentially a single-party state; the constitution grants Obiang wide powers, including the power to rule by decree. The opposition is severely hampered by the lack of a free press since the entire broadcast media are either owned outright or controlled by the government. Abuses under Obiang have included "unlawful killings by security forces; government-sanctioned kidnappings; systematic torture of prisoners and detainees by security forces; life threatening conditions in prisons and detention facilities; impunity; arbitrary arrest, detention, and incommunicado detention." Forbes magazine has said that Obiang is one of the wealthiest heads of state in the world, with a net worth of 600 million dollars. altIn view of these, what moral background does Obiang have when dealing with the increasing clamor for democratic reforms in places like Egypt, Tunisia, Sudan and other African countries?


It is the view of the StandPoint that Mr. Compaoré and Mr Nguema and their ilk are not fit to hold any leadership position within the continental body of the AU. The AU should endeavor to appoint leaders with credibility and a good track record in matters of governance. Unless Africans begin to hold their leaders accountable, the tragic events Mr. Compaoré precipitated in Equatorial Guinea and Burkina Faso could become the norm in Africa

________________


The StandPoint is the consensual position of the NVS editorial board.




..Read the full article
Re: Making Statesmen of Villains
Prof penkelemess posted on 02-08-2011, 02:36:02 AM
Century,

you didnt read me on that other thread!!!

he has a double offer:

1 one from Gary B and his 'national airlines', and

2 from Hosni M to join him on a flight to Baden-Baden,

and I even explained to you where that is.

It is farf and safely away from Ch. taylor#s present abode.

Thank you for reading me proper in future

The strict Prof
Re: Making Statesmen of Villains
Prof penkelemess posted on 02-09-2011, 16:09:46 PM
to ALL:

how come that so many pipul react to those Nafata and Adeniran idiocies (sorry for CIVILOGUE, but then ADMIN, Big-K and Moderator seem to have gone on leave...)

when the STANDPOINT is speaking about the REAL issues !!!

can somebori, please, get ADMIN, BIG-K, Moderator and even...

I am NOT mentioning any real NVS names

to AT LONG LAST stop this inflammatory NONESENSE!!!

can we stop it: PLEASE !

gerd meuer - full name
Re: Making Statesmen of Villains
Count1 posted on 04-26-2011, 02:38:26 AM
AU should invite Ghadda..Quadda...Khadda.... you know who I mean, to be the Life Chairman of the AU as a soft landing.
Re: Making Statesmen of Villains
Emj posted on 04-26-2011, 10:12:19 AM
QUOTE:
AU should invite Ghadda..Quadda...Khadda.... you know who I mean, to be the Life Chairman of the AU as a soft landing.


Why should that clown be given a sift landing?

QUOTE:
In the view of the StandPoint, that Mr. Compaoré and Mr Nguema and their type are not fit to hold any leadership position within the continental body of the AU. The AU should endeavor to appoint leaders with credibility and a good track record in matters of governance. Unless Africans begin to hold their leaders accountable, the tragic events Mr. Compaoré precipitated in Equatorial Guinea and Burkina Faso could become the norm in Africa
________________


We need a Tulip Revolution in West Africa..................
Re: Making Statesmen of Villains
Ocnus posted on 07-04-2011, 10:36:30 AM
What you left out is that Blaise Campaore is a certified war criminal. He not only has served as the main French and Libyan distributor of arms throughoy=t the Mani=o Union States but is intimately involved in the sale of drugs and diamonds to Al Qaida.

During the civil wars in Sierra Leone the Revolutionary United Front (‘RUF') took over the diamond fields in the country; initially at Kono. The diamonds were mined by RUF rebels, who became infamous during Sierra Leone's civil war for hacking off the arms and legs of civilians and abducting thousands of children and forcing them to fight as combatants. The country's alluvial diamond fields, some of the richest in the world, were the principal prize in the civil war, and they have been under RUF control for the past four years.[ii] Small packets of diamonds, often wrapped in rags or plastic sheets, were taken by senior RUF commanders across the porous Liberian border to Monrovia, where they were exchanged for briefcases of cash brought by diamond dealers who flew several times a month from Belgium to Monrovia, returning to Pelikaanstraat in Antwerp.

The man in charge was by Ibrahim Bah, a Libyan-trained former Senegalese rebel and the RUF's principal diamond dealer. After fighting with the Casamance separatist movement in Senegal in the 1970s, Bah trained in Libya under the protection of Col. Moammar Gaddafi. He spent several years in the early 1980s fighting alongside Muslim guerrillas against Soviet forces in Afghanistan where he participated in the creation of Al Qaida. He then left to fight alongside Hezbollah in Lebanon. He returned to West Africa, to Ouagadougou, where he is sheltered and protected by the President, Blaise Campaore. Campaore was already using Burkina Faso as a depot for arms to the RUF, Liberia and the rebels of the Ivory Coast. He took, and takes, his share of the blood diamond money whether they are sold to Al Qaida or Hezbollah.

The involvement of principal figures of Al Qaida in the brood diamond business is well documented The Al Qaida and Hezbollah involvement in the illegal trade in diamonds, gold and other gemstones has tied in organised criminal activities with Islamic fundamentalism in the region, provoking a clash between the Islamists and the Christian/Animists. It has sparked civil unrest, as with Boku Haram in Nigeria and created a criminal enterprise which has taken over the Ivory Coast.

With the French-inspired and funded rebellion against the government of Gbagbo in 2001 the country was divided. The legitimate government of Gbagbo ruled in the South but the country was divided by a military line provided by the French Force Licorne and the United Nations peacekeepers. The North was free and protected to get on with its own businesses. It was run by tin pot warlords who drew their strength from their marauding bands of mercenaries, misfits and sociophobes who created little kingdoms of their own which they ran win rapacious style. They paid no taxes, they paid no rents; they paid no duties and they provided no social services. They stole everything they could find and shipped it out, usually via their home base in Burkina Faso.

In Burkina Faso, under the aegis of Blaise Campaore, they were introduced to the buyers from Hezbollah and Al Qaida. Ivory Coast has diamond mines. Illicit diamond mining in the northern part of Ivory Coast still continues and provides a healthy stream of diamonds to Al Qaida, especially Al Qaida in Islamic Maghreb (AQIM).

There are four big mines - Bobi, Diarabala, Seguela and Tortiya. The US sent a CIA team in to discover what was happening, now that Ouattara is notionally President. They attempted to trace the origin of around 300,000 carats produced locally last year and which generated earnings of roughly USD 25 million. The business is mainly controlled by two warlords, Issiaka Ouattara AKA "Wattao" and Herve Toure AKA "Vetcho." The diamonds are smuggled out mainly through Mali and Guinea before ending up on the international market in Tel Aviv. These warlords are the backbone of the new Ivory Coast Army and tied closely to the Prime Minister, Soro. With the support of Campaore and the needs of the new Army it is very unlikely that Soro will heed the call of his feeble President to stop the sale of blood diamonds to Al Qaida or to stop paying Campaore.
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