Jonathan And The London Olympics

It is no longer enough to participate in the Olympics. Nations go to the Olympics to win medals, because an Olympic victory is an effective vehicle of national rebranding and assertion. The Jamaicans have Usain Bolt. They beat the Americans in the 4x100 men’s relay. They won 4 gold medals, broke two world records, and grabbed a total of 12 medals.

alt

All that raised the level of Jamaican patriotism a few more notches. It was a case of a country re-affirming its confidence in its ability to impress the world. The Americans, forever sure of their own supremacy, were again excited by their dominance at the London 2012 Olympics.

They came first with the largest collection of individual heroes: Michael Phelps, Missy Franklin, Gabrielle Douglas, Serena Williams and more. China again wrote its name in gold.

Britain, good old Britain, almost a second or third fiddle or a non-starter in many of the games that it gave to the world, this time around, showed up on the final medals table in the third position, with many of its athletes including Andy Murray, and Jessica Ennis, posting historic feats. Andy Murray who lost to Roger Federer only a few weeks earlier at the Wimbledon Finals, took the shine off the world’s greatest tennis player convincingly.

The London Olympiad brought Britain clear intimations, and affirmations of glory, not just on the field, but also in the overwhelming applause that its organization of the events attracted worldwide. The games are over, now. Jamaicans are walking tall. Grenada, (pop., 105,000) is celebrating its single 400m gold medal. The nations that won nothing are ashamed. In 1996, Nigerians remained awake as the country’s football team won gold, and Chioma Ajunwa took a long jump gold at the Atlanta Olympics. It was an unforgettably fine moment.

In 2008, Nigerians again found cause for cheer with four medals in Beijing. In 2012, we have returned empty-handed, and with jeremiads by the Sports Minister, the National Sports Commission, athletes, and an angry commentariat.

President Jonathan was angry too, I can report. On Wednesday, August 15, council meeting had just ended, and it was time for AOB. Something about setting up a committee to prepare the White Paper ASAP, on the report of the Presidential Committee on Police Reform and the volunteered, additional report on police reform by the Retired Inspectors General of Police Forum. Everyone was in a relaxed mood, until the President said he was surprised that the Minister of Sports had not briefed Council about the outcome of the London Olympics.

“You are taking your time eh”, he said jokingly. “Okay, don’t worry, we understand.”Peals of laughter. Then, the President’s tone changed.

“How can we possibly go to the Olympics and come back with nothing?,” he asked rhetorically. “Four years ago, we did better. It is something that we have to address. Nigeria is a country of talented people. We must identify those talents, all over Nigeria, and begin to train them for the next major sporting tournament. This idea of starting preparations at the last minute and achieving nothing must stop. We must get the private sector to invest in sports and governments at all levels must also do their bit. We are a country of gifted people. We must identify those areas in which this country can excel and work hard at them. We must win medals and bring glory to our nation.

“And I don’t mean going to the bus stop to recruit athletes. I mean serious business. We must get our acts together.

“I remember one man who won an Olympic gold medal in the past. A Nigerian!. When the medal was announced, they said it belonged to Canada, because the fellow was representing Canada. We have to address that too,” he said.

The Minister of Sports raised his hand. The President acknowledged him.

“Minister, I have provoked you to say something at last. Okay, go ahead.”

The Sports Minister thanked Mr. President for his concern, and the interest that Team Nigeria’s performance had provoked with a pledge that his Ministry was prepared to do everything possible to address observed lapses.

The President’s clear message was that winning glory for the nation through sports is not always about finance and money alone. It is also about higher values, commitment, patriotism and the determination to excel by all persons and at all levels.

“I watch these things on television. I listen to the commentaries. We have to take the matter seriously,” said Mr. President.

A keen sportsman, himself, he understands the transformative power of sports: its psychological impact, its physical value, and its economic potential, its political strength and its ultimate relevance as a tool of international relations and diplomacy. At least twice a week, President Jonathan plays squash. I have watched him play at the State House Squash court, and in Government House, Yenagoa. He also plays table tennis. Each time he picks up the racket or the tennis bat, he tells his opponents. “You play your game. Don’t say because I am President I must win. Just play a normal game.” And he goes into the match, a completely different man, sweating for victory. And the aides who take up the challenge, actually play hard and ferociously as if they had been sent by the ACN or CPC. But it never matters. The President is a sportsman. Gracious in victory, magnanimous in defeat.

A compulsive reviewer of situations, after every event, every trip, he wants a post-mortem. He wants serious criticism and honest ideas. And he keeps warning:“don’t tell me what you think I want to hear. That is not the purpose of this meeting. I want us to move this country forward.”

If there is any lesson arising from Nigeria’s performance in the 2012 Olympics, it is that certain issues must be addressed. In Nigeria, excellent performance in sports is perhaps the strongest symbol of unity. Nigerians love sports. They enjoy victory. They crave it. When their country fails, the people mourn. The situation calls for leadership.

Faced with our performance in London, President Jonathan believes that it is time to have a comprehensive rethink of sports administration in Nigeria with a view to working out a clear and implementable strategy for returning Nigerian sportsmen and women to winning ways.

As one who sees him up close and personal each day, I know the President will insist on a thorough review of our entire sports architecture. He will get all critical stakeholders and actors to sit together to identify what went wrong and the best way forward. If it means revisiting the past and reviving the culture of the private sector sponsoring yearly athletic meets like the Mobil Open and such like, then we must revive that. If it takes a reinvigoration of the Inter-House sports tradition in our secondary schools then it will be done. If it means developing sports academies in every state, then that must be undertaken.

But certainly, what Nigeria must do is to properly utilize her sporting assets. Many sportsmen and women of Nigerian origin won medals for various nations including the U.S, U.K and Canada to mention a few. What makes them choose to fly another nation's colours? Is it remuneration? Is it alienation from Nigeria? Whatever it is must be identified and addressed.

These and other steps I see the President taking.

President Jonathan is determined to transform the country’s sports sector. That is one silver lining to the clouds of Nigeria’s Olympic 2012 defeat. What he requires, however, is not the cynicism of the commentariat, not the brittleness of the nay-saying absolutists, not the one track-mindedness of the opposition, not the hypocrisy of sports bureaucrats, rather a national team spirit –that same spirit that propelled Nigeria to its Olympic glory in 1996 and the Flying Eagles to the miracle of Damman in 1989. What this moment requires is not rhetoric, but action.

Fittingly, when the Minister of Information went ahead to brief the press about Council’s deliberations, the Sports Minister was not with him as convention requires. He had gone ahead as directed to begin the process of change in the sports sector.

Dr. Abati is the Special Adviser (Media and Publicity), to President Jonathan



1 2 3 4
Re: Jonathan And The London Olympics
Justan234 posted on 08-19-2012, 10:34:08 AM
QUOTE:
\"I remember one man who won an Olympic gold medal in the past. A Nigerian!. When the medal was announced, they said it belonged to Canada, because the fellow was representing Canada. We have to address that too,\" he said.


Na today? Wen una dey donate your children to other nations and your genes to other races, you expect those same children/descendants/genes to claim to know you. We've basically told them to avoid "our people" because we have "nothing to offer". How do you expect these same progeny to turn around and want to be associated with "us"? We really are a delusional bunch.....
Re: Jonathan And The London Olympics
Emj posted on 08-19-2012, 11:24:04 AM
QUOTE:
Na today? Wen una dey donate your children to other nations and your genes to other races, you expect those same children/descendants/genes to claim to know you. We've basically told them to avoid \"our people\" because we have \"nothing to offer\". How do you expect these same progeny to turn around and want to be associated with \"us\"? We really are a delusional bunch.....


Gbam. Justan ......
Re: Jonathan And The London Olympics
Eja posted on 08-19-2012, 12:23:16 PM
QUOTE:
A keen sportsman, himself, ..... The President is a sportsman..


[ATTACH=CONFIG]3965[/ATTACH]

And he looks it.
Re: [Column] Jonathan And The London Olympics
Eja posted on 08-19-2012, 12:34:22 PM
My word for today : Hagiography

Meaning - a biography that idealizes or idolizes the person (especially a person who is a saint).

As we say in Lome, regardez :

QUOTE:
A keen sportsman, himself, he understands the transformative power of sports: its psychological impact, its physical value, and its economic potential, its political strength and its ultimate relevance as a tool of international relations and diplomacy. At least twice a week, President Jonathan plays squash. I have watched him play at the State House Squash court, and in Government House, Yenagoa. He also plays table tennis. Each time he picks up the racket or the tennis bat, he tells his opponents. \"You play your game. Don't say because I am President I must win. Just play a normal game.\" And he goes into the match, a completely different man, sweating for victory. And the aides who take up the challenge, actually play hard and ferociously as if they had been sent by the ACN or CPC. But it never matters. The President is a sportsman. Gracious in victory, magnanimous in defeat.

Dr. Abati is the Special Adviser (Media and Publicity), to President Jonathan

Read full article


A keen sportsman....yes indeed. It shows....

[ATTACH=CONFIG]3967[/ATTACH]
Re: Jonathan And The London Olympics
Igboamaeze posted on 08-19-2012, 12:45:39 PM
-------

I've always known that no one ever goes to Abuja and remains the same. But I never imagined that Abati would go this far.

Now, that's transformation...
Re: Jonathan And The London Olympics
Enyi posted on 08-19-2012, 13:33:54 PM
QUOTE:
-------

I've always known that no one ever goes to Abuja and remains the same. But I never imagined that Abati would go this far.

Now, that's transformation...


Well, when an attack lion is too close for comfort......well, fill in the gaps.
[Column] Jonathan And The London Olympics
Reuben Abati posted on 08-19-2012, 13:56:42 PM
It is no longer enough to participate in the Olympics. Nations go to the Olympics to win medals, because an Olympic victory is an effective vehicle of national rebranding and assertion. The Jamaicans have Usain Bolt. They beat the Americans in the 4x100 men’s relay. They won 4 gold medals, broke two world records, and grabbed a total of 12 medals.

user posted image

All that raised the level of Jamaican patriotism a few more notches. It was a case of a country re-affirming its confidence in its ability to impress the world. The Americans, forever sure of their own supremacy, were again excited by their dominance at the London 2012 Olympics.

They came first with the largest collection of individual heroes: Michael Phelps, Missy Franklin, Gabrielle Douglas, Serena Williams and more. China again wrote its name in gold.

Britain, good old Britain, almost a second or third fiddle or a non-starter in many of the games that it gave to the world, this time around, showed up on the final medals table in the third position, with many of its athletes including Andy Murray, and Jessica Ennis, posting historic feats. Andy Murray who lost to Roger Federer only a few weeks earlier at the Wimbledon Finals, took the shine off the world’s greatest tennis player convincingly.

The London Olympiad brought Britain clear intimations, and affirmations of glory, not just on the field, but also in the overwhelming applause that its organization of the events attracted worldwide. The games are over, now. Jamaicans are walking tall. Grenada, (pop., 105,000) is celebrating its single 400m gold medal. The nations that won nothing are ashamed. In 1996, Nigerians remained awake as the country’s football team won gold, and Chioma Ajunwa took a long jump gold at the Atlanta Olympics. It was an unforgettably fine moment.

In 2008, Nigerians again found cause for cheer with four medals in Beijing. In 2012, we have returned empty-handed, and with jeremiads by the Sports Minister, the National Sports Commission, athletes, and an angry commentariat.

President Jonathan was angry too, I can report. On Wednesday, August 15, council meeting had just ended, and it was time for AOB. Something about setting up a committee to prepare the White Paper ASAP, on the report of the Presidential Committee on Police Reform and the volunteered, additional report on police reform by the Retired Inspectors General of Police Forum. Everyone was in a relaxed mood, until the President said he was surprised that the Minister of Sports had not briefed Council about the outcome of the London Olympics.

“You are taking your time eh”, he said jokingly. “Okay, don’t worry, we understand.”Peals of laughter. Then, the President’s tone changed.

“How can we possibly go to the Olympics and come back with nothing?,” he asked rhetorically. “Four years ago, we did better. It is something that we have to address. Nigeria is a country of talented people. We must identify those talents, all over Nigeria, and begin to train them for the next major sporting tournament. This idea of starting preparations at the last minute and achieving nothing must stop. We must get the private sector to invest in sports and governments at all levels must also do their bit. We are a country of gifted people. We must identify those areas in which this country can excel and work hard at them. We must win medals and bring glory to our nation.

“And I don’t mean going to the bus stop to recruit athletes. I mean serious business. We must get our acts together.

“I remember one man who won an Olympic gold medal in the past. A Nigerian!. When the medal was announced, they said it belonged to Canada, because the fellow was representing Canada. We have to address that too,” he said.

The Minister of Sports raised his hand. The President acknowledged him.

“Minister, I have provoked you to say something at last. Okay, go ahead.”

The Sports Minister thanked Mr. President for his concern, and the interest that Team Nigeria’s performance had provoked with a pledge that his Ministry was prepared to do everything possible to address observed lapses.

The President’s clear message was that winning glory for the nation through sports is not always about finance and money alone. It is also about higher values, commitment, patriotism and the determination to excel by all persons and at all levels.

“I watch these things on television. I listen to the commentaries. We have to take the matter seriously,” said Mr. President.

A keen sportsman, himself, he understands the transformative power of sports: its psychological impact, its physical value, and its economic potential, its political strength and its ultimate relevance as a tool of international relations and diplomacy. At least twice a week, President Jonathan plays squash. I have watched him play at the State House Squash court, and in Government House, Yenagoa. He also plays table tennis. Each time he picks up the racket or the tennis bat, he tells his opponents. “You play your game. Don’t say because I am President I must win. Just play a normal game.” And he goes into the match, a completely different man, sweating for victory. And the aides who take up the challenge, actually play hard and ferociously as if they had been sent by the ACN or CPC. But it never matters. The President is a sportsman. Gracious in victory, magnanimous in defeat.

A compulsive reviewer of situations, after every event, every trip, he wants a post-mortem. He wants serious criticism and honest ideas. And he keeps warning:“don’t tell me what you think I want to hear. That is not the purpose of this meeting. I want us to move this country forward.”

If there is any lesson arising from Nigeria’s performance in the 2012 Olympics, it is that certain issues must be addressed. In Nigeria, excellent performance in sports is perhaps the strongest symbol of unity. Nigerians love sports. They enjoy victory. They crave it. When their country fails, the people mourn. The situation calls for leadership.

Faced with our performance in London, President Jonathan believes that it is time to have a comprehensive rethink of sports administration in Nigeria with a view to working out a clear and implementable strategy for returning Nigerian sportsmen and women to winning ways.

As one who sees him up close and personal each day, I know the President will insist on a thorough review of our entire sports architecture. He will get all critical stakeholders and actors to sit together to identify what went wrong and the best way forward. If it means revisiting the past and reviving the culture of the private sector sponsoring yearly athletic meets like the Mobil Open and such like, then we must revive that. If it takes a reinvigoration of the Inter-House sports tradition in our secondary schools then it will be done. If it means developing sports academies in every state, then that must be undertaken.

But certainly, what Nigeria must do is to properly utilize her sporting assets. Many sportsmen and women of Nigerian origin won medals for various nations including the U.S, U.K and Canada to mention a few. What makes them choose to fly another nation's colours? Is it remuneration? Is it alienation from Nigeria? Whatever it is must be identified and addressed.

These and other steps I see the President taking.

President Jonathan is determined to transform the country’s sports sector. That is one silver lining to the clouds of Nigeria’s Olympic 2012 defeat. What he requires, however, is not the cynicism of the commentariat, not the brittleness of the nay-saying absolutists, not the one track-mindedness of the opposition, not the hypocrisy of sports bureaucrats, rather a national team spirit –that same spirit that propelled Nigeria to its Olympic glory in 1996 and the Flying Eagles to the miracle of Damman in 1989. What this moment requires is not rhetoric, but action.

Fittingly, when the Minister of Information went ahead to brief the press about Council’s deliberations, the Sports Minister was not with him as convention requires. He had gone ahead as directed to begin the process of change in the sports sector.

Dr. Abati is the Special Adviser (Media and Publicity), to President Jonathan

Read full article
Re: Jonathan And The London Olympics
First-lady posted on 08-19-2012, 13:56:42 PM

It is no longer enough to participate in the Olympics. Nations go to the Olympics to win medals, because an Olympic victory is an effective vehicle of national rebranding and assertion. The Jamaicans have Usain Bolt. They beat the Americans in the 4x100 men’s relay. They won 4 gold medals, broke two world records, and grabbed a total of 12 medals.

alt

All that raised the level of Jamaican patriotism a few more notches. It was a case of a country re-affirming its confidence in its ability to impress the world. The Americans, forever sure of their own supremacy, were again excited by their dominance at the London 2012 Olympics.

They came first with the largest collection of individual heroes: Michael Phelps, Missy Franklin, Gabrielle Douglas, Serena Williams and more. China again wrote its name in gold.

Britain, good old Britain, almost a second or third fiddle or a non-starter in many of the games that it gave to the world, this time around, showed up on the final medals table in the third position, with many of its athletes including Andy Murray, and Jessica Ennis, posting historic feats. Andy Murray who lost to Roger Federer only a few weeks earlier at the Wimbledon Finals, took the shine off the world’s greatest tennis player convincingly.

The London Olympiad brought Britain clear intimations, and affirmations of glory, not just on the field, but also in the overwhelming applause that its organization of the events attracted worldwide. The games are over, now. Jamaicans are walking tall. Grenada, (pop., 105,000) is celebrating its single 400m gold medal. The nations that won nothing are ashamed. In 1996, Nigerians remained awake as the country’s football team won gold, and Chioma Ajunwa took a long jump gold at the Atlanta Olympics. It was an unforgettably fine moment.

In 2008, Nigerians again found cause for cheer with four medals in Beijing. In 2012, we have returned empty-handed, and with jeremiads by the Sports Minister, the National Sports Commission, athletes, and an angry commentariat.

President Jonathan was angry too, I can report. On Wednesday, August 15, council meeting had just ended, and it was time for AOB. Something about setting up a committee to prepare the White Paper ASAP, on the report of the Presidential Committee on Police Reform and the volunteered, additional report on police reform by the Retired Inspectors General of Police Forum. Everyone was in a relaxed mood, until the President said he was surprised that the Minister of Sports had not briefed Council about the outcome of the London Olympics.

“You are taking your time eh”, he said jokingly. “Okay, don’t worry, we understand.”Peals of laughter. Then, the President’s tone changed.

“How can we possibly go to the Olympics and come back with nothing?,” he asked rhetorically. “Four years ago, we did better. It is something that we have to address. Nigeria is a country of talented people. We must identify those talents, all over Nigeria, and begin to train them for the next major sporting tournament. This idea of starting preparations at the last minute and achieving nothing must stop. We must get the private sector to invest in sports and governments at all levels must also do their bit. We are a country of gifted people. We must identify those areas in which this country can excel and work hard at them. We must win medals and bring glory to our nation.

“And I don’t mean going to the bus stop to recruit athletes. I mean serious business. We must get our acts together.

“I remember one man who won an Olympic gold medal in the past. A Nigerian!. When the medal was announced, they said it belonged to Canada, because the fellow was representing Canada. We have to address that too,” he said.

The Minister of Sports raised his hand. The President acknowledged him.

“Minister, I have provoked you to say something at last. Okay, go ahead.”

The Sports Minister thanked Mr. President for his concern, and the interest that Team Nigeria’s performance had provoked with a pledge that his Ministry was prepared to do everything possible to address observed lapses.

The President’s clear message was that winning glory for the nation through sports is not always about finance and money alone. It is also about higher values, commitment, patriotism and the determination to excel by all persons and at all levels.

“I watch these things on television. I listen to the commentaries. We have to take the matter seriously,” said Mr. President.

A keen sportsman, himself, he understands the transformative power of sports: its psychological impact, its physical value, and its economic potential, its political strength and its ultimate relevance as a tool of international relations and diplomacy. At least twice a week, President Jonathan plays squash. I have watched him play at the State House Squash court, and in Government House, Yenagoa. He also plays table tennis. Each time he picks up the racket or the tennis bat, he tells his opponents. “You play your game. Don’t say because I am President I must win. Just play a normal game.” And he goes into the match, a completely different man, sweating for victory. And the aides who take up the challenge, actually play hard and ferociously as if they had been sent by the ACN or CPC. But it never matters. The President is a sportsman. Gracious in victory, magnanimous in defeat.

A compulsive reviewer of situations, after every event, every trip, he wants a post-mortem. He wants serious criticism and honest ideas. And he keeps warning:“don’t tell me what you think I want to hear. That is not the purpose of this meeting. I want us to move this country forward.”

If there is any lesson arising from Nigeria’s performance in the 2012 Olympics, it is that certain issues must be addressed. In Nigeria, excellent performance in sports is perhaps the strongest symbol of unity. Nigerians love sports. They enjoy victory. They crave it. When their country fails, the people mourn. The situation calls for leadership.

Faced with our performance in London, President Jonathan believes that it is time to have a comprehensive rethink of sports administration in Nigeria with a view to working out a clear and implementable strategy for returning Nigerian sportsmen and women to winning ways.

As one who sees him up close and personal each day, I know the President will insist on a thorough review of our entire sports architecture. He will get all critical stakeholders and actors to sit together to identify what went wrong and the best way forward. If it means revisiting the past and reviving the culture of the private sector sponsoring yearly athletic meets like the Mobil Open and such like, then we must revive that. If it takes a reinvigoration of the Inter-House sports tradition in our secondary schools then it will be done. If it means developing sports academies in every state, then that must be undertaken.

But certainly, what Nigeria must do is to properly utilize her sporting assets. Many sportsmen and women of Nigerian origin won medals for various nations including the U.S, U.K and Canada to mention a few. What makes them choose to fly another nation's colours? Is it remuneration? Is it alienation from Nigeria? Whatever it is must be identified and addressed.

These and other steps I see the President taking.

President Jonathan is determined to transform the country’s sports sector. That is one silver lining to the clouds of Nigeria’s Olympic 2012 defeat. What he requires, however, is not the cynicism of the commentariat, not the brittleness of the nay-saying absolutists, not the one track-mindedness of the opposition, not the hypocrisy of sports bureaucrats, rather a national team spirit –that same spirit that propelled Nigeria to its Olympic glory in 1996 and the Flying Eagles to the miracle of Damman in 1989. What this moment requires is not rhetoric, but action.

Fittingly, when the Minister of Information went ahead to brief the press about Council’s deliberations, the Sports Minister was not with him as convention requires. He had gone ahead as directed to begin the process of change in the sports sector.

Dr. Abati is the Special Adviser (Media and Publicity), to President Jonathan



..Read the full article
Re: Jonathan And The London Olympics
Olamide posted on 08-19-2012, 15:16:32 PM
Story story???? Stooooryyyyyyyyyyyyy. Once upon a time? time time. Nigeria used to perform at the Olympics andbring home some medals, abi? Now, we cannot even get a grass medal and the President was 'concerned' abi? He has 'promised' (as usual), to look into the issue and address the perennial failure of our sports sector (like other sectors in Nigeria) and the usual humiliation of Nigerians who are not able to identify with their country ans show patriotism when our athletes make us proud. Granada, the size of a small local government area in Nigeria won a gold medal and Dr Abati was wondering why they were celebrating? They were made proud by their boy who won the gold. If Abati had any modicm of decency, he wouldunderstand wht it means to sit in front of the TV, with friends and colleagues from other nations, telling them your country will triumph but deep down in your heart, knowing that this is very unlikely.

that was what happened during the Olympics in London and millions of patriotic (more than the pseudo-patriotic politicians in Abuja) Nigerians suffer the pains and the humiliation of not seeing our flag flown even at half-mast and our national anthem not sung even by mistake while countries like Kenya, Ethiopia, Algeria, South Africa and Morocco had their flags flown and their national anthems sung several times.

Medals are not worn through empty rethorics and promises that never materializes. We are still trying to digest the 'transformation agenda' and the disappointment. The USA performed marvelously because of adequate preparations. For the information of Dr. Abati and the yes-men who surrounds Mr. Jonathan, the US government already informed the whole world that the camp for 2016 Olympics will open in September 2012 (yes, not 2014 and not 2015). By the time the athletes are trained for four years, they are already world beaters.
Do you wonder why no Nigerian flags were seen at the Olympics? It was because Nigerians were ashamed while the Americans were draped in flags of various sizes and proud to be identified as Americans. No citizen want to identify with a failing country. The Nigerians who came around hid their flags in their bags because there was no reason towave the flag for failure.

Some of our best talents are refusing to wear the Nigerian colours for a very simple reason: they don't trust the government enough and are tired of teh corruption in the sports Ministry. 51 athletes represented us at the Olympics but we have never been told how many officials and 'officials' went on Nigerian taxpayer's money including Personal Assistants, Special Assistants, Senior Special Assistants and concubines. Osagie, Ohuruogu, Idowu Phillips and a host of others competed for Britain. Canada had a Nigerian athlete, France had a Nigerian in her 4X100 metres relayt team and a host of other countries too. What does that tell you, Mr. Abati?

Gathering 'prayer warriors' will not help (the usual step taken to convince God to toe our 419 way of thinking) us a bit. Next time you are coming here to tell us tales by moonlight, please just know that we have master 'Story Tellers' on NVS. Squash and Table Tennis my a************************s.

This is the end of my story. The moral of the story is that you cannot plant onion and expect to harvest cassava.
Re: Jonathan And The London Olympics
First-lady posted on 08-19-2012, 15:38:17 PM
I wish I could update this to how many won medals
But this ought to make Abati and his master shed tears
This may not be the full list o
These are just the ones with korokoro Nigerian names


QUOTE:
Margaret Adeoye (born 22 April 1985)[1] is a British athlete who competes in the 200 metres. She will represent Great Britain at that distance in the London Olympics.[2]


Her personal best for the 200m was gained on 24 June 2012 when she ran the distance in 23.09s in a qualifying heat of the Olympic trials, going on to win the final the same day.




QUOTE:

Anyika Onuora (born 28 October 1984) is a British sprint athlete who specialises in the 100 and 200 metres, and also the 4Ã - 100 metres relay.

Her first major junior international competition was the 2003 European Athletics Junior Championships, where she finished fifth in the 100 m event and won a silver medal with the British 4Ã - 100 metres relay team.


A
QUOTE:
nthony Oluwafemi Olaseni Joshua (born 15 October 1989) is an English amateur boxer from Finchley in London, England, competing in the 91kg+ (Super-Heavyweight) division, and representing Finchley ABC & GB Boxing. He is ranked Number 3 in the World at 91kg+ by the AIBA World Rankings.


QUOTE:
Anthony Ogogo, beat Stefan Hartel to reach the middleweight semi-final at the London 2012 Olympic Games


QUOTE:
Marilyn Chinwenwa Okoro (born 23 September 1984 in London) is a British athlete of Igbo Nigerian ancestry.[1] She finished third in the 800 metres at both the 2007 and 2008 IAAF World Athletics Final. She was on the bronze winning 4 Ã - 400 m relay at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics. She represented Great Britain at the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008 and finished sixth (1:59.53 mins) in the semifinals.[2]


QUOTE:
Lawrence Okoye - Team GB men discus throw


QUOTE:
Philips Idowu representing GB - Men triple jump


QUOTE:
Christine Ohuruogu and Lawrence Okoye they are of Nigerian ancestry


QUOTE:
Natalie Achonwa - Canada basketball


QUOTE:
Oluwasegun Makinde- Team Canada 4x100 relay



QUOTE:

Oluseyi Smith -Team Canada 4x100 relay


QUOTE:
Ezinne Okparaebo- Team Norway 100m , 200m women


QUOTE:
Eniola Aluko - Team GB women football


QUOTE:
Peter Bakare- Team GB Men Volleyball


QUOTE:
Abdul Buhari - Team GB Discus throw (born in Kano)


QUOTE:
Ifeoma Dieke- Team GB women football



QUOTE:
Temi Fagbanle - Team GB Women basketball

QUOTE:

Ayodele Ikuesan - Team France Athletics Women's 4 x 100m Relay


QUOTE:
Foluke Akinradewo- Team USA Women volleyball


QUOTE:
Innocent Emeghara Team Switzerland - Men's Football



QUOTE:
Christine Ohuruogu - Team GB Women's 400m , Women's 4 x 400m Relay - A silver medal


QUOTE:
Danielle Alakija - Team Fiji womens 400m





QUOTE:
Anthony Alozie team australia -Born in Aba


QUOTE:
Andre Iguodala representing team USA basketball (benin boy )



I feel like throwing away my Nigerian passport wallahi
Even Fiji sef has Nigerian representing them
We are truly in a sorry state
1 2 3 4
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