Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria

A bill to create grazing reserves and livestock routes across the country is under consideration in the Senate. Proponents of the bill argue that once passed, it will reduce the incessant clashes between nomadic pastoralists and farmers in different parts of the country. The bill provides for a National Grazing Reserves Commission and those promoting it have reminded Nigerians that the idea of grazing reserves and corridors is not new in the country. Up to a point, they are correct.  Following the Othman Danfodio Jihad of 1804, the Fulani who had foisted themselves on parts of Northern Nigeria in the name of Islam, created grazing reserves for their bororo kith and kin across the areas they had influence on. Though the British who privileged the Fulani over and above other ethnic nationalities in Northern Nigeria ‘formalized’ these reserves, it was five years after independence that the Northern Regional Government enacted the Grazing Reserve Law. By 1976, the Federal Government assisted by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) had established hundreds of reserves for use by nomadic pastoral families. Given the skewed nature of this concept, it never succeeded explaining the incessant clashes between the intended beneficiaries of the concept and farmers across the country from Southern Kaduna to Oyo state. The Miyetti Allah Cattle Breeders Association of Nigeria (MACBAN) have however not given up on their dream to have grazing reserves and their continued lobby of government and politicians  is certainly responsible for the current initiative to resuscitate this concept.

Many people argue that creating grazing reserves across the country is a positive development because it will boost livestock development, reduce the pastoral burden, check incessant migration of nomads and improve the strained relationship between famers and nomads. While these reasons maybe laudable, they are entirely besides the issues that are material to the nomadic challenge in Nigeria. Two of these issues stand out. One is the rapid desertification of the Sahara that has continued to encroach virtually unchecked on part of the country while the other is the international character of the Fulani who are at the centre of nomadic pastoralism in Nigeria. Increased desertification is a driving force behind the push of nomads into other parts of Nigeria in search of pasture. This push is exacerbated by nomads from other West African countries that flood the Nigerian area in search of pasture especially in the dry season. The Fulani who are at the centre of the nomadic challenge in Nigeria are incidentally spread throughout West Africa. More than half of them are however in Nigeria where their population has continued to grow due to immigration from neighbouring West African countries suffering from the incessant sahelian drought.

The nomadic challenge cannot be tackled successfully by creating grazing reserves. What the country needs more than anything else is to effectively check desert encroachment and discourage the nomadic push into and across the country especially in areas inhabited by farmers whose attachment to the land is fore grounded by a different set of values from those of nomads. Given the international character of Fulanis, it is quite clear that many of them who have continued to push into different  parts of the country are not even Nigerian citizens. Creating grazing lands in the country for the benefit of non Nigerians at the expense of Nigerian farmers is not only irresponsible, it is unpatriotic. Nomadic pastoralism might have been a good model of keeping livestock in the past but not so today. The conflicts it has continued to generate across the country alone should make us rethink this way of life. Nomadic pastoralism also has implications for national and regional security. The manner in which nomads crisscross national boundaries penetrating deep into countries like Nigeria is capable of undermining national security  at many levels. Arms and ammunitions can be moved in and around countries without detection. The sophisticated weapons deployed by Fulani militias against unsuspecting farmers in places like Plateau, Nasarawa, Taraba and Benue states  should send us thinking about the grave dangers of allowing nomads free movement into and across the country. Nomadic pastoralism also poses a health challenge. Zoonotic diseases from animals to humans are driven by the nomadic lifestyle. This is so because the lifestyle complicates structured livestock health care, making it very difficult to enforce minimum healthcare requirements for livestock and control the incessant outbreak of diseases.

Grazing reserves and dedicated livestock routs are also meaningless unless we are able to ascertain the population of livestock supposed to benefit from the reserves. At the moment, there is no certainty about  the livestock population we are dealing with in the country. Indiscriminate immigration of nomads into the country has made this difficult. It is therefore difficult to establish the carrying capacities of these reserves and routes complicating the extent to which they can be managed sustainably. Increased population build up amongst farming communities is also putting pressure on available farmlands. This will make it very difficult for farmers to accept grazing reserves that will shrink available farmlands.

Nomadic pastoralism is not sustainable- not any more. The future for livestock farming in Nigeria must be on the farm and ranches specially developed to accommodate those with animals. People with animals  must reside, feed and keep their animals on farms. Fortunately for us, institutions like the National Animal Production Institute (NAPRI) in Zaria have developed and tested varieties of pasture that can be produced in commercial quantities to support such farms. Contrary to proponents of the grazing reserves bill, it is ranches and farms that can grow livestock production in the country and not grazing reserves.

States who are at the receiving end of the bill must be in the forefront of rejecting this bill. If passed, it will not only destabilize them, it will also pitch their unsuspecting farmers against better armed nomads who are bent on imposing an archaic way of life on the country at all cost. Nomads in places like Plateau, Nasarawa, Taraba and Benue states are also gradually staking political claims to land leading to frictions and bloodletting. The grazing reserves bill is also against the spirit of true federalism. If Nigerian states like Sokoto, Kebbi, Kano, Bornu and Katsina for whatever reasons, would want to allow nomads from other countries to graze their states, it will be too much for them to expect that such nomads and Nigerian nomads must also have free grazing access in other Nigerian states. Other states in the spirit of true federalism must begin to regulate livestock farming in favour of farms and ranches. If states like Plateau, Benue, Taraba and Nasarawa  had such legislation, the amount of bloodshed and the intensity of conflict between nomads and farmers reported in them would have been significantly reduced. Many of the herds grazing indiscriminately across the country belong to the Fulbe siire (Toronkawa) who are rich patrons in the cities. The Fulbe ladde (Fulanin bororo) who tend these herds are merely hired hands. The Toronkawa can afford ranches and farms upon which to keep their cows. They can also grow the appropriate pasture for these herds and must be compelled by legislation to do this. Even though, the bororo  prefer traditional Fulani education(pulaaku), if they settle on ranches and farms with their herds, it will be easy to integrate their children into the normal school system saving the country tons of money which is literally wasted today in the guise of providing nomadic education. Government at the Federal and State levels must muster sufficient courage to let Nigerians who want to keep livestock know that the way forward in tackling the nomadic challenge is in ranches and farms not grazing rights across the country.

The lobby of the Miyetti Allah Cattle Breeders Association of Nigeria (MACBAN) and other Fulani groups is nothing more than cheap blackmail. The Association is living in the past and must wake up to the realities of our time. It is no longer possible to foist a Fulani interest on other parts of the country and invite Funalis from all over West Africa to benefit from the foisting. The arguments of Fulani apologists to the effect that nature has consigned the Fulani and his cattle to the bush where he has no option than to fight to the ‘last drop of his blood’ to graze uncultivated forests and grass lands on the continent is unacceptable. The Fulani ambition to one day get his herd to drink from the Orange river in Southern Africa is obscene and is repeated only because of arrant arrogance and extreme disregard for people including national and other boundaries. Fulani cattle have no ‘universal rights’ to grazing resources in the country. Staking claims to such imaginary rights is an ambition that courts chaos which we must avoid by all means. 

Dr. Zacharys Anger Gundu writes from Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria



1 2 3 4
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Denker posted on 09-19-2012, 03:59:15 AM
thank you very much Dr. Zacharys Anger Gundu, i totally agree with your well reseached writeup...indeed.

ps: when'll GEJ starts making optimal use of his presidential executive power....the answer, ma friend, is blowing in the wind...anywaz...
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Enyi posted on 09-19-2012, 09:12:22 AM
NASS will be playing with fire if it passes such a law. Many are still struggling with the obnoxious Land Use Act in a country where land is essentially owned by individuals and communities. How many people will fold their arms and watch as their ancestral lands are taken from them and declared reserves for the Fulanis? Let me repeat once more- the Fulanis must find alternative means of raising their cattle. Times have changed and they must change with them.
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Olamide posted on 09-20-2012, 08:42:47 AM
This is a very good piece. Well-researched, articulate and objective. I also object strongly to the idea of creating a reserve of any kind from my ancestral lands for Fulani cattle. The fulani cattle rearers should establish ranches, learn water conservation and pasture methods.
It will be a win-win situation for everyone concerned. The Fulani gets to stop arming themselves with automatic weapons to fight farmers, farmers can concentrate on growing their crops and the cattle can put on some real flesh instead of trekking 2500 kms from Niger to Lagos and developing muscles that will make footballers green with envy along the way. Beef consumers will safe their teeth and stop worrying their dentists while the politicians who are planning to create 'Grazing Reserves' on lands they intend to steal later can find something else to concentrate their energies on.
Our legislators are too idle and too scatterbrained to know why they are in the NASS. Instead of confronting and legislating on issues that will positively impact on Nigerian lives, all they could do is create diversion by debating laws outlawing same sex marriage and gtrazing reserves. Awon were gbogbo.
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Superego posted on 09-20-2012, 09:07:20 AM
I merely skimmed through this and was appalled by the level of ignorance portrayed in every paragraph. Can some1 confirm he is a 'Dr'?

Let's highlight a few from your analysis/suggestions:

1. Ya first point, dessert encroachment- Zacharys or what ur name is, Fulani have been pilgrimaging down to the marsh south ever since before bull dozes came to Nigeria and dessert encroachment or what have u began. The annual pilgrimage to the marsh south is due to the dry season and not due to dessert encroachment. This simply shows your fear is due to misinformation and ignorance and the foundation of ur fear and battle is totally flawed. The Southward annual migration of herds is an annual pilgrimage that has happened by the cows themselves even before fulani tended them since cows evolved in Africa. We come, we go, we pilgrimage down in the dry season, we return, as we have been doing for millenia, we are not taking over.

2. Can u back these two rubbish claims:
QUOTE:
The sophisticated weapons deployed by Fulani militias against unsuspecting farmers in places like Plateau, Nasarawa, Taraba and Benue states should send us thinking about the grave dangers of allowing nomads free movement into and across the country. Nomadic pastoralism also poses a health challenge.

Zoonotic diseases from animals to humans are driven by the nomadic lifestyle. This is so because the lifestyle complicates structured livestock health care, making it very difficult to enforce minimum healthcare requirements for livestock and control the incessant outbreak of diseases.


Dear dogito. The below is a problem of our national security and terrorism and not of cows. Chadian rebels come in as Boko Haram and fight us, we need shore our borders, this is the problem, the problem is not the cows.
QUOTE:
Grazing reserves and dedicated livestock routs are also meaningless unless we are able to ascertain the population of livestock supposed to benefit from the reserves. At the moment, there is no certainty about the livestock population we are dealing with in the country.


The below is true.
QUOTE:
Nomadic pastoralism is not sustainable- not any more. The future for livestock farming in Nigeria must be on the farm and ranches specially developed to accommodate those with animals. People with animals must reside, feed and keep their animals on farms.
But not because nomadism is not good/better. It is true because the south Nigeria have become full of hate and love money more than life. There is too much anger in the heads of these southern biafraists. 'Anger' is their middle name. They wish to farm on every piece of land there is. They are jealous of this simple life and the nomadic business. It is clearly known that pasture grazed cattle are 70% more healthy than farm reared. There is more than enough free public land in the south to create grazing routes for the next 1000 years and not affect farm routes. Paths through less habitted areas. This is a hate war. the south has unfounded hate for fulani, blaming them for their woes, that';s what this is all about. The south steals oil by bunkering and illegal refineries, since Nigeria's inception, half our oil is stolen and is with the south, yet they blame the North as though fulani gain anything from them. the average fulani, Nomad does not even buy oil. he walks, he gains nothing of Nigerias oil on and off shore in the south.

The Berom farmers in Jos who kill and eat Fulani cow and fulani men themselves simply are envious of the Fulani. They live in poverty and envy the fulani with each cows worth as we all know it. And as such they are bitter and they continually ambush and massacre fulani towns, dump us in wells and roast and eat us and rape our women. God will bring justice. We have every right to Nigeria and lands we used and worked and dropped manure on before many of u even ever migrated to these areas!


What is archaic? U illiterate! There is grazing law, rights and pastoral grazing till date in the US!
QUOTE:
States who are at the receiving end of the bill must be in the forefront of rejecting this bill. If passed, it will not only destabilize them, it will also pitch their unsuspecting farmers against better armed nomads who are bent on imposing an archaic way of life on the country at all cost.
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Purple posted on 09-20-2012, 10:54:14 AM
http://www.punchng.com/news/govt-suspends-influx-of-herdsmen-into-ogun/

Govt suspends influx of herdsmen into Ogun

September 20, 2012 by Segun Olatunji, Abeokuta

Ogun State government has ordered Fulani herdsmen to halt their migration to the state as it aims to end clashes between farmers and the cattle-rearers.

Commissioner for Agriculture, Mr. Ayo Olubori, at a meeting of the stakeholders in Abeokuta on Wednesday, said the directive was to enable the state to address the factors responsible for the recurring clashes between farmers and herdsmen and also to set a minimum requirement for the nomads.

Olubori added that issues concerning grazing land, cattle routes, registration and the signing of agreement by the nomads would be resolved at another meeting.

He, however, directed the chairmen of Imeko-Afon, Yewa North and Abeokuta North local governments to convene a meeting of traditional rulers, youths, Fulani herdsmen, farmers and community leaders in their areas to inform them about the government's efforts aimed at forestalling a recurrence of the crises.

The commissioner said, "Fulani herdsmen who are bringing their cattle into the state for grazing should suspend their coming until proper arrangements have been made to ensure that the crises that usually occur between them and farmers do not happen again.

"Government is working to ensure that farmers and herdsmen can cohabit peacefully without a breakdown of law and order and we will not tolerate a recurrence of what was witnessed last year."

Prominent among those who attended the meeting were the representatives of the ministry, security agents, the concerned council bosses, Seriki fulanis of the affected areas and Chairman of the All Farmers Association of Nigeria, Ogun State chapter, Mr. Segun Dasaolu.
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Superego posted on 09-20-2012, 10:59:21 AM
In a free republic, these southerners are calling for war!
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Purple posted on 09-20-2012, 11:13:19 AM
I am not sure how Ogun State intends to enforce its' suggestion, order, advise or whatever it is that the commissioner for agric is trying to say. Does the Ogun State governor have a game plan in place to educate and empower its citizens of their rights against trespassers? Do we need a STAND YOUR GROUND florida type law in Ogun State and other places to protect our farmland, property, women and children from the herdsmena and their rampaging cattle?

From what I have read, these herdsmen are hardened and unreasonable and only speak and understand the language of violence. They are always armed and ready to fight. They have added semi automatic guns to their ever sharpened daggers and their ranks is swelling daily by their brethren from other West African nations.

They ruin farmers crops and trample the locals lands. This is just not acceptable.The Nigerian people really need to resolve the fulani herdsmen problem in order to avoid more Jos like crisis.

The Nigerian government, (state and federal) should do its job and protect citizens. If the NASS lootocrats are increasing their chop monies, the least they can do is show us they are doing some work for us. In the absence of a reasonable solution to the herdsmens problem, abegy allow nigerians to arm them selves and protect their farmlands and property.
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Eace posted on 09-20-2012, 11:27:43 AM
Thank you for a rationale and informed article which clearly understands the needs and interests of people in the 21 century.

You may also wish to consider that it may be desirable for state governments to consider appropriate taxation (and should they wish, subsidisation) of farms or grazing centres in their localities. Those who wish to, can then have an even wider choice on the most suitable state in which to locate their herds. In addition, the Nigerian government will find it a more efficient method for identifying herdsmen and herds - facilitating the efficient recording, study, and management of both human and animal populations in the country.
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Superego posted on 09-20-2012, 11:59:51 AM
This has become a very boooring, southern radical bigot forum.
Re: Tackling The Nomadic Challenge In Nigeria
Emj posted on 09-20-2012, 12:08:18 PM
QUOTE:
The nomadic challenge cannot be tackled successfully by creating grazing reserves. What the country needs more than anything else is to effectively check desert encroachment and discourage the nomadic push into and across the country especially in areas inhabited by farmers whose attachment to the land is fore grounded by a different set of values from those of nomads. Given the international character of Fulanis, it is quite clear that many of them who have continued to push into different parts of the country are not even Nigerian citizens. Creating grazing lands in the country for the benefit of non Nigerians at the expense of Nigerian farmers is not only irresponsible, it is unpatriotic. Nomadic pastoralism might have been a good model of keeping livestock in the past but not so today. The conflicts it has continued to generate across the country alone should make us rethink this way of life. Nomadic pastoralism also has implications for national and regional security. The manner in which nomads crisscross national boundaries penetrating deep into countries like Nigeria is capable of undermining national security at many levels. Arms and ammunitions can be moved in and around countries without detection.


This is a well written piece.
Hmm....we just might be able to finally move from the nomadic age to the modern age as soon as we wake up to smell the coffee and not Mediterranean tea.


Unfortunately the govt of the day is all out to please.....
1 2 3 4
Please register before you can make new comment