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Myne Whitman
May 27, 2007, 05:13 PM
I am doing an MSc and have just started up my dissertation which I titled, 'Global health partnerships and policy reforms in the Nigeria health system'. The research will be more of an analytical review of papers from scientific databases, websites, grey and policy literature as well as contact with some experts.

I hope this is not an imposition but is it possible for interested villagers to give me their opinions on the current situation as regards my topic in terms of Global fund, RBM, MAP, Stop TB, PEPFAR and GAVI? Could you also link me up with anybody who would be willing and in a position to be of help? Any other directions to relevant websites or papers will also be appreciated.

Looking forward to hearing from you. Thank you very much.

Knightofdelta
May 27, 2007, 06:06 PM
I am doing an MSc and have just started up my dissertation which I titled, 'Global health partnerships and policy reforms in the Nigeria health system'. The research will be more of an analytical review of papers from scientific databases, websites, grey and policy literature as well as contact with some experts.

I hope this is not an imposition but is it possible for interested villagers to give me their opinions on the current situation as regards my topic in terms of Global fund, RBM, MAP, Stop TB, PEPFAR and GAVI? Could you also link me up with anybody who would be willing and in a position to be of help? Any other directions to relevant websites or papers will also be appreciated.

Looking forward to hearing from you. Thank you very much.

Hello ma,

I will appreciate it if you could expand the acronyms you used in your post. By RBM, do you mean roll back malaria or reconstructed breast milk? And what are MAP, PEPFAR and GAVI? I have some articles and research work that may be of help to you but you will have to be more specific and precise so that I can understand you.

The Knight of Delta.

Myne Whitman
May 27, 2007, 07:14 PM
Thanks a lot KOD

The partnerships I'm exploring are the following

• The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
• The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI)
• The Stop TB Partnership
• Roll Back Malaria (RBM)
• The World Bank's Multi-Country HIV-AIDS Program (MAP)
• The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)

Cheers.

Anon
May 27, 2007, 07:25 PM
Mulan I thought this might interest you

New Advice on Treating Malaria
Experts' Recommendations Focus on U.S. Travelers Who Contract Malaria Overseas
By Miranda Hitti
WebMD Medical News/ Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD
http://www.webmd. com/news/ 20070522/ new-advice- on-treating- malaria?src= RSS_PUBLIC



May 22, 2007 -- What's the best way to treat malaria when a traveler brings it to the U.S.? It depends, malaria experts report.

Today's edition of The Journal of the American Medical Association includes the latest recommendations on malaria treatment in the U.S.

Malaria is a blood infection that is most commonly spread by mosquitoes. Native cases of malaria have been eliminated from the U.S., but it's still common in other parts of the world. Global travelers may pick up malaria and bring it back to the U.S.

"Every year in the U.S., about 1,200 cases of malaria are reported, resulting in up to 13 deaths per year," write the researchers, who included the CDC's Kevin Griffith, MD, MPH.

Griffith's team reviewed malaria treatment research conducted from 1966 to 2006.

They conclude that diagnosing and treating malaria remains a "challenge" for U.S. doctors as increasing numbers of people in the U.S. journey to countries where malaria is common.

Malaria Treatment Recommendations
Chloroquine remains the treatment of choice for malaria contracted in countries without chloroquine- resistant malaria, according to Griffith and colleagues.

But many parts of the world have malaria that resists chloroquine and other drugs.

For malaria from those areas, Griffith's team recommends Malarone, which combines the drugs atovaquone and proguanil, or taking quinine with one of these three antibiotics: tetracycline, doxycycline, or clindamycin.

Severe malaria cases should be treated with the drug quinidine, since another class of drugs called artemisinins isn't yet available, note Griffith and colleagues.

Malaria should be treated in a hospital, since the disease can be deadly, and U.S. doctors should be aware of its symptoms, which may include fever, chills, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, back pain, weakness, dizziness, confusion, cough, and coma.

Those symptoms don't necessarily indicate malaria. Lab tests are needed to confirm malaria. The recent travel history of patients is also a big clue about their potential malaria exposure.

The journal notes that the researchers' recommendations don't necessarily reflect the CDC's views.

New Treatments Scarce
Every year, more than a million people worldwide die from malaria, according to an editorial published with the study.

"There likely will be a role for vaccine development in disease prevention, but new drugs appear to be few and far between" when it comes to malaria, note the editorialists, who are Gianna Zuccotti, MD, MPH, and Catherine DeAngelis, MD, MPH.

Zuccotti is the journal's contributing editor. DeAngelis is the journal's editor in chief.

Traveling to an area where malaria is common? Before you leave, check with your doctor about malaria prevention.

SOURCES: Griffith, K. The Journal of the American Medical Association, May 23/30, 2007; vol 297: pp 2264-2277. Zuccotti, G. The Journal of the American Medical Association, May 23/30, 2007; vol 297: pp 2285-2286. News release, JAMA/Archives. © 2007 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved.

Anon
May 27, 2007, 07:41 PM
Thanks a lot KOD

The partnerships I'm exploring are the following

• The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
• The Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI)
• The Stop TB Partnership
• Roll Back Malaria (RBM)
• The World Bank's Multi-Country HIV-AIDS Program (MAP)
• The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)

Cheers.

This press release on PEPFAR went out awhile back but you might want to compose and shoot the contact person (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/2004-releases/press02232004.html)mentioned in THE PRESS RELEASE an email

There are folks involved in the Harvard PEPFAR program (the Nigeria program in particular), and you can ask for thier contacts when you email tje above person.

Also look through this website for more information:
http://www.globalhealth.harvard.edu/Files/South%20Africa%20Desciption.pdf

http://aids.med.harvard.edu/oip/education-training/pepfar-broadreach.htm

http://aids.med.harvard.edu/oip/education-training/umndeni.htm

http://www.apin.harvard.edu/documents/Outlook15.pdf

http://www.pepfar.gov/

Also browse through these two websites because they contain a whole lot of information.

http://www.aidsnyc.org/links.html

http://www.aac.org/site/PageServer

http://www.sfaf.org/

http://www.apla.org/


I already posted this 2005 article How to Fight AIDS in Africa (http://www.economicprincipals.com/issues/05.05.01.html)by David Warsh in the lounge section and hopefully you find it useful.

I also found this one quite interesting I bet you would too:

Missed Opportunities :http://hir.harvard.edu/articles/print.php?article=1327
Governance of Global Infectious Diseases
From International Health, Vol. 27 (1) - Spring 2005

hope these have helped some. Now if you keep browsing throughnthis medical section, there are some articles I had posted about some connection between HIV/AIDS and malaria. You might find it somewhere. If I find anything else I'll post it here for you.

Good luck with your work.

Zanderlex
May 28, 2007, 03:05 AM
Google for one Nnewi Man called Mr Moughalu at UN in Geneva and contact him. I think he is in charge of the global fund for TB, Aids and malaria.

Myne Whitman
May 28, 2007, 09:02 AM
@ Zanderlex,

Thanks, I was able to get his contact address from the funds website.