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Ajibs
Oct 28, 2011, 07:38 PM
Nah wah! Dem no dey tire for NFF? Okay what next now? Can't believe this! Somebody will come and write that Amodu should make his third coming...:D :D I don tire sef.. do I have Ghanian roots...? Let me go and find some reasonable team to support... Abi Okocha, you an try??



Samson Siaisa fired as Nigeria coach

Page last updated at 15:33 GMT, Friday, 28 October 2011 16:33 UK


Samson Siasia has been fired as Nigeria coach for failing to take the country to the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations

The executive committee of the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) ratified the decision to sack the coach on Friday.

This comes after the NFF's technical committee recommended the dismissal of the former international.

Siasia came under huge pressure after the Super Eagles failed to qualify for the continent's flagship tournament.

Three weeks ago the Super Eagles had failed to qualify for a Nations Cup finals for the first time since the 1986 edition in Egypt.

The 44-year-old Siasia was a popular choice after he guided Nigeria to the final of the 2005 Fifa Under-20 World Cup in the Netherlands and then the final of the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

However, he fell out of favour after his team could only draw 2-2 with Guinea in Abuja earlier this month in a match Nigeria needed to win to stand a chance of qualifying for the Cup of Nations in Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.

Local media have speculated that former Nigeria skipper Stephen Keshi will take over the team in an interim capacity for six months.

Anyway, he too might become the comeback kid at some point in the future... Anyhow It is not as if we even have good players to coach anyway...:evil::evil:

agensheku
Oct 29, 2011, 02:24 PM
NFF sacks Siasia
By Our Reporter

Super Eagles' coach samson Siasia has been fired as chief coach of the national football teams and the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) has ordered a committee to meet next week to advice on a replacement.:confused1
MTNFootball.com exclusively gathered that the decision by the NFF executive committee headed by president Aminu Maigari was unanimous and they have asked that the technical committee should meet next week to recommend a replacement.

The technical committee earlier this month recommended that Siasia be sacked after he failed to qualify Nigeria for the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations.

"His dismissal has been ratified by the executive committee," a top official informed MTNFootball.com
Siasia was hired in November 2010 with the immediate mandate to qualify Nigeria to at least the semi-final of the Nations Cup to be staged in Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.

He failed to deliver as the Eagles were forced to a 2-2 draw by Guinea in Abuja, when Nigeria needed at least a win.
He was a favourite of the fans to lead the Super Eagles after he guided the country to the final of the 2005 FIFA U20 World Cup as well as the final of the football event of the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

The NFF also confirmed that the country will play host to surprise Nation Cup qualifier Botswana in friendly on November 12 and an unnamed country three days later.

Source:THE NATION

NOTE:I wonder why people apply to be football coaches in Nigeria only to get fired anyhow when you could contest for a political position,win and sit idly by for four years getting fat and stupendously rich!:biggrin:Your constituents would even clap for you and hail:"More blessings!"once you are spreading the loot small,small!
But as a coach,once you lose a match,you are discarded like a burst tokunbo tyre!Agens

Uwaa Sef
Oct 29, 2011, 05:10 PM
Anyhow It is not as if we even have good players to coach anyway...Now, you're talking.

Forget Westerhoff and Bonfrere. These coaches were just lucky to have good players during their tenure. Give these present crop of players to these coaches, and they (coaches) will not be better than Siasia or any other coach for that matter. Playing and doing well in Premier clubs in Europe is not exactly the same as playing well in National teams. Playing against National teams means you're playing against the best from those Premier clubs. It's always a new ball game. If we want to repeat the 1994/1996 feat, let's pray for the likes of Kanu, Okocha, Yekini, Amokachi, etc. Unfortunately, players of their calibre come around once in awhile.

It's not the coach. It's the players.

Later

Enyi
Oct 29, 2011, 05:48 PM
Well, well,well! Siasia should have resigned rather wait for the obvious- a sack. Yes, Nigerians love winners but not cheerful losers

Ph3y
Oct 29, 2011, 09:01 PM
Keshi is back in the country from his US base....He's being touted as a replacement for Siasia.

Those who know him should warn him that NFF [NFA??] is looking for a magician....not a coach.

Cos its only in Nigeria that a coach does not handle a team long enough to impart any tangible tactical knowledge in them.

He only gets to talk to them on phone a few times before he fields them for play and is subsequently booted out

Also remind him that should he be chosen, he would be required to always respect the federal character law while constituting his teams

No Smoking
Oct 29, 2011, 09:33 PM
Nah. It's not the coach. It's not the players. It's the NFF. The NFF that cannot stimulate a vibrant home league.

In the glory years of the Super Eagles, our best players were home-grown and home-based. I recall that only two players, Banjo and one other, used to travel home from England to join the Eagles. Our strong home-based clubs, e.g. Super Stores, Enugu Rangers, IICC, Sharks, Bendel Insurance and Might Jets, produced the bulk of the Eagles.

The current World Champions confirm my point as majority of their players are home-based in Spain. You can't do much with two dozen players arriving Abuja for a few days of camping before Eagles' matches.

NFF, wake up to your responsibilities.

Ajibs
Oct 29, 2011, 11:30 PM
Nah. It's not the coach. It's not the players. It's the NFF. The NFF that cannot stimulate a vibrant home league.

In the glory years of the Super Eagles, our best players were home-grown and home-based. I recall that only two players, Banjo and one other, used to travel home from England to join the Eagles. Our strong home-based clubs, e.g. Super Stores, Enugu Rangers, IICC, Sharks, Bendel Insurance and Might Jets, produced the bulk of the Eagles.

The current World Champions confirm my point as majority of their players are home-based in Spain. You can't do much with two dozen players arriving Abuja for a few days of camping before Eagles' matches.

NFF, wake up to your responsibilities.

Oga sar,
You might want to correct that statement. We did have a sizable chunk of our players playing abroad even in those days. Except you want to get back to the years of Odegbami and Muda Lawal and Chukwu, indeed they all played in local leagues. But don't forget that Okocha, Kanu, Finidi, Amunike, Amokachi et al ALL played abroad and just like today's nonsense players all started at home.

If I am not mistaken, Amokachi played for Ranchers Bees, just like Tijani Banajida and also Celestine Babayaro. Even the Keshi who they say may become coach was playing in Belgium when he was captain of Nigeria. Those guys just had IMHO a bit more patriotism and MOST importantly were not being paid the mega bucks that today's players are paid.

At the time, the likes of Kanu and Amokachi were ALSO breaking stereotypes abroad as well as playing to gain respect from the world. Guys like Keshi, George Weah, Amokachi, Lucas Radebe were the ones that opened the door for the ones that followed to earn the megabucks. Whiles that crop of players have never forgotten their roots, these guys can care less.

Lalakokofefe
Oct 30, 2011, 12:11 AM
Oga sar,
You might want to correct that statement. We did have a sizable chunk of our players playing abroad even in those days. Except you want to get back to the years of Odegbami and Muda Lawal and Chukwu, indeed they all played in local leagues. But don't forget that Okocha, Kanu, Finidi, Amunike, Amokachi et al ALL played abroad and just like today's nonsense players all started at home.

If I am not mistaken, Amokachi played for Ranchers Bees, just like Tijani Banajida and also Celestine Babayaro. Even the Keshi who they say may become coach was playing in Belgium when he was captain of Nigeria. Those guys just had IMHO a bit more patriotism and MOST importantly were not being paid the mega bucks that today's players are paid.

At the time, the likes of Kanu and Amokachi were ALSO breaking stereotypes abroad as well as playing to gain respect from the world. Guys like Keshi, George Weah, Amokachi, Lucas Radebe were the ones that opened the door for the ones that followed to earn the megabucks. Whiles that crop of players have never forgotten their roots, these guys can care less.

So what really is the problem with Nigerian football? Is it the players? Is it the administration/NFA abi na NFF? Because, we have the players, and we have the enthusiasm (everyone in naija loves soccer). By now, we should have gotten at least this part of our existence right.

LKF

No Smoking
Oct 30, 2011, 12:56 AM
So what really is the problem with Nigerian football? Is it the players? Is it the administration/NFA abi na NFF? Because, we have the players, and we have the enthusiasm (everyone in naija loves soccer). By now, we should have gotten at least this part of our existence right.

LKF

No mind N.A.R, bo. 'E dey mention pikins laik Kanu and Okocha when me I dey tok Super Stores, Bendel Insurance, IICC, Sharks, Mighty Jets. I stand by those home-based home-grown lads and the strong Nigerian league of that era. The Kanu genearation that followed gained international profiles from Naija's success in under-age competition, and they were lost to the diaspora. The chance should have been taken to maintain the strong home league, to give everybody a chance to really compete for an Eagle's shirt. Instead, the clueless yawas at NFF just resorted to maintaining the telephone numbers of foreign-based players to show-up for Naija matches.

N.A.R, remember Chairman Chukwu, Emman Okala, Chief Justice Adokie, Muda, Owo Blow, Mathematical Odegbami, Rashidi Yekini, etc. All home-based players in the local Naija league, around whom the Eagles were based.

Ajibs
Oct 30, 2011, 02:05 AM
So what really is the problem with Nigerian football? Is it the players? NAR: YES!!! Is it the administration/NFA abi na NFF? Because, we have the players, NAR: No we don't and we have the enthusiasm (everyone in naija loves soccer). By now, we should have gotten at least this part of our existence right.

LKF

LKF,
Consider that when we DID excel in football, it was under the military regimes and when Nigeria was as upside down if NOT worse that it is today. This is why I don't say its the NFF. I mean have you forgotten when our players usually almost CONSTANTLY went on strike and would refuse to play due to non-payment of allowances? Do you see anyone complaining about that today?

When for example Odegbami and Okala and Rufai won nations cup, if I am not mistaken, they were given houses at Festac Village and one yeye moto, maybe 504 or Volks... :D AND the guys were happy. Today is you give Mikel 504 him no go laff you...? Have you seen Mikel's house in London...?

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/NbLi3h8SEQY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

You think Odegbami and Chairman ever had this kind of house??? Even Yekini???


<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/15944847?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/15944847">Footlocker - Be the Revolution of You - Jon Obi Mikel</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/archersmark">Archer&#039;s Mark</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

Ajibs
Oct 30, 2011, 02:17 AM
No mind N.A.R, bo. 'E dey mention pikins laik Kanu and Okocha when me I dey tok Super Stores, Bendel Insurance, IICC, Sharks, Mighty Jets. I stand by those home-based home-grown lads and the strong Nigerian league of that era. The Kanu genearation that followed gained international profiles from Naija's success in under-age competition, and they were lost to the diaspora. The chance should have been taken to maintain the strong home league, to give everybody a chance to really compete for an Eagle's shirt. Instead, the clueless yawas at NFF just resorted to maintaining the telephone numbers of foreign-based players to show-up for Naija matches.

N.A.R, remember Chairman Chukwu, Emman Okala, Chief Justice Adokie, Muda, Owo Blow, Mathematical Odegbami, Rashidi Yekini, etc. All home-based players in the local Naija league, around whom the Eagles were based.

No Smoking,
First, I have already also mentioned the likes of Odegbami, Rufai and Chairman Chukwu. But if you want to be HONEST. The KANU / YEKINI / OKOCHA teams won better accolades in their teams. Aside from the youth teams, you may forget that it was the Kanu / Yekini / Okocha team that won the nations cup the last time we tasted it in Nigeria. Also that team went to the World Cup three times, 1994, 1998, 2002.

Secondly, you might have missed me calling for Enyimba players to be drafted into the national team and let us forget these foreign based boys.

But you know what that is beside the point. Look at the video clip of Mikel's house above. If a man at such a young age can have such a comfortable and luxurious life, the only thing that will make him play well for his country is love, patriotism and pride. And honestly there is nothing the NFA or NFF can do about that.

No Smoking
Oct 30, 2011, 03:47 PM
....... Look at the video clip of Mikel's house above. If a man at such a young age can have such a comfortable and luxurious life, the only thing that will make him play well for his country is love, patriotism and pride. And honestly there is nothing the NFA or NFF can do about that.

What the NFF should be doing is to create a conducive environment for a vibrant home league. The NFF needs to coordinate development of youth teams, from grass-roots club level, primary schools through to secondary schools. The professional and semi=professional clubs in Nigeria should be assisted to run youth academies to provide a steady stream of talented players. With a reported Naija population of 120 millions and high rate of unemployment, it cannot be difficult to find youths with football brains willing to sign up.

The assumed wealth and luxury of any current Eagle star would not be an issue if hungry, talented new blood is coming through the production line. Oyingbo market no go care for those wey no attend... :D

Lalakokofefe
Oct 30, 2011, 04:23 PM
LKF,
Consider that when we DID excel in football, it was under the military regimes and when Nigeria was as upside down if NOT worse that it is today. This is why I don't say its the NFF. I mean have you forgotten when our players usually almost CONSTANTLY went on strike and would refuse to play due to non-payment of allowances? Do you see anyone complaining about that today?

When for example Odegbami and Okala and Rufai won nations cup, if I am not mistaken, they were given houses at Festac Village and one yeye moto, maybe 504 or Volks... :D AND the guys were happy. Today is you give Mikel 504 him no go laff you...? Have you seen Mikel's house in London...?

The players wealth I will agree is a factor. But no be only Nigerian players get nice houses now, abi? I think No Smoking's theory up there makes sense. The players today do not have to "fight" for a place on the team. Sometimes sef, the coaches are begging them to play for Nigeria. I think their attitudes would change if they realized they didn't have automatic spots on the team. And the only thing that would create that is a vibrant local league. I had an Uncle who was so passionate about the Stationery Stores. Never missed a game. You know, the kind of passion you see these days for Man U and Chelsea, right there in Nigeria. We need to bring that back.

I think it was the Shagari government that doled out the houses and 504s.

LKF

Ajibs
Oct 30, 2011, 06:30 PM
What the NFF should be doing is to create a conducive environment for a vibrant home league. The NFF needs to coordinate development of youth teams, from grass-roots club level, primary schools through to secondary schools. The professional and semi=professional clubs in Nigeria should be assisted to run youth academies to provide a steady stream of talented players. With a reported Naija population of 120 millions and high rate of unemployment, it cannot be difficult to find youths with football brains willing to sign up.

The assumed wealth and luxury of any current Eagle star would not be an issue if hungry, talented new blood is coming through the production line. Oyingbo market no go care for those wey no attend... :D

No Smoking,
But if we consider your argument above then you should CONGRATULATE the NFF! Why? You talk about youth based programs, well as you also noted we have accolades upon accolades when it comes to youth competitions. We have won World U-17, U-19 and also U-23 no be so? We have won African Youth Championships so much that it is almost like if we do not win there was something wrong.

Then you talk about local leagues. In the last couple of years, Nigerian Local teams have made very good showings in the continental competitions. Enyimba got to the semi-finals of this years champions league. AND remember they have won it twice in the past. In 2009 Heartland FC got to the finals of the champions legue and lost. In fact in 2009, TWO Nigerian local teams played each other for the semi finals of the Champions league, Heartland and Kano Pillars. In the Confederations Cup this year, another local team, Sunshine Stars is IN the finals even if not doing so well.

So if you want to be factual about it, it would seem that Nigeria's local league is actually improving greatly. ALSO consider that in many of the other African clubs, they have Nigerians, products of the Nigerian local leagues that play for those clubs, like Esperence Al Hilal, et al.

Now the local leagues needs to continue to improve no doubt, but I think the evidence if there that they are not doing too badly and this is why I think maybe we should forget those foreign based dudes and let hungry and gifted players who still have something to play for be in the national team.

Do you recall that the Egyptian team that won the Nations Cup was almost entirely based of home based players?

Ajibs
Oct 30, 2011, 06:35 PM
The players wealth I will agree is a factor. But no be only Nigerian players get nice houses now, abi? I think No Smoking's theory up there makes sense. The players today do not have to "fight" for a place on the team. Sometimes sef, the coaches are begging them to play for Nigeria. I think their attitudes would change if they realized they didn't have automatic spots on the team. And the only thing that would create that is a vibrant local league. I had an Uncle who was so passionate about the Stationery Stores. Never missed a game. You know, the kind of passion you see these days for Man U and Chelsea, right there in Nigeria. We need to bring that back.

I think it was the Shagari government that doled out the houses and 504s.

LKF

I would agree, but here I will blame globalization. When your Uncle supporter Super Stores, did he have the ability to watch Man U and Chelsea every week on TV? You will notice that each year at the end of the season, those teams go on Worldwide tours for "freindlies" when the reality is its all about business. They have used the information age to reach the ends of the earth and many countries have that problem.

Having said that, I know some Nigerian teams like Enyimba still retain massive support in their home bases. If you follow the news, very few clubs go to Aba and come out unscratched. IF I want to agree, I would say that NFF also needs to get the Nigerian league on TV with GOOD coverage of the matches and keep promoting the sport.

Enyi
Oct 30, 2011, 09:01 PM
NFF, Coaches and Players are all to blame. NFF has no reasonable plan to develop soccer in Nigeria. I suspect many are there to do what we know best- loot, loot, loot. How can anybody take NFF serious? This is an organization that knows 4 years in advance that WC will hold. On many occasions, 6 months to the competition no coach has been appointed. Do they think that countries like Brazil that start at least 4 years before time are foolish? BTW, how long did it take Westerhoef to build the national team? Yet, NFF expects coaches to be magicians.
Our coaches do not have the guts to call the bluff of NFF. I guess that since they have mouths to feed, they are willing to make compromises. Unfortunately, they do not realize that it is their image that is at stake.
Finally, some of our players create the impression that they are doing the nation a favor by playing in the national team. This breeds indiscipline. I am of the opinion that we should rely more on home based players who are hungry to hit big money and fame. BTW, why can't we improve the quality of the national league? Most clubs abroad are private companies. Our money-bags should invest in football rather than in women, real estates abroad and unnecessary chieftancy titles.

No Smoking
Oct 31, 2011, 12:05 AM
BTW, how long did it take Westerhoef to build the national team

Sebi na Paul Hamilton (ex ECN "Shango" striker) been build da team wey Westerhof come inherit. Old NFA did not release funds to run the camp. Paul was using his personal van to convey the players to the training pitch and back.

Lalakoks, KJV Stadium at Onikan was the Mecca of passionate football in those days, hosting the Lagos (LAFA) League, the Prinipals' Cup, Challenge Cup and pre-independence international matches. A few Lagos clubs (Ports Authority, UAC) owned their own stadia. Radio commentators like Ishola Folorunsho, Kevin Ndagoba and Yemi Fadipe, transmitted the passion to all Rediffusion boxes in homes across Nigeria. Abeg, men were men in dem days.... :D

agensheku
Oct 31, 2011, 02:26 PM
No Smoking,
But if we consider your argument above then you should CONGRATULATE the NFF! Why? You talk about youth based programs, well as you also noted we have accolades upon accolades when it comes to youth competitions. We have won World U-17, U-19 and also U-23 no be so? We have won African Youth Championships so much that it is almost like if we do not win there was something wrong.

Then you talk about local leagues. In the last couple of years, Nigerian Local teams have made very good showings in the continental competitions. Enyimba got to the semi-finals of this years champions league. AND remember they have won it twice in the past. In 2009 Heartland FC got to the finals of the champions legue and lost. In fact in 2009, TWO Nigerian local teams played each other for the semi finals of the Champions league, Heartland and Kano Pillars. In the Confederations Cup this year, another local team, Sunshine Stars is IN the finals even if not doing so well.

So if you want to be factual about it, it would seem that Nigeria's local league is actually improving greatly. ALSO consider that in many of the other African clubs, they have Nigerians, products of the Nigerian local leagues that play for those clubs, like Esperence Al Hilal, et al.

Now the local leagues needs to continue to improve no doubt, but I think the evidence if there that they are not doing too badly and this is why I think maybe we should forget those foreign based dudes and let hungry and gifted players who still have something to play for be in the national team.

Do you recall that the Egyptian team that won the Nations Cup was almost entirely based of home based players?

I love your last two paragraphs.But Nija s main problem is laziness.We always love to fall back on ready-made players,hence our falling back on foreign-based players.Any day,any time,Nigeria has a surfeit of good players who are home-based;but because we are big show-offs,we think we can assemble strange bed-fellows from abroad and with a sprinkling of local materials and that they must blend to produce winners with a magical coach.
When last did such experiment work for us?

agensheku
Oct 31, 2011, 02:47 PM
Sebi na Paul Hamilton (ex ECN "Shango" striker) been build da team wey Westerhof come inherit. Old NFA did not release funds to run the camp. Paul was using his personal van to convey the players to the training pitch and back.

Lalakoks, KJV Stadium at Onikan was the Mecca of passionate football in those days, hosting the Lagos (LAFA) League, the Prinipals' Cup, Challenge Cup and pre-independence international matches. A few Lagos clubs (Ports Authority, UAC) owned their own stadia. Radio commentators like Ishola Folorunsho, Kevin Ndagoba and Yemi Fadipe, transmitted the passion to all Rediffusion boxes in homes across Nigeria. Abeg, men were men in dem days.... :DI am sure you meant Kevin Amechi and Ikenna Ndaguba,right?

agensheku
Oct 31, 2011, 03:06 PM
The players wealth I will agree is a factor. But no be only Nigerian players get nice houses now, abi? I think No Smoking's theory up there makes sense. The players today do not have to "fight" for a place on the team. Sometimes sef, the coaches are begging them to play for Nigeria. I think their attitudes would change if they realized they didn't have automatic spots on the team. And the only thing that would create that is a vibrant local league. I had an Uncle who was so passionate about the Stationery Stores. Never missed a game. You know, the kind of passion you see these days for Man U and Chelsea, right there in Nigeria. We need to bring that back.

I think it was the Shagari government that doled out the houses and 504s.

LKF Before the Shagari gesture,the famous IICC Shooting stars first got a gift of brand new Volkswagen beetle car each for doing the Western State proud,they later got 504 saloon cars each.Later,the Federal government doled FESTAC houses to victorious Green Eagles.

In those days,these are prime properties and some of them for reasons best known to them sold their houses and cars and never built any house again or rode in any cars of their own!

Ajibs
Oct 31, 2011, 06:02 PM
Sebi na Paul Hamilton (ex ECN "Shango" striker) been build da team wey Westerhof come inherit. Old NFA did not release funds to run the camp. Paul was using his personal van to convey the players to the training pitch and back.

Lalakoks, KJV Stadium at Onikan was the Mecca of passionate football in those days, hosting the Lagos (LAFA) League, the Prinipals' Cup, Challenge Cup and pre-independence international matches. A few Lagos clubs (Ports Authority, UAC) owned their own stadia. Radio commentators like Ishola Folorunsho, Kevin Ndagoba and Yemi Fadipe, transmitted the passion to all Rediffusion boxes in homes across Nigeria. Abeg, men were men in dem days.... :D

Shebi NTA used to show "Match of the week" in those days. I never saw Abiola babes, Stationary Stores, Shooting or even Leventis Utd. live, but I watched so many of their games on Match of the week. You would expect that a team like the Bridge Boys, with their mega bucks owners should be able to build a first class stadium in Lagos!

Lalakokofefe
Oct 31, 2011, 06:07 PM
I would agree, but here I will blame globalization. When your Uncle supporter Super Stores, did he have the ability to watch Man U and Chelsea every week on TV? You will notice that each year at the end of the season, those teams go on Worldwide tours for "freindlies" when the reality is its all about business. They have used the information age to reach the ends of the earth and many countries have that problem.

Why NFF no move with the times? They can see how leagues are being run in other countries ke... I am not an avid soccer fan like that, you know, fan enough to quote all the stats, but even I know a little about teams and players in other leagues. Because it is being thrown in my face everywhere. Open any naija newspaper, and there more news about the EPL than Globacom League.

The NFF needs to wake up to its responsibility jor!

LKF

atayo
Oct 31, 2011, 09:10 PM
Nah. It's not the coach. It's not the players. It's the NFF. The NFF that cannot stimulate a vibrant home league.

In the glory years of the Super Eagles, our best players were home-grown and home-based. I recall that only two players, Banjo and one other, used to travel home from England to join the Eagles. Our strong home-based clubs, e.g. Super Stores, Enugu Rangers, IICC, Sharks, Bendel Insurance and Might Jets, produced the bulk of the Eagles.

The current World Champions confirm my point as majority of their players are home-based in Spain. You can't do much with two dozen players arriving Abuja for a few days of camping before Eagles' matches.

NFF, wake up to your responsibilities.
I completely agree with your summation and also remember the days when Segun Odegbami, Christian Chukwu, Emannuel Okala and Adokie Amesiemaka were the backbone of the national team.
@bolded, the two foreign based players then were Tunji Banjo and John Chidozie.

Anioma777
Oct 31, 2011, 11:48 PM
OUR CONTINUED HUMILIATION SEEMS TO HAVE NO END IN SIGHT.

I Heard even Jesus Christ pick race when offered the job:D

No Smoking
Nov 1, 2011, 01:00 AM
I am sure you meant Kevin Amechi and Ikenna Ndaguba,right?

Nor be only dat. I also meant KGV, not KJV.. :lol:

I no recall Kevin Amechi O. But Ikenna dey koret. Some of awa NVS threads no dey get eraser for we to koret awa posts. :(

No Smoking
Nov 1, 2011, 01:20 AM
In those days,these are prime properties and some of them for reasons best known to them sold their houses and cars and never built any house again or rode in any cars of their own!

Stars, whether sports or performing artists or TV personalities, were poorly remunerated and under-valued in those days. Players who sold their house or car gifts probably had to do so, to make ends meet. The extended family system is a huge burden on those who have jobs. Of course, personal indiscipline regarding large number of women and children can also weigh one down. Diminishing returns, eh.

agensheku
Nov 1, 2011, 09:14 AM
Stars, whether sports or performing artists or TV personalities, were poorly remunerated and under-valued in those days. Players who sold their house or car gifts probably had to do so, to make ends meet. The extended family system is a huge burden on those who have jobs. Of course, personal indiscipline regarding large number of women and children can also weigh one down. Diminishing returns, eh.I disagree with you!The mistake of our past players was that some of them saw football as the end,whereas people like Segun Odegbami still went for education and are still able to hold their heads high today.
Remember Hakeem Olajuwon,the famous basketballer who hit gold in the US?If he had relied on just that playing skill,he would be pounding American boulevards today,looking for what to eat.But he also went for education and is now a successful businessman.

One should never underrate the role of good education in one s future,no matter how successful today seems.Some of the Nija rave-reviewed soccer star internationals of ten years ago are living in penury in Lagos and other parts of Nija today.The other day when J.J.Okocha aspired to join the NFA Board,some people attacked him that he does not have enough education to serve on that body.
At times,the certificate thing is over-done and good materials are sidelined.Does JJ now need a degree to lend his expertise to the NFF?

No Smoking
Nov 1, 2011, 07:48 PM
Agens wrote:I disagree with you!The mistake of our past players was that some of them saw football as the end,whereas people like Segun Odegbami still went for education and are still able to hold their heads high today.
Remember Hakeem Olajuwon,the famous basketballer .... also went for education and is now a successful businessman.


Which wan be went for education? Adokie (Law), Odegbami (Engineering) and some others continued with their studies through their playing days. On the other hand, there possibly were skilled players who were school drop-outs, for whom having a football brain meant gainful employment.

No matter the route by which legit money is earned, following a sound advice on investment planning is about as much as any of us can do to save something for the latter years. One does not need a degree before coming by that information.

I don't think you can count many graduates in the EPL. Not Wayne Rooney, not Michael Owen, not aaron Ramsey, etc, etc. But the services of financial advisers and personal managers ensure that they do not fritter away all the dosh made in their hey-days.

Uwaa Sef
Nov 2, 2011, 05:10 PM
So what really is the problem with Nigerian football?Other countries are not exactly spectators anymore.

Later

Mikky jaga
Nov 7, 2011, 11:02 AM
The problem with Nigerian football is out inability to keep our good players at home. Once a new star is born this season, he is jetting out the next season to Europe to earn good money or get lost in the transfer market. As the stars are in Europe so tyhe attention of fans got diverted to where the fans are. Ahmed Musa was the highest scorer in the domestic league the previous season, he is now with VV Venlo. The highest goal scorer this year that beat the record of Musa is already on his way out of Nigeria. Our local league is vibrant enough, but how to retain our budding stars is the problem. Even retired stars find it easier to play in some obscure Arab countries than ply their trade in Nigeria.

There is nothing NFF can do about that. Nigerian football needs sponsors that will put money in the game and keep our stars at home. Most of the teams in the Nigerian league are owned by governments that treat them as parastatals. But if we expect a coach to bring players from all over Europe and in 3 days forge them into a winning team, we are only expecting magic or miracle.

No Smoking
Nov 7, 2011, 12:58 PM
If the local league were vibrant, more stars would be produced per year. Nigeria could then be a breeding ground for stars, as is the case with Spain, Portugal, Argentina and Brazil.

Even in the EPL, lower ranked clubs with Youth Academies find themselves as generators of budding stars. They don't sit back and moan. They just keep producing them and selling on, increasing their annual revenue thereby... :D

Mikky jaga
Nov 7, 2011, 03:18 PM
Unfortunately, unlike the lower ranked clubs in EPL, Nigerian stars produced from the local league get lured into slave contract abroad and before any serious club would notice them, they are either injured or long period of warming the bench would have made them lose their sharpness. Their next option is to divert to importing and exporting if they are not caught in the drug ring. Many of our u17 and u20 boys are in many countries abroad plying their trade, but how many of them see regular first team opportunities?

If Vincent Enyeama could be lured from Israel where he commanded the No 1 shirt only to be warming the bench in Lille, you will understand what the young inexperienced Nigerians go through.

No Smoking
Nov 7, 2011, 07:50 PM
If Vincent Enyeama could be lured from Israel where he commanded the No 1 shirt only to be warming the bench in Lille, you will understand what the young inexperienced Nigerians go through.

Wetin man go say? I t'ink awa pipul say dog wey wan loss no dey hia w'istle. Wai 'e be seh awa youngsters no dey sabi seek serious advice on career moves????

Ajibs
Nov 10, 2011, 03:08 PM
The problem with Nigerian football is out inability to keep our good players at home. Once a new star is born this season, he is jetting out the next season to Europe to earn good money or get lost in the transfer market. As the stars are in Europe so tyhe attention of fans got diverted to where the fans are. Ahmed Musa was the highest scorer in the domestic league the previous season, he is now with VV Venlo. The highest goal scorer this year that beat the record of Musa is already on his way out of Nigeria. Our local league is vibrant enough, but how to retain our budding stars is the problem. Even retired stars find it easier to play in some obscure Arab countries than ply their trade in Nigeria.

There is nothing NFF can do about that. Nigerian football needs sponsors that will put money in the game and keep our stars at home. Most of the teams in the Nigerian league are owned by governments that treat them as parastatals. But if we expect a coach to bring players from all over Europe and in 3 days forge them into a winning team, we are only expecting magic or miracle.

This is why I wonder how come a team like the Bridge Boys, JB are not at the top of the league. and as I noted earlier not having atop class stadium when construction is the main business of the team owners. But remember that it was privately owed clubs that produced our star players in the past! Abiola babes, Leventis United, Stationary Stores, IICC Shooting Stars, and of course Inwayanwu Nationale were all privately owed and funded teams...

Now look at what i am talking about players have just been released for CAF African player of the years, only one ONLY Nigerian player from of course Enyimba on the list...


2011 Caf Awards shortlist:

Caf Player of the Year (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/15656229.stm)

Adel Taarabt (Morocco and Queens Park Rangers), Andre Ayew (Ghana and Marseille), Asamoah Gyan (Ghana and Al-Ain), Didier Drogba (Ivory Coast and Chelsea), Kevin-Prince Boateng (Ghana and AC Milan), Moussa Sow (Senegal and Lille), Samuel Eto'o (Cameroon and Anzhi), Seydou Keita (Mali and Barcelona), Yao Kouassi Gervais "Gervinho" (Ivory Coast and Manchester City), Yaya Toure (Cote d'Ivoire and Manchester City).

Caf African Player of the Year

Ayoub Elkhiqi (Morocco and Wydad), Yaya Banana (Cameroon and Esperance), Edward Sadomba (Zimbabwe and Al Hilal), Idrissa Laouali (Niger and ASFA), Jerome Ramatlhakwane (Botswana and Vasco da Gama), Kalu Uche (Nigeria and Enyimba), Oussama Darragi (Tunisia and Esperance), Samir Aboud (Libya and Al-Ittihad), Youssef Msakni (Tunisia and Esperance), Zouhir Dhaouadi (Tunisia and Club Africain)

Nigeria is not even interested in hosting the event now that we have been kicked to the curb in African soccer!!! Ah! nah Wah!

Ajibs
Nov 10, 2011, 03:15 PM
Unfortunately, unlike the lower ranked clubs in EPL, Nigerian stars produced from the local league get lured into slave contract abroad and before any serious club would notice them, they are either injured or long period of warming the bench would have made them lose their sharpness. Their next option is to divert to importing and exporting if they are not caught in the drug ring. Many of our u17 and u20 boys are in many countries abroad plying their trade, but how many of them see regular first team opportunities?

If Vincent Enyeama could be lured from Israel where he commanded the No 1 shirt only to be warming the bench in Lille, you will understand what the young inexperienced Nigerians go through.

But nah moni now... Nah de fault of moni. In Israel, he was even assured of playing in the Champions league almost every year, now great talent like that a bench warmer. When he could maybe have moved to a mid level team like Stoke, or Everton or Fulham and retain his number shirt, get regular playing time and increase his profile at the same time. Van de Sar that just retired from Man U, was once at Fulham for many years... anyways...

Ajibs
Nov 10, 2011, 03:18 PM
be laik say Siasia no vex again...


Ex-Nigeria coach Samson Siasia has withdrawn his legal action against the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF), following his sacking last month. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/15676208.stm)

The former international has backed his successor Stephen Keshi to succeed in the Super Eagles post.

Siasia sued the NFF for breach of contract after he was fired for failing to qualify for the 2012 Cup of Nations.

With some few days before the hearing, Siasia has had a change of heart, insisiting he wants to look ahead.

"I have decided to withdraw my court action against the NFF and that is the end of it," Siasia told BBC Sport on Thursday.

The 44-year-old's lawyers served his former employer with an 'originating summons' following his dismissal from the post.

AN ORIGINATING SUMMONS
Continue reading the main story
An originating summons is a document which formally begins a legal case where people agree on the facts, but need a judge to decide on the meaning of a law, contract, or other document.
"Ultimately, I want to move on in life. We we all learn and grow up everyday," he said.

Siasia swiftly backed his successor and believes his former team-mate Keshi will prosper as the new coach of Nigeria.

He believes the rebuilding work he started but could not finish can help propel the team under Keshi's guidance.

"I can only wish him [Keshi] all the best in the job," Siasia continued.

"There's no doubt it's a great challenge but he's experienced enough to succeed and hopefully take the team to where the fans want them to be.

"He's certainly a big name and come this time next year he'll be a successful manager and make Nigeria fly again."

Last month, the NFF sacked Siasia after the Super Eagles failed to qualify for the continent's flagship tournament for the first time since the 1986 edition in Egypt.

Siasia was a popular choice after he guided Nigeria to the final of the 2005 Fifa Under-20 World Cup in the Netherlands and then the final of the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

However, he fell out of favour after his team could only draw 2-2 with Guinea in Abuja earlier this month in a match Nigeria needed to win to stand a chance of qualifying for the Nations Cup in Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.

Former Nigeria skipper Stephen Keshi has since been named as his replacement.

I expect he will find a new job quickly and it might very well be with a country going to the Nations Cup...:D

Besides what is Shaibu Amodu up to these days..?

Mikky jaga
Nov 10, 2011, 05:18 PM
This is why I wonder how come a team like the Bridge Boys, JB are not at the top of the league. and as I noted earlier not having atop class stadium when construction is the main business of the team owners. But remember that it was privately owed clubs that produced our star players in the past! Abiola babes, Leventis United, Stationary Stores, IICC Shooting Stars, and of course Inwayanwu Nationale were all privately owed and funded teams...


Julius Berger is no longer in the premier league. All those private clubs you mentioned are now defunct. IICC has always been owned by State Government. That JB could not construct its own Stadium shows the type of lip service private clubs pay to soccer development in Nigeria.

All the 20 Premier league clubs today are owned by different State Governments with some having two clubs in the league.

If government withdraws from football today as advocated by FIFA, football in Nigeria is dead.


Now look at what i am talking about players have just been released for CAF African player of the years, only one ONLY Nigerian player from of course Enyimba on the list...

That is the problem. Nigerian players are overfed and overrated, pampered boys that do not know they are nothing to reckon with even in Africa. Messi that narrowly beat Mikel to the MVP in U20 has won the best footballer in the world many times, Mikel has not even been named once in Africa and the boy feels he is some superstar whenever called upon to play for Nigeria. Nonsense and ingredients.

Ajibs
Dec 1, 2011, 12:28 AM
See why Naija players are not playing for big clubs anymore? The small kuza this one is making and his is arriving late for training and is now benched...



Chinedu Obasi dropped from Hoffenheim squad

Page last updated at 12:02 GMT, Wednesday, 30 November 2011


Hoffenheim's striker Chinedu Obasi has been dropped from the squad for lateness
Chinedu Obasi has been dropped from the squad of German side Hoffenheim for showing up late for training.

The Nigeria striker was axed along with his Brazilian team-mate Firmino for the same offence.

The Bundesliga club's general manager Ernst Tanner said the two are "employees who are not badly paid but come late to work."

Firmino scored in the 1-1 home draw against Freiburg on Saturday.

Neither is expected to play in Friday's game against Bayer Leverkusen.

Tanner says he and coach Holger Stanislawski agreed on suspending the two because they are repeat offenders.

No Smoking
Dec 1, 2011, 12:18 PM
Oh dear. Dis Germans neva hia about Jammo / African time ni.... :rolleyes:

Bunch17
Dec 6, 2011, 08:34 AM
This is how it is done and not Siasia's pathetic attempt at begging to stay in the job he was not suited to.


Austin Eguavoen quits after qualifying failure

By Oluwashina Okeleji
BBC Sport, Lagos Nigeria's Olympic qualifying campaign ended in failure as the 2008 silver medallists won just one of their Group A gamesNigeria's Under-23 coach Austin Eguavoen has quit after failing to qualify for the 2012 Olympic Games. The so-called 'Dream Team V' crashed out in the group stages of the qualifying tournament in Morocco after losing twice and winning just once.


The 46-year-old leaves after Nigeria, runners-up at the Beijing Olympics in 2008, finished third.

In a resignation letter, Eguavoen cited the qualifying failure for the London Games as his reason to quit.
"I hereby resign my post as coach of the national U23 team despite all the support I received from the NFF," Eguavoen told the NFF.

"I'm so sorry I couldn't make it. I think it's just honourable for me to resign after failing to meet the set targets."

In a press statement, the former Nigeria international thanked the NFF and fellow Nigerians for their support and the opportunity to serve.I thank every Nigerian for being there for me and giving me all the support needed

Austin Eguavoen


"I apologise to Nigerians for our disappointing outing. I had confidence in this team, unfortunately it didn't turn out the way we wanted. I am deeply sorry," Eguavoen was quoted as saying.

"My contract is tied to this tournament with a target of reaching at least the semi-finals of the Olympics in London, but I have failed in that target.


"I thank every Nigerian for being there for me and giving me all the support needed for this tournament."
Chris Green, the chairman of the NFF's technical committee, confirmed the receipt of Eguavoen's letter to BBC Sport.
The Olympic disappointment completed a dark year for football followers in Africa's most populous country after country and club failures.


In October, Nigeria failed to qualify for the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations in Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.

It marked the first time the Super Eagles had failed to qualify for a Nations Cup finals since the 1986 edition in Egypt.
Meanwhile, the Super Falcons, the most successful womens side in Africa, failed to qualify for the 2011 All Africa Games as well as the London Olympics.


And they may have won the world cup trophy thrice but Nigeria's under-17 side could not even qualify for the African championship.
(http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/16025108.stm)
(http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/16025108.stm)In August, the Flying Eagles then lost in the quarter-final of the Under-20 World Cup in Colombia - while at club level, both Enyimba and Sunshine Stars made semi-final exits in the Caf Champions League and Confederation Cup respectively. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/16025108.stm)

Mikky jaga
Dec 6, 2011, 09:51 AM
There was nothing novel or credit worthy in what Eguavoen dir. He just learned a lesson or two from Sia Sia's debacle, that is all.

This was the first time Nigerian coaches were given valid contract and, naturally, they felt that protected them from arbitrary sack. But Sia's case has shown them it was not so, that performance was also built into the contract.

I believe Eguavoen also caused Sia his job by losing the opening match to Guinea before Sia took over and that, unfortunately, was the only loss of the team in the qualifier that marked the end of Nigeria's qualification.

The loss of the Dream team too was because of the naivety of the same Eguavoen. He knew the competition would not be on a FIFA free day when clubs were obliged to release their players. Rather than concentrate on grooming the players that were available into a winning team, he was all over Europe begging clubs to release their wards.

The boys he eventually used knew he was using them because he had no choice and that if they qualify, they would be qualifying for the Europe based boys to take over. So they did not play for qualification, but showed their stuff in the last game by pumping 4 goals past the hapless Algerians.

The fay Nigerians are cured of their colonial mentality is the fay our football begins to grow. If it is not Oyibo coach, it must be Oyibo trained boys as if these boys were not discovered from the local league.

Bunch17
Dec 6, 2011, 04:14 PM
The fay Nigerians are cured of their colonial mentality is the fay our football begins to grow. If it is not Oyibo coach, it must be Oyibo trained boys as if these boys were not discovered from the local league.

Gbam!
Please remind me again, how many locally based players did Sia Sia use during his entire tenure?

BTW: Mikky J, you dey Naija right?
Of all the the threads you have contributed to in this section, I cannot remember you ever giving us a heads up on Nigerian based players and teams , Arsenal you dey there, Chelsea you too dey there, Manu ......

Abeg Mikky, no be yab I yab you soo, but e go good, make once in a while, you go bring for here the name of a home based player make we discuss. Only then can those of us who don't have the luxury of watching Naija league truely assess how much progress we are making or how far into the wilderness we have sunk.

This a true story that happened to me in Enugu in around 2003. We were driving past the Nnamdi Azikiwe stadium when I saw a sign that said Rangers vs ........, not having seen the name of the away team, I asked my Enugu based driver
"Who is playing today?"

"Arsenal and Chelsea" he replied!

Mikky jaga
Dec 6, 2011, 04:58 PM
Gbam!
Please remind me again, how many locally based players did Sia Sia use during his entire tenure?

BTW: Mikky J, you dey Naija right?
Of all the the threads you have contributed to in this section, I cannot remember you ever giving us a heads up on Nigerian based players and teams , Arsenal you dey there, Chelsea you too dey there, Manu ......

Abeg Mikky, no be yab I yab you soo, but e go good, make once in a while, you go bring for here the name of a home based player make we discuss. Only then can those of us who don't have the luxury of watching Naija league truely assess how much progress we are making or how far into the wilderness we have sunk.

This a true story that happened to me in Enugu in around 2003. We were driving past the Nnamdi Azikiwe stadium when I saw a sign that said Rangers vs ........, not having seen the name of the away team, I asked my Enugu based driver
"Who is playing today?"

"Arsenal and Chelsea" he replied!

You will not see any Nigerian player of note to discuss. The reason is simple all those coaches, whether Oyibo or Naija will never give you a call up into the National team if you ply your trade locally. So, to be relevant, these players sign rifdiculous contracts just to be seen as playing outside Nigeria. That is apart from financial inducement.

There is this most decorated player in the local league - Victor Ezeji. He had won continental championships with Eyimba, Sharks , Dolphins etc, apart from many league titles and Challenge Cup victories. He always managed to be the highest goal scorer wherever he plays, but he has never been called to the SE just because he remained at home.

How on earth do you bring players that play in different leagues in Europe and under different coaches, camp them for 3 days and expect them to be a winning team? Majority of Spain's World Cup winning team players play in the Spanish League. Egypt that won the AFCON 3 times back to back sourced her players from their local league.

Why can't we have a standing team of Super Eagles players that MUST remain at home. Once he goes out, another person takes his place. These people should be paid attractive allowance that will make them want to stay in Nigeria and play their game here. After they must have played together for some years they become a winning team and only two or three players outside, with exceptional skills will be invited to join them during competitions.

Bunch17
Dec 6, 2011, 05:20 PM
You will not see any Nigerian player of note to discuss. The reason is simple all those coaches, whether Oyibo or Naija will never give you a call up into the National team if you ply your trade locally. So, to be relevant, these players sign rifdiculous contracts just to be seen as playing outside Nigeria. That is apart from financial inducement.

There is this most decorated player in the local league - Victor Ezeji. He had won continental championships with Eyimba, Sharks , Dolphins etc, apart from many league titles and Challenge Cup victories. He always managed to be the highest goal scorer wherever he plays, but he has never been called to the SE just because he remained at home.

How on earth do you bring players that play in different leagues in Europe and under different coaches, camp them for 3 days and expect them to be a winning team? Majority of Spain's World Cup winning team players play in the Spanish League. Egypt that won the AFCON 3 times back to back sourced her players from their local league.

Why can't we have a standing team of Super Eagles players that MUST remain at home. Once he goes out, another person takes his place. These people should be paid attractive allowance that will make them want to stay in Nigeria and play their game here. After they must have played together for some years they become a winning team and only two or three players outside, with exceptional skills will be invited to join them during competitions.

Admin where is the thank you button?
MJ, you have hit the nail on its head.
Thank you.

I have always been bothered by the fact that some of our National Team members play for obscure teams in obscure leagues.
How did the manager know he is a good player? Was he watching the Uzbek league? Why no home based players? Could
it be that the manager does not watch the local league? Could it be that the practice of playing bribes to be invited to the National team has continued?

We have reached a point that the backbone of our National team should be home based footballers. If this happens, it would serve as an incentive to younger players to get better and get into the SE. Nowadays the route seems to be play in the under something competition, get signed by a Norwagian, Uzbek, or Cypriot team, languish in their reserve team for years and hey presto you are a Super Eagle.

Anioma777
Dec 6, 2011, 07:31 PM
@MJ and Bunch17

Thanks for your insight. What sad state of affairs for Nigerian. When was the last time most of teams national and local failed so miserably.

I plan to go and watch and familiarize myself with local teams when I go to Naija next year. One of my cousins gave me a rather perplexed look when I asked about local matches. He just could not understand why having lived abroad and used to European leagues and fortunate to have seem a dozen games or so at the Nou Camp and Malaga I will be interested in local football.
Grim times!!!

No Smoking
Dec 6, 2011, 11:20 PM
Eguavon's resignation letter is rather over-done. Like he was forced to write it.

Why should the NFF set a target to win a competition? It's not gladiators fighting for their lives. Teams are trained end equipped with tactics and strategies to out-play their opponents. Add a dash of good fortune, you carry the day. If not, reorganise and try again. Shikena.

Mikky jaga
Dec 7, 2011, 08:03 AM
@MJ and Bunch17

Thanks for your insight. What sad state of affairs for Nigerian. When was the last time most of teams national and local failed so miserably.

I plan to go and watch and familiarize myself with local teams when I go to Naija next year. One of my cousins gave me a rather perplexed look when I asked about local matches. He just could not understand why having lived abroad and used to European leagues and fortunate to have seem a dozen games or so at the Nou Camp and Malaga I will be interested in local football.
Grim times!!!

There is nothing interesting in the local league. It is players that draw crowds to the Stadiums. But before you get used to any good player, he is already on trials in Sudan, of all places. Gone were the days when you can be sure the Stadiums will be jam packed just because Chukwu, Okala Adokiye, Odegbami etc will be playing.

Until we find a way of retaining most of our best legs in the local league, people will continue to wonder what your business in the Stadium is. To watch some unknown quantities kicking ball around?

No Smoking
Dec 7, 2011, 12:39 PM
.....and the state of the Naija local (not National) stadia can be shocking. I remember a few years back when a UK TV crew was compiling a documentary about Lagos Airport. They heard about the Lagos State Challenge Cup Final for that year coming up at the Agege Stadium. Expecting an atmosphere as could be expected in the UK, the crew members excitedly made arrangements to see the game.

Alas, come match day, playing pitch was overgrown with grass, players appeared in disgusting kits and there was nothing to cheer about... :(

Bunch17
Dec 7, 2011, 03:54 PM
Why should the NFF set a target to win a competition?

There is absolutely nothing wrong with setting a target provided the contractor accepts it. You may argue that it is unfair to set unrealistic targets but then again, the contractor accepted the target.

Have you taken a look at Keshi's targets? I guess he must be desperate to coach Nigeria hence he accepted the contract with these targets. With the players we have, for Nigeria to reach the semi finals of the world cup, we will have to play 30 v 11.



There is nothing interesting in the local league. It is players that draw crowds to the Stadiums. But before you get used to any good player, he is already on trials in Sudan, of all places. Gone were the days when you can be sure the Stadiums will be jam packed just because Chukwu, Okala Adokiye, Odegbami etc will be playing.

Until we find a way of retaining most of our best legs in the local league, people will continue to wonder what your business in the Stadium is. To watch some unknown quantities kicking ball around?

There are lots wrong with Nigerian football and unfortunately we like to make NFF the scapegoats. Don't get me wrong, they are not performing well but they are not our only problem. Club owners, the fans, the press are all part of our problems. Go to the sports page of any Nigerian daily today , they have nothing on home based players but they will have a full page on Rooney (copied from a British Tabloid).

Club owners: i remember the time the entry of Abiola, Leventis, NNB, Iwuanyanwu into club ownership raised the profile and living standard of the Nigerian football players, but the fact that our guys are playing in countries like Sudan makes me suspect that they are paid pittance now. What happened to the sponsorship money?

Mikky jaga
Dec 7, 2011, 05:30 PM
There are lots wrong with Nigerian football and unfortunately we like to make NFF the scapegoats. Don't get me wrong, they are not performing well but they are not our only problem. Club owners, the fans, the press are all part of our problems. Go to the sports page of any Nigerian daily today , they have nothing on home based players but they will have a full page on Rooney (copied from a British Tabloid).
Club owners: i remember the time the entry of Abiola, Leventis, NNB, Iwuanyanwu into club ownership raised the profile and living standard of the Nigerian football players, but the fact that our guys are playing in countries like Sudan makes me suspect that they are paid pittance now. What happened to the sponsorship money?

All the clubs in the Nigerian Premier league today are owned by the various State governments. Some, like Rivers State have two clubs in the Premier league. So players and coaches are treated like civil servants. Yet FIFA asks government to hands off soccer administration! I laugh Oyibo laugh.

As for the press, they publish what their readers want to read.

Bunch17
Dec 7, 2011, 06:58 PM
All the clubs in the Nigerian Premier league today are owned by the various State governments. Some, like Rivers State have two clubs in the Premier league. So players and coaches are treated like civil servants.
.

So we have gone back to the days when society regarded football players as college drop outs? Sad!
This is one of the reasons why our football is rapidly going down. No wonder we have people plying their trade in Sudan of all places.

cuteajax
Dec 16, 2011, 02:23 PM
@ Buchi 17

This is how it is done and not Siasia's pathetic attempt at begging to stay in the job he was not suited to.

Abeeegi. What else do you expect from an inept, excuse-making born-failure? U-23 is never a stable age grade team in any national team. apart from Olympics and All Africa games, which other tournaments do they play? those games only come every four years. so having crashed out of both, Eguavoen knew quite well that NFF would not keep him on the payrole for the next four years while sitting idle and waiting for the next Olympics. hence effectively, he knew he was out of job immediately Nigeria crashed out. All his "resignation" palaver is just campaign after election. He wants to eke out some good will for himself by portraying that he did the "honourable" thing but we are not deceived. We would have felt better if he hadn't failed us.

cuteajax
Dec 16, 2011, 02:37 PM
@Mikky Jaga


Why can't we have a standing team of Super Eagles players that MUST remain at home. Once he goes out, another person takes his place.

This won't work. Players will continue to go to Europe after a little exposure at Super Eagles. There will be too much turnover of players for there to be consistency. Only consistency in selection can engender sound teamwork necessary to form a formidable team. It will be counterproductive. You can't build a solid team when key players have to be replaced every few months.

Enyi
Dec 17, 2011, 03:36 PM
Julius Berger is no longer in the premier league. All those private clubs you mentioned are now defunct. IICC has always been owned by State Government. That JB could not construct its own Stadium shows the type of lip service private clubs pay to soccer development in Nigeria.

All the 20 Premier league clubs today are owned by different State Governments with some having two clubs in the league.

If government withdraws from football today as advocated by FIFA, football in Nigeria is dead.



That is the problem. Nigerian players are overfed and overrated, pampered boys that do not know they are nothing to reckon with even in Africa. Messi that narrowly beat Mikel to the MVP in U20 has won the best footballer in the world many times, Mikel has not even been named once in Africa and the boy feels he is some superstar whenever called upon to play for Nigeria. Nonsense and ingredients.

Yes, our international players have over-bloated ego. Many believe that they are doing the country a favor by playing for the nation. Most do not realize that getting recognition is easier than maintaining that recognition. I do not believe that government should own teams. Instead, government should create an enabling environment for private football clubs to thrive. Why are our money-bags afraid to invest in football?

Mikky jaga
Dec 17, 2011, 05:44 PM
Yes, our international players have over-bloated ego. Many believe that they are doing the country a favor by playing for the nation. Most do not realize that getting recognition is easier than maintaining that recognition. I do not believe that government should own teams. Instead, government should create an enabling environment for private football clubs to thrive. Why are our money-bags afraid to invest in football?

The government has refused to repeal the decree that denied NFF autonomy. Nobody puts his money at the whim and caprices of unstable government policies.

Enyi
Dec 17, 2011, 09:35 PM
The government has refused to repeal the decree that denied NFF autonomy. Nobody puts his money at the whim and caprices of unstable government policies.

In that case, we should forget real positive development in soccer.

No Smoking
Dec 20, 2011, 12:38 PM
The government has refused to repeal the decree that denied NFF autonomy. Nobody puts his money at the whim and caprices of unstable government policies.

Why did FIFA lift the most recent ban on the NFF over the flawed elections???

Govt departments / parastatals owning FCs may be acceptable in our current state of (under)-development. However, the actual control of the NFF need not be under the govt, if we want to fall in line with FIFA rules.

Mikky jaga
Dec 20, 2011, 03:47 PM
Why did FIFA lift the most recent ban on the NFF over the flawed elections???

Govt departments / parastatals owning FCs may be acceptable in our current state of (under)-development. However, the actual control of the NFF need not be under the govt, if we want to fall in line with FIFA rules.

Some people went to court and FIFA banned. They withdrew their actions and FIFA lifted the ban.

FIFA cannot eat its cake and have it. It is either government removes its hands from football matters or it is involved. There can be no halfway. FIFA should provide incentive for private companies to take over the clubs or allow Nigeria some level of interference by government.

No Smoking
Dec 20, 2011, 10:32 PM
Kai. Mikki, you just cannot be serious. Nor be by force.

If Nigeria is not able to organise and run a private sector league, let them fold it up. The citizens already have their favourite foreign clubs to follow.

FIFA ko, LAFA ni.... :lol:

Bunch17
Dec 21, 2011, 06:56 PM
I recently attended an event in a school in Nigeria. The students had produced a magazine on a variety of very interesting topics. It had a page covering the Premiership, not the Nigerian Premiership but the English premier league.

Later on, I was listening to a radio station Cool FM's sports phone in program and all that was discussed were the English Premier League and the World Club Championship finals, not a mention of a Nigeria team.

Does anyone still think the problems in Nigerian football still lie with NFF?

Exxcuzme
Dec 21, 2011, 09:20 PM
I recently attended an event in a school in Nigeria. The students had produced a magazine on a variety of very interesting topics. It had a page covering the Premiership, not the Nigerian Premiership but the English premier league.

Later on, I was listening to a radio station Cool FM's sports phone in program and all that was discussed were the English Premier League and the World Club Championship finals, not a mention of a Nigeria team.

Does anyone still think the problems in Nigerian football still lie with NFF?

Yes, NFF and it government sponsor

Mikky jaga
Dec 22, 2011, 09:14 AM
I recently attended an event in a school in Nigeria. The students had produced a magazine on a variety of very interesting topics. It had a page covering the Premiership, not the Nigerian Premiership but the English premier league.

Later on, I was listening to a radio station Cool FM's sports phone in program and all that was discussed were the English Premier League and the World Club Championship finals, not a mention of a Nigeria team.

Does anyone still think the problems in Nigerian football still lie with NFF?

Yes, NFF

EPL spent real money promoting their football, putting the league on Radio and TV worldwide, even on internet, how will people not talk of EPL?

It was Radio Nigeria that promoted the likes of 'mathematical' Odegbami, 'Chairman' Chukwu, 'Chief Justice' Adokiye etc. Toda, NPL is no longer on Radio Nigeria, not to talk of beaming it live on TV. Supersport is trying to show some selected matches, but these are very inadequate and cannot be compared to listening to your team play live on radio.

So, if NPL wants people to talk about Nigerian league, they must do much more to advertise it.