PDA

View Full Version : Nigeria finally lands one of the losing coaches



Mikky jaga
Feb 27, 2010, 05:22 PM
Well, a coach that could not lead his country to SA has finally landed the Eagle's job. He is to be assisted by a Nigerian coach that has not none any serious coaching in the past 3 years. Nigeria we hail thee.



Nigeria pick Lagerback

Nigeria have picked Swede Lars Lagerback and signed him on an initial 5-month deal to take the Super Eagles to the World Cup in South Africa later this year.

Lagerback, who coached his native Sweden for nine years, was picked ahead of fellow Swede Sven Goran Eriksson, Englishman Glen Hoddle, Serb Ratomir Djukovic and Frenchman Bruno Metsu.

He will be assisted by Austin Eguavoen, Daniel Amokachi and Alloy Agu as Nigerian assistants.

The Swede was the last of the five candidates to arrive Abuja and was interviewed on Friday afternoon.

NFF official Tunde Aderibigbe told KickOffNigeria.com that Lagerback both surprised and impressed the NFF's selection panel not only with his deep understanding of Nigerian football and its problems, but also with the solutions he provided to tackle the issues.

"He broke down and analysed the Nigerian team, and analysed the players from as far back as 2002 when Sweden met Nigeria at the World Cup, to the current team and players.

"He went on to identify the problems with Nigerian football and set out specific ideas for solving the problems,

"And then he set specific targets and timelines to meet those targets. His presentation was brilliant and showed that he came prepared.

"The panel were surprised at his knowledge and impressed at his delivery."

The executive committee of the Nigeria Football Association subsequently went into an eight-hour meeting before announcing Lagerback as the new coach.

Lagerback started his international coaching career at cadet level with the Swedish football Association in 1990, before taking over the B national team in 1996.

In 1998, he was picked as assistant coach for the A team by Tommy Soderberg and promoted to co-coach in 2000. In 2004, he was given full responsibility when Soderberg left to manage the Under 21 team.

During his time, Sweden qualified for an unprecedented five major championships.

He resigned as manager in 2009 after Sweden's failure to qualify for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.


Source Kick off .com

No Smoking
Feb 27, 2010, 10:33 PM
Lagerback, who coached his native Sweden for nine years, was picked ahead of fellow Swede Sven Goran Eriksson, Englishman Glen Hoddle, Serb Ratomir Djukovic and Frenchman Bruno Metsu.
............
The Swede was the last of the five candidates to arrive Abuja and was interviewed on Friday afternoon.

Did Djukovic eventually travel to Abuja for an interview?.. :confused1


He will be assisted by Austin Eguavoen, Daniel Amokachi and Alloy Agu as Nigerian assistants.

Have all three obtained coaching badges?

If Lagerback performed as well as reported at his interview, maybe he deserves a chance. Sven would have been a distraction, Glenn was confused as an England manager (I t'ink 'e go appoint Ifa priest as member of 'im backroom staff).

Ajibs
Feb 27, 2010, 11:11 PM
MJ,
I am reposting here what I said on the main page story on this news...


SBI,
Indeed you have noted facts. And yes facts need to be considered in this issue. But the problem is, it is also a FACT that Amodu was simply not good enough. Chiekena.

For me, its like you take an exam and you can very well score 40 and say you passed the exam! why could you not score 75 or 90? It is as though we have settled for mediocrity. If Amodu was so great why have so many Nigerians been calling for his head, despite his "laudable" credentials?

We may be wrong, but it appears that the team we have now can achieve far better than we have currently produced, they are capable of scoring 80 and not 40 all the time in their exams. Also consider the fact that we are ONLY attending this World Cup due to the foolishness of Tunisia losing to Mozambique.

IF you want to point to a team that is scoring 80 consistently look no further than Egypt. Yes they did not qualify for the World Cup, (and it took a replay of the game on neutral ground to knock them out, and they came back and hammerd the SAME team 4-0 at the ANC) so should Shetatha be sacked? Do you realize in the just concluded ANC in Angola, Egypt only conceded TWO goals in the whole competition! One from Obasi of Nigeria and the other an own goal their captain scored. Before he himself going on to hammer two past Cameroon. Yet they scored 15 goals in the same tournament. Your Amodu's Nigeria could only get past Zambia on penalties.

Now consider their team (Egypt) has many locally based players, so as some have argued, the Nigerian league is partially to blame here. But the point I am making with the local players is you do not need to have ALL World Class players to have a World Class team. You need good players and a World Class coach. Amodu is not a World Class coach.

I will say this, maybe Lagerback is the wrong choice, maybe he has not won as many trophies as Amodu, but Amodu needed to be fired, that much I know. Thank God the NFF for once acted quickly even if late.

Now I want to poinit something out to you, Of all the African Countries going to the World Cup, which ones boast of "winning coaches"? or "know names" in soccer? Ghana who made it to the final is their coach a "World Class winning coach"?

No Smoking
Feb 28, 2010, 07:58 PM
Now consider their team (Egypt) has many locally based players, so as some have argued, the Nigerian league is partially to blame here. But the point I am making with the local players is you do not need to have ALL World Class players to have a World Class team. You need good players and a World Class coach. Amodu is not a World Class coach.

I will say this, maybe Lagerback is the wrong choice, maybe he has not won as many trophies as Amodu, but Amodu needed to be fired, that much I know. Thank God the NFF for once acted quickly even if late


Of all the African Countries going to the World Cup, which ones boast of "winning coaches"? or "know names" in soccer? Ghana who made it to the final is their coach a "World Class winning coach"?

N.A.R, there's an own-goal in your argument. Abi yu get somet'ing personal against Amodu??? (Laik Wayne Bridge v John Terry) :rolleyes: :lol:

Mikky jaga
Mar 1, 2010, 06:20 AM
Lagerback, who coached his native Sweden for nine years, was picked ahead of fellow Swede Sven Goran Eriksson, Englishman Glen Hoddle, Serb Ratomir Djukovic and Frenchman Bruno Metsu.

A coach that led his country for nine years and could not qualify them for the world cup is a disaster in waiting for the Super Eagles.

How I wish a Nigerian coach is left in charge for half that time. I bet he will perform wonders. Amodu spent less than 2 years after the disaster called Dirty Vorts, and led the Eagles to her second appearance at the Mundial. Personalizing issues and low self esteem is killing Nigerian football.

Bunch17
Mar 1, 2010, 09:18 AM
A coach that led his country for nine years and could not qualify them for the world cup is a disaster in waiting for the Super Eagles.

.

Stop being too emotive. Don't let emotion get in the way of facts.

omaks
Mar 1, 2010, 10:16 AM
For what it's worth, Lagerback is a decent coach who had modest results with limited resources. If we are dreaming of winning the world cup in south Africa at all, even before employing Lagerback, then i would say emphatically that 'all of that is an impossible dream'. We have failed to prepare ourselves for such a dreanm over the years, and so it's not a reasonable dream to have. If we are after a decent showing in south Africa 2010, then i will say it's a possibility not an assurance. Amodu wasn't a falure by any means, that is certain. He may lack the appropriate knowledge to perform far better than he has, but in spite of his inadequacies he was able to attain most of the targets set for him by the NFF.

Kenn
Mar 1, 2010, 12:06 PM
.

Bunch,


...Don't let emotion get in the way of facts.

You took the words right out of my 'mouth'!:lol:

..

Kenn
Mar 1, 2010, 12:19 PM
Nice to see Eguavoen is part of his team. He's presently doing his UEFA B badges. I would have also wanted Siasia somewhere in there; but it's good news still. Nice.

Mikky jaga
Mar 1, 2010, 01:40 PM
Stop being too emotive. Don't let emotion get in the way of facts.

Which facts? Which emotion? Are these facts about Laggerback true or false?


Lagerback, who coached his native Sweden for nine years, was picked ahead of fellow Swede Sven Goran Eriksson, Englishman Glen Hoddle, Serb Ratomir Djukovic and Frenchman Bruno Metsu.

During his time, Sweden qualified for an unprecedented five major championships.

He resigned as manager in 2009 after Sweden's failure to qualify for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

Who is being emotive, who is being factual here? Anti Amodu crowd, anything whiteman is better!!

Kenn
Mar 1, 2010, 02:26 PM
.


Mikky Jaga,


Stop being too emotive. Don't let emotion get in the way of facts.-Bunch


Which facts? Which emotion? Are these facts about Laggerback true or false?




Lagerback, who coached his native Sweden for nine years, was picked ahead of fellow Swede Sven Goran Eriksson, Englishman Glen Hoddle, Serb Ratomir Djukovic and Frenchman Bruno Metsu.

During his time, Sweden qualified for an unprecedented five major championships.

He resigned as manager in 2009 after Sweden's failure to qualify for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.


Who is being emotive, who is being factual here? Anti Amodu crowd, anything whiteman is better!!


Sorry O, Mikky Jaga, but you remind me of one common joke about Nigerians:

Reporter (interviewing a Nigerian): Is it true that Nigerians like to answer questions with questions?

Nigerian: Who told you that?


Isn't it nice to see you confirm what Bunch is saying with your last post? It's unfortunate that you're seeing "white" and "black" in this affair. Some of us simply see competence, knowledge, capability and, of course, personality to fit the job.

Let me give you two example of how some of us think:

If the Frenchman of Malian origin, Jean Tigana had been on that shortlist, some of us would have rooted for him ahead of Lagerback, not because he's black or on paper actually better than any of the other chaps on that shortlist (including Lagerback), but because knowing his football philosophy, his legendary playing status, his qualifications as a coach at the top level in Europe, his relative success in top-level club football in France, England and Turkey and the respect he commands from players, he would have been an ideal candidate to inspire the Super Eagles. It wouldn't have nattered to me that he has not won much as a coach or that he has not handled a national team before.

Again, another example is if a man like John Barnes has made the shortlist along with these others. I wouldn't have supported him, even though he was a great player and has club and national team coaching experience. I wouldn't matter to me at all that he is a black man. I will choose a Lagerback ahead of him because whether as Celtic, Jamaica or Tranmere manager, he showed nothing to indicate that he can withstand the demands and pressure of coaching.

So, go ahead thinking in the simplistic light of white and black; some of us understand the complexities of football management better than that. Of course, it's okay to come to a forum and vent all your anti-imperialist anger; but please, express them in the right places. It has no room here.


CHEERS!
..

Mikky jaga
Mar 1, 2010, 04:30 PM
.


Mikky Jaga,







Sorry O, Mikky Jaga, but you remind me of one common joke about Nigerians:

Reporter (interviewing a Nigerian): Is it true that Nigerians like to answer questions with questions?

Nigerian: Who told you that?


Isn't it nice to see you confirm what Bunch is saying with your last post? It's unfortunate that you're seeing "white" and "black" in this affair. Some of us simply see competence, knowledge, capability and, of course, personality to fit the job.

Let me give you two example of how some of us think:

If the Frenchman of Malian origin, Jean Tigana had been on that shortlist, some of us would have rooted for him ahead of Lagerback, not because he's black or on paper actually better than any of the other chaps on that shortlist (including Lagerback), but because knowing his football philosophy, his legendary playing status, his qualifications as a coach at the top level in Europe, his relative success in top-level club football in France, England and Turkey and the respect he commands from players, he would have been an ideal candidate to inspire the Super Eagles. It wouldn't have nattered to me that he has not won much as a coach or that he has not handled a national team before.

Again, another example is if a man like John Barnes has made the shortlist along with these others. I wouldn't have supported him, even though he was a great player and has club and national team coaching experience. I wouldn't matter to me at all that he is a black man. I will choose a Lagerback ahead of him because whether as Celtic, Jamaica or Tranmere manager, he showed nothing to indicate that he can withstand the demands and pressure of coaching.

So, go ahead thinking in the simplistic light of white and black; some of us understand the complexities of football management better than that. Of course, it's okay to come to a forum and vent all your anti-imperialist anger; but please, express them in the right places. It has no room here.


CHEERS!
..

Sorry I still do not get how you guys think.

A man living on past glories, who may indeed be on the downward path in his career is the best for your country?

He was, he was, he was... just like Kanu was... and Okocha was...

The fact remains that he has been jobless since 2009 when he resigned his job after failing to lead his country to the WC. Other right thinking people looking for world class coach left the aging man alone for Nigeria to snap up. Even Hinddick that still had a contract with Russia has been snapped up. (By the way he too is a losing coach).

How I wish it was when he was still tactically strong, leading his country to international competitions that Nigeria went for him. But, of course his country would not allow him. But now that his output is dwindling as witnessed by his failure to qualify his country for the WC, he is free to coach a third rate country like Nigeria.

Kenn
Mar 1, 2010, 04:56 PM
.


Mikky Jaga,


Sorry I still do not get how you guys think.

A man living on past glories, who may indeed be on the downward path in his career is the best for your country?

He was, he was, he was... just like Kanu was... and Okocha was...


What past glory are you talking about? And is part of the problem with Amodu not the fact that having being this long in the national set-up, he still cannot find capable replacements for the Kanus and the Okochas of the aging national team?



The fact remains that he has been jobless since 2009 when he resigned his job after failing to lead his country to the WC. Other right thinking people looking for world class coach left the aging man alone for Nigeria to snap up. Even Hinddick that still had a contract with Russia has been snapped up. (By the way he too is a losing coach).

Your comment on Hiddink shows you know nothing about football. Listen, Lagerback resigned as coach of his national side in October 2009, but remained employed by the Swedish FA up until he took this Super Eagles job. More importantly, anyone who knows how football works would recognise that at the time of the search for a new national coach, we were not likely to get any bigger name, but those out of job or nominally employed because the top leagues are in mid-season and being a World Cup year, top-top coaches would have been snapped up. If you consider those available for the job out there, Lagerback is a brilliant choice.



How I wish it was when he was still tactically strong, leading his country to international competitions that Nigeria went for him. But, of course his country would not allow him. But now that his output is dwindling as witnessed by his failure to qualify his country for the WC, he is free to coach a third rate country like Nigeria.

Now, it is my turn to say I don't get how you think...:lol:


..


...

omaks
Mar 2, 2010, 08:02 AM
Sorry I still do not get how you guys think.

A man living on past glories, who may indeed be on the downward path in his career is the best for your country?

He was, he was, he was... just like Kanu was... and Okocha was...

The fact remains that he has been jobless since 2009 when he resigned his job after failing to lead his country to the WC. Other right thinking people looking for world class coach left the aging man alone for Nigeria to snap up. Even Hinddick that still had a contract with Russia has been snapped up. (By the way he too is a losing coach).

How I wish it was when he was still tactically strong, leading his country to international competitions that Nigeria went for him. But, of course his country would not allow him. But now that his output is dwindling as witnessed by his failure to qualify his country for the WC, he is free to coach a third rate country like Nigeria.

Mikky, i beg to differ on the first highlighted point above. You see, the fact that Lagerback resigned immediately his quest for world Cup qualification ended actually shows that he has recognised after so many years that he has taken Sweden as far as he possibly can. That is a different mentality to our local coaches wwho will cling on to their jobs at any costs, even if doing so is detrimental to the progress of the team. To qualify Sweden for sucessive world cup and european championships, with limited resources is a success in its own right. that is why i also think Amodu too had some measure of success. Lagerback is a decent enough coach. Who heard of Clemence Westerhoff before he landed on the Nigerian Shores years ago? Who had heard of Bonfrere Jo? In their own rights they were successful too.

Being out of a job since October 2009 or so isn't quite a long time, and it certainly doesn't mean Lagerback has lost his knowledge over such a short period of time. Sometimes you need knew challenges to regain the enthusiasm you have for your vocation. i will not be too surprised this is the case with Lagerback. How were you able to measure whether he had indeed lost his tactical strenght, and to what degree.

I would have preferred Amodu to be in the party to South Africa in some way, but the fact of the matter is that he had done his leve best, and i think the man can be proud of his achievements with the limited ability that he has. It's water under the bridge now anyway, so let's give Lagerback our support.

Mikky jaga
Mar 2, 2010, 08:29 AM
Mikky, i beg to differ on the first highlighted point above. You see, the fact that Lagerback resigned immediately his quest for world Cup qualification ended actually shows that he has recognised after so many years that he has taken Sweden as far as he possibly can. That is a different mentality to our local coaches wwho will cling on to their jobs at any costs, even if doing so is detrimental to the progress of the team.

Can you please point to one local coach that was allowed to determine he had taken Eagles so far and refused to resign? Most of these guys are hounded out once they lose a match, even friendly games. You are not being fair to our coaches with that statement.


To qualify Sweden for sucessive world cup and european championships, with limited resources is a success in its own right. that is why i also think Amodu too had some measure of success. Lagerback is a decent enough coach. Who heard of Clemence Westerhoff before he landed on the Nigerian Shores years ago? Who had heard of Bonfrere Jo? In their own rights they were successful too.


Which limited resources are you talking about? Human, material or financial? How do you determine limited resources?


Being out of a job since October 2009 or so isn't quite a long time, and it certainly doesn't mean Lagerback has lost his knowledge over such a short period of time. Sometimes you need knew challenges to regain the enthusiasm you have for your vocation. i will not be too surprised this is the case with Lagerback. How were you able to measure whether he had indeed lost his tactical strenght, and to what degree.

Who says his being out of job caused his deterioration? Rather his perceived deterioration caused his being out of job. I this period when countries are rebuilding their teams against future competitions, no good coach stays out of job for close to six months. Yes, he needs Nigeria to rediscover himself and after use that as a springboard to more lucrative contracts in Europe, which is what will happen if by any chance he makes a success of this golden offer given him by Nigeria. Of course, we will pay for him to rediscover himself too.



I would have preferred Amodu to be in the party to South Africa in some way, but the fact of the matter is that he had done his leve best, and i think the man can be proud of his achievements with the limited ability that he has. It's water under the bridge now anyway, so let's give Lagerback our support.

And how do you know Amodu has done his level best? Some felt he should not take us to AFCON because he had done his level best. They felt we would be disgraced at AFCON, but were disappointed when the guy won the bronze. Who knows, he could have disappointed his critics if he was allowed to go to the WC? Whatever Lagger back achieve in this WC, there is no saying Amodu could not have done better - he was not allowed.

Give Laggerback my support? Not for this WC. If he needs my support, let him take the Eagles to next AFCON, win the cup and then qualify Nigeria for the next WC, then he will get my support 100%. For now, he is just an opportunist, reaping where he did not sow.

Kenn
Mar 4, 2010, 02:24 AM
Give Laggerback my support? Not for this WC. If he needs my support, let him take the Eagles to next AFCON, win the cup and then qualify Nigeria for the next WC, then he will get my support 100%. For now, he is just an opportunist, reaping where he did not sow.

You want him to do all the above with a 5-month contract? And if by some miracle he takes care of that laundry list, would that mean he was never "an opportunist, reaping where he did not sow"? :confused1

..

So Sue Me
Mar 6, 2010, 12:03 AM
Every incompetent European coach now knows that he can always get a job coaching an African national team. It never ceases to amaze me how many Africans somehow think that embracing everything foreign, even when what they embrace is comepletely useless, makes them cool.

And we have the audacity to complain about racism? If a white man had fired a Black man who has qualified his country for the world cup twice and replaced him with a White man who failed to quality his, we would be screaming racism all over the ****ing place. But we conveniently overlook the racism we practise against other Black people.

You can be the former captain of your national team and qualify a minnow in African soccer like Togo for the world cup and still be replaced by an incompetent oaf simply because the oaf has White skin. We can try to rationalize this abomination all we want. We will never escape the fact that we consider ourselves slaves who are only good enough to carry the White man's bags.

Why wasn't Siasa, a man who has played for the national team and whose Olympic sqaud only lost to soccer powerhouse, Argentina, hired for the job? Oh I forgot, he is Black. In fact, he is very dark.

May all the people who support this atrocity experience the same racism that we inflicted on Amodu. May all the people who replace accomplish Black coaches with incompetent White failures be humiliated at airport check points because they are Black. Many Nigerians are justifying this blatant act of Black-on-Black racism while foreign observers are scratching their heads wondering why Africans engage incompetent foreigners to replace accomplish indigenous coaches.

I will not be watching this world cup. I will boycott it in protest against racism being perpetrated by Black men against other Black men. I did not watch the 2002 world cup, so it will be no big deal for me. May those clowns who are giving our money to this mercenary who would be preparing Sweden for the world cup if he knew what he was doing experience nothing but racism everytime they travel.

I spit on the NFF.

Kenn
Mar 6, 2010, 03:58 AM
Every incompetent European coach now knows that he can always get a job coaching an African national team. It never ceases to amaze me how many Africans somehow think that embracing everything foreign, even when what they embrace is comepletely useless, makes them cool.

And we have the audacity to complain about racism? If a white man had fired a Black man who has qualified his country for the world cup twice and replaced him with a White man who failed to quality his, we would be screaming racism all over the ****ing place. But we conveniently overlook the racism we practise against other Black people.


In 1997 when Bonfere Jo was sacked and replaced by Amodu, did we hear a squeak about racism from anyone? In 1998, when Philippe Troussier was sacked and replaced by Monday Sinclair, was there any complaint about racism? In 1990, when Manfred Hoener was fired and replaced with Paul Hamilton, did we hear chants of racism? In 2008, when Berti Vogt was fired and Amodu replaced him, how many "No to Racism" placards did we count on the internet or on the ground?



You can be the former captain of your national team and qualify a minnow in African soccer like Togo for the world cup and still be replaced by an incompetent oaf simply because the oaf has White skin. We can try to rationalize this abomination all we want. We will never escape the fact that we consider ourselves slaves who are only good enough to carry the White man's bags.

Talk for yourself about being slave. Stephen Keshi's sack by Togo was clearly because he couldn't get the team to work at the 2006 African Nations Cup where they lost to Angola, Congo and Cameroon and crashed out with zero point! To compound that, there was a players' revolt led by Adebayor. It was clear that his position became untenable thereafter. He didn't have the results and he didn't have the player's confidence. There was clearly no chance that he was the man to lead them to the World Cup even though he helped secure the qualifications. Otto Pfister may have been a white man, but that is clearly not the reason for his appointment. He was no "incompetent oaf" either. He was chosen because he is one of the most successful coaches working in Africa then and its hard to see any coach who can match his record in Africa. Keshi worked as Mali's national coach for the past two years, but their African Cup of Nations results weren't impressive as well and he was sacked. This is the way of football. There's always a high turnover of coaches, because it is a result-driven business.



Why wasn't Siasa, a man who has played for the national team and whose Olympic sqaud only lost to soccer powerhouse, Argentina, hired for the job? Oh I forgot, he is Black. In fact, he is very dark.

No! He can't do it now. An Olympic team and a senior national squad are two different teams. He should go get his coaching badges and gain more experience and yeah, he can try. He's young, inventive and ambitious; so, let him earn his spurs first.



May all the people who support this atrocity experience the same racism that we inflicted on Amodu.

Haha


May all the people who replace accomplish Black coaches with incompetent White failures be humiliated at airport check points because they are Black.

Incompetent? How about the incompetent black coaches? Anyway, as far as some of us are concerned, Lagerback has not been proven to be incompetent, because he has just been appointed to the job. The proof of his pudding will be in the eating!



Many Nigerians are justifying this blatant act of Black-on-Black racism while foreign observers are scratching their heads wondering why Africans engage incompetent foreigners to replace accomplish indigenous coaches.

Which foreign observers?



I will not be watching this world cup. I will boycott it in protest against racism being perpetrated by Black men against other Black men.

Shame; but don't worry, we won't miss you.



I did not watch the 2002 world cup, so it will be no big deal for me.

Ha! That's a full decade without a glance at the Mundial? You must be Superman!:surprised:eek:



May those clowns who are giving our money to this mercenary who would be preparing Sweden for the world cup if he knew what he was doing experience nothing but racism everytime they travel.

Point of correction. Lars Lagerback is not a mercenary. He is the coach of the greatest team from Africa! S-U-P-E-R EAGLES! In case you haven't noticed, he wears our colours!



I spit on the NFF.

Soar! Eagles, soar!:hail::hail::hail:

(No amount of bad-belle will stop us:lol:)


...

Mikky jaga
Mar 6, 2010, 08:36 AM
In 1997 when Bonfere Jo was sacked and replaced by Amodu, did we hear a squeak about racism from anyone? In 1998, when Philippe Troussier was sacked and replaced by Monday Sinclair, was there any complaint about racism? In 1990, when Manfred Hoener was fired and replaced with Paul Hamilton, did we hear chants of racism? In 2008, when Berti Vogt was fired and Amodu replaced him, how many "No to Racism" placards did we count on the internet or on the ground?




Talk for yourself about being slave. Stephen Keshi's sack by Togo was clearly because he couldn't get the team to work at the 2006 African Nations Cup where they lost to Angola, Congo and Cameroon and crashed out with zero point! To compound that, there was a players' revolt led by Adebayor. It was clear that his position became untenable thereafter. He didn't have the results and he didn't have the player's confidence. There was clearly no chance that he was the man to lead them to the World Cup even though he helped secure the qualifications. Otto Pfister may have been a white man, but that is clearly not the reason for his appointment. He was no "incompetent oaf" either. He was chosen because he is one of the most successful coaches working in Africa then and its hard to see any coach who can match his record in Africa. Keshi worked as Mali's national coach for the past two years, but their African Cup of Nations results weren't impressive as well and he was sacked. This is the way of football. There's always a high turnover of coaches, because it is a result-driven business.




No! He can't do it now. An Olympic team and a senior national squad are two different teams. He should go get his coaching badges and gain more experience and yeah, he can try. He's young, inventive and ambitious; so, let him earn his spurs first.




Haha



Incompetent? How about the incompetent black coaches? Anyway, as far as some of us are concerned, Lagerback has not been proven to be incompetent, because he has just been appointed to the job. The proof of his pudding will be in the eating!




Which foreign observers?




Shame; but don't worry, we won't miss you.




Ha! That's a full decade without a glance at the Mundial? You must be Superman!:surprised:eek:




Point of correction. Lars Lagerback is not a mercenary. He is the coach of the greatest team from Africa! S-U-P-E-R EAGLES! In case you haven't noticed, he wears our colours!




Soar! Eagles, soar!:hail::hail::hail:

(No amount of bad-belle will stop us:lol:)


...

One quick question. Has Nigeria ever sacked a white coach before? Or did they dump us for better offers elsewhere? The only exception I can recollect is the Dirty Vorts guy who was sacked because Glo refused to continue to pay his exorbitant wage for doing nothing.

When brainwashed people talk, I just shake my head in amazement at how black man hates his fellow black.

Kenn
Mar 6, 2010, 11:29 AM
One quick question. Has Nigeria ever sacked a white coach before? Or did they dump us for better offers elsewhere? The only exception I can recollect is the Dirty Vorts guy who was sacked because Glo refused to continue to pay his exorbitant wage for doing nothing.

When brainwashed people talk, I just shake my head in amazement at how black man hates his fellow black.

Hey, black man hating his fellow black man, how many times will you break your promise not to engage me on this coach thing? And since you know (or think) Nigeria has never sacked a white coach before (apart from whoever you mentioned), why did you come here asking me or anyone the “quick question”? Anyway, I would have ignored you if not for your silly insult about "brainwashed people". If anybody is brainwashed it's got to be you. Decent people have been engaging in this debate on both sides of the divide, agreeing and disagreeing, without insulting each other; but your type does not know how to engage in a public debate without exhibiting their lack of class. After all, what do I expect from someone who’s hitting his head against a wall for a clueless coach who self-confessedly depends on pastors and spiritualists to win matches for him?

...

No Smoking
Mar 6, 2010, 01:40 PM
In 1990, when Manfred Hoener was fired and replaced with Paul Hamilton....

Kenn, I envy your history of Naija footie... :)

I want to discuss the inadequate support NFA/NFF gives local coaches. Paul Hamilton was so stripped of support that he was using his private van to collect the national team players for training sessions.

At the end, after qualifying the Eagles for the Nations' Cup, he was replaced by Westerhof. As usual, the NFA people began jumping at Westerhof's demands for funds and equipment. He yelled at them and they delivered.

We seem to prefer being commanded: "Apes Obey" instead of working harmoniously with our local talents.

Bunch17
Mar 6, 2010, 02:03 PM
At the end, after qualifying the Eagles for the Nations' Cup, he was replaced by Westerhof. As usual, the NFA people began jumping at Westerhof's demands for funds and equipment. He yelled at them and they delivered.


Not entirely correct. Hamilton was fired for failing to qualify for the 1990 world cup.

Now on the case of NFA and Westerhof, it was obvious that the NFA wanted him fired as soon as he started work. They orchestrated the campaingn in the press to get him removed. He would have been fired if not for Aikhomu. So when giving credit to those who helped develop our football, credit should also go to Aikhomu.

He was key in stopping the frequent junkets to Europe to "invite" our players instead relying on the good old fax machine. Naturally a few people were not pleased!

Mikky jaga
Mar 6, 2010, 03:14 PM
Hey, black man hating his fellow black man, how many times will you break your promise not to engage me on this coach thing? And since you know (or think) Nigeria has never sacked a white coach before (apart from whoever you mentioned), why did you come here asking me or anyone the “quick question”? Anyway, I would have ignored you if not for your silly insult about "brainwashed people". If anybody is brainwashed it's got to be you. Decent people have been engaging in this debate on both sides of the divide, agreeing and disagreeing, without insulting each other; but your type does not know how to engage in a public debate without exhibiting their lack of class. After all, what do I expect from someone who’s hitting his head against a wall for a clueless coach who self-confessedly depends on pastors and spiritualists to win matches for him?

...

Sorry, you missed it entirely.

I promised not to engage you in your line of thinking on that your thread, or write up and I have kept to that. This is another story altogether. Thank you.

I never knew to be brainwashed was an insult to you. I even thought you would recieve it with thanks, but you never know how people take these things. Pele o. Ndo. sorry o, Alagba Kenn.

About Amodu using voodoo or pastors to win matches, what is wrong with that? He won his matches. Simple. Let's see how your laggerback of a coach performs against Argentina, Greece and S. Korea. I wish him the success he could not record against Denmark and Portugal in the qualifiers.

Bunch17
Mar 6, 2010, 03:44 PM
About Amodu using voodoo or pastors to win matches, what is wrong with that? He won his matches. Simple.

This comes from a self acclaimed man of God. Surely he could not have meant it.

No Smoking
Mar 6, 2010, 03:51 PM
Not entirely correct. Hamilton was fired for failing to qualify for the 1990 world cup.

Na so? But he qualified for the Nations' Cup (Dakar?), using his own van, only to have Westerhof take charge. Abeg, Kenn, come deliver me from Bunch o... :D

Bunch17
Mar 6, 2010, 04:05 PM
Na so? But he qualified for the Nations' Cup (Dakar?), using his own van, only to have Westerhof take charge. Abeg, Kenn, come deliver me from Bunch o... :D

Yes he qualified for the ANC but what the country wanted then was a world cup slot as by then we had never been.

As to his van, I don't doubt you at all. So Kenn need not deliver you.

Mikky jaga
Mar 6, 2010, 04:27 PM
This comes from a self acclaimed man of God. Surely he could not have meant it.

Sorry, are you referring to Da Bishop or Vade Mecun? Can't remember when we talked along that line last.

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 12:42 AM
.



Mikky Jaga,


Sorry, you missed it entirely.

I promised not to engage you in your line of thinking on that your thread, or write up and I have kept to that. This is another story altogether. Thank you.


Why are you lying to yourself? Are you expecting the evidence to disappear? Below is the thread. Let your words there judge you. Anyone interested can read and judge for themselves:


http://nigeriavillagesquare.com/forum/articles-comments/48752-comment-footballing-jingoism.html



I never knew to be brainwashed was an insult to you. I even thought you would recieve it with thanks, but you never know how people take these things. Pele o. Ndo. sorry o, Alagba Kenn.

Yeah, that shows your level of intelligence. It's a pity you can't offer anything more.



About Amodu using voodoo or pastors to win matches, what is wrong with that? He won his matches. Simple. Let's see how your laggerback of a coach performs against Argentina, Greece and S. Korea. I wish him the success he could not record against Denmark and Portugal in the qualifiers.

It's enough you wish him success.…



CHEERS!

...

NoLongThing
Mar 7, 2010, 01:33 AM
Without being too sentimental or anything of that sort, the fact is that Amodu despite qualifying Nigeria for the world cup and clinching the third spot at the ANC demonstrated a dearth of tactical knowledge in many matches and should have rightly been replaced although I submit that it was done too late in the day - it should have been much earlier. However the failure to act before the ANC in my opinion, means that the guy should have been allowed to conclude his work with a technical director to help out until the world cup or even with the system the French have adopted vis a vis Domenech!

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 02:24 AM
Without being too sentimental or anything of that sort, the fact is that Amodu despite qualifying Nigeria for the world cup and clinching the third spot at the ANC demonstrated a dearth of tactical knowledge in many matches and should have rightly been replaced although I submit that it was done too late in the day - it should have been much earlier. However the failure to act before the ANC in my opinion, means that the guy should have been allowed to conclude his work with a technical director to help out until the world cup or even with the system the French have adopted vis a vis Domenech!

When you speak of "the system the French have adopted vis a vis Domenech", are you referring to the idea of appointing and naming his successor before the World Cup, but allowing Domenech to still take the team to the tournament? Well, Domenech took France to the final of the last World Cup when no one gave them a chance after the horror show of 2002, so he deserves to be given the respect of taking them there. Despite the whole debate about Domenech, he's showed he can do it at the grandest stage of them all. That's enough.

With Amodu we are on a hiding to nothing heading to the World Cup. His tactical ineptitude and lack of respect from players were clear factors that would have seen us exit the World Cup without a whimper. So, why not put him out of his misery, even if belatedly? We are not likely to perform any worse with a new man late in the day; so, why not get on with the change? Of course, I personally would have preferred the new person to have taken charge before Angola. That way he would have been able to understand the players and see them through one test of a competition and proper preparation before the World Cup. Now, they've given him an uphill task. But I would rather have this than Amodu take us to the World Cup.

There is no use appointing a Technical Adviser to work with Amodu, because someone has to be in control of the team effectively. For a collegiate system to work, both of them need to know the team fully and understand each others strengths and weaknesses in order to understand who does what with the team to complement each other without getting in each other's way. Again, the timing of the appointment made that an unworkable and unrealistic suggestion.

To me, Amodu even working with the B team now is not a progressive idea since he has repeatedly stated himself that he does not watch the domestic league because there's no quality. Someone like Siasia or Eguavoen who have better knowledge of the domestic league currently would have been better. Nonetheless I'm hoping that as one of Lagerback's assistants, Eguavoen would help in this area. While I am not too confident that a lot of them will break into the first team squad at this World Cup, I do believe it is important that promising ones amongst them are given more opportunity to come to the national camp and mix up with others and fight for a place.



CHEERS!
..

Mikky jaga
Mar 7, 2010, 02:01 PM
.



mikky jaga,



why are you lying to yourself? Are you expecting the evidence to disappear? Below is the thread. Let your words there judge you. Anyone interested can read and judge for themselves:

if you did not understand what i wrote, you could have asked for my clarification rather than give your own interpretation and insult me by calling me liar. I hope to forgive you though, if you are man enough to say sorry, very nicely.


yeah, that shows your level of intelligence. It's a pity you can't offer anything more.

if you only offer half of the apologies i offered to you, i will rate your intelligence closer to average.




it's enough you wish him success.…

if only wishes were horses, lagerback would be leading sweden to the wc instead of hijacking what another had done.



cheers!

...

cheers to you too!

Mikky jaga
Mar 7, 2010, 02:13 PM
With Amodu we are on a hiding to nothing heading to the World Cup. His tactical ineptitude and lack of respect from players were clear factors that would have seen us exit the World Cup without a whimper. So, why not put him out of his misery, even if belatedly? We are not likely to perform any worse with a new man late in the day; so, why not get on with the change? Of course, I personally would have preferred the new person to have taken charge before Angola. That way he would have been able to understand the players and see them through one test of a competition and proper preparation before the World Cup. Now, they've given him an uphill task.

..

Yeah, the spin doctors are out with excuses for failure for Lagerback already. It's late in the day. What a shame!! Why not keep all the millions the guy would receive late in the day for soccer development in Nigeria if it is too late in the day for the hired mercenary to make any difference?



But I would rather have this than Amodu take us to the World Cup.
..

Of course, Amodu is a black face. How would Nigeria be showcasing a black face where all those white Oga massas are!! The Lagerback that did not show tactical ineptitude could do nothing to change the fortunes of his team when being whitewashed by Denmark both home and away in WC qualifier. He could also not do anything to break the deadlock against Portugal. But he has one thing in his favour that Amodu lacks - He is a white honkey.

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 03:03 PM
.


Mikky Jaga,



if you did not understand what i wrote, you could have asked for my clarification rather than give your own interpretation and insult me by calling me liar. I hope to forgive you though, if you are man enough to say sorry, very nicely.


Don't worry about explaining anything. I have put the link to what you wrote there, so that anyone interested can read and decide for themselves who between you and me is saying the truth. What the link shows is clear. You came into the thread "Footballing Jingoism" on March 1, 2010 to comment on what I wrote (your Post No 11). I responded to you on the same day (Post No 12). Almost 2 hours after my response, you replied with the following (Post no 13):

"I refuse to join issues with you on this coach thing again. But the bold part sums up my understanding of your lack of depth in what you chose to write about…." – Mikky Jaga

So, you see, contrary to your new claim that this was only in reference to the said thread, it is obvious that you are talking of not engaging me again on an issue ("this coach thing"), rather than in a section of the board. Despite stating the above, you came back about three hours later (Post No 15) to respond further to me, which prompted me to comment thus in Post No 16 when you accused me of being confused:

"You are the one evidently confused. One minute you're saying you refuse to join issues with me over this coach thing again, the next minute you are here responding to me. Make up your mind!" -Kenn

You responded the next day to explain that you only responded to me (after saying you won't engage me again on the coach issue) only to reciprocate my "Bye". Of course, this was a laughable excuse, as you said more than "Bye" and you really knew you should have kept your word. So, you can imagine my surprise when I came unto this thread yesterday to see that you are asking me one "quick question" on this same coach thing. I mean, I am always ready to discuss or debate with anyone who has the right temperament and attitude. Once you say you are not debating this with me anymore, I expect you to move on. If you cannot keep your own word to yourself, I wonder what else you can keep.:wink:

But, you know, you are my paddy.:D I will let you be.:hug: Just don't precipitately say you won't debate me again on an issue if you know you want to continue the debate. I like holding people to what they say. So, let's continue the debate in amity. You can call me all the choice names you want now and I will respond, as usual, with something mush more sensible.:wink: And one more thing, Lagerback did not hijack anything. He applied and got a job. The position of national coach or Technical Adviser to the Super Eagles is not Amodu's inheritance.



CHEERS!


Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 03:13 PM
Yeah, the spin doctors are out with excuses for failure for Lagerback already. It's late in the day. What a shame!! Why not keep all the millions the guy would receive late in the day for soccer development in Nigeria if it is too late in the day for the hired mercenary to make any difference?


No, it's no excuse. I have explained to you and anyone who wants to listen that I have faith in Lagerback. I have explained that he is big enough and experienced enough to handle the challenges. What I stated there is real; but they aren't excuses. They are challenges. These challenges will make our respectable outing at the World Cup more memorable. What you don't know is that some of us can read the signs better than others! South Africa here we come! S-U-P-E-R!!!:D:hail:



Of course, Amodu is a black face. How would Nigeria be showcasing a black face where all those white Oga massas are!! The Lagerback that did not show tactical ineptitude could do nothing to change the fortunes of his team when being whitewashed by Denmark both home and away in WC qualifier. He could also not do anything to break the deadlock against Portugal. But he has one thing in his favour that Amodu lacks - He is a white honkey.

First, get the meaning of the term "whitewashed". A team that loses a game with a goal difference cannot be said to have been whitewashed. And no, it is not about Amodu's colour or race. I am tired of having to repeat that. But, of course, you can go on believing what you want. It's a free world!



CHEERS!

...

Mikky jaga
Mar 7, 2010, 03:31 PM
Thank God you have finally agreed that action speaks louder than words. If I promised not to engage you and keeps on engaging you, common sense should teach that what the guy meant was not what you thought he meant. But you know, that thing is not actually common.

Now, let's see what you have to offer!!


No, it's no excuse. I have explained to you and anyone who wants to listen that I have faith in Lagerback. I have explained that he is big enough and experienced enough to handle the challenges. What I stated there is real; but they aren't excuses. They are challenges. These challenges will make our respectable outing at the World Cup more memorable. What you don't know is that some of us can read the signs better than others! South Africa here we come! S-U-P-E-R!!!:D:hail:

So, it's a matter of faith, thanks for the clarification. I have faith in Amodu too that whatever Lagerback achieves in SA, Amodu can do better.


First, get the meaning of the term "whitewashed". A team that loses a game with a goal difference cannot be said to have been whitewashed. And no, it is not about Amodu's colour or race. I am tired of having to repeat that. But, of course, you can go on believing what you want. It's a free world!

Of course, he was beaten black and blue, both home and away and he had no clue what to do to rescue his team. A team that beat you home and away in a WC qualifier actually whitewashed you, simple. I believe if Amodu was beaten home and away by Tunisia, you would also have faith in him. Now, I know how you select your coaches.


CHEERS!

...

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 04:32 PM
.


Mikky Jaga,


Thank God you have finally agreed that action speaks louder than words. If I promised not to engage you and keeps on engaging you, common sense should teach that what the guy meant was not what you thought he meant. But you know, that thing is not actually common.

Now, let's see what you have to offer!!

Now, let me get this straight - You make a promise (without being prompted) and after you break that promise, you accuse the person you made the promise to of lacking common sense for not understanding that you didn't mean to keep the promise? I mean, you are so full with this common sense that when you say you "promised" not to engage me and later broke this promise by engaging me, I (the one supposedly without any iota of common sense) should have known that what you meant was not what I thought you meant? Okay, I get it now! You are the King of Commons Sense; the wisest man this side of the universe. Keep it up!

(Some people no go kill me for the NVS. God deliver us from this Socrates them O!" Chei! Yoruba go say: "F'ọwọ ạrạ'ẹ şe rạ'ẹ- Take your own hand do yourself):lol:

Wonderful!:D

....

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 05:00 PM
http://odili.net/news/source/2010/mar/6/3.html


The Saturday Guardian, 6 March 2010

Lars Lagerback - A new dimension to Nigerian football!

By Segun Odegbami

Before I read his CV last week, Sweden's Lars Lagerback would have never entered my consciousness as the man to take up the job of coaching the Super Eagles of Nigeria.



A Swede coaching the Eagles? Who can that be?

Yes, I had read sparingly about him through the years of his work with the Swedish national team, particularly following the painful defeat the Eagles suffered when they played against his team in Japan at the 2002 World Cup.

That defeat was not surprising. The Scandinavian countries have always had our 'number'. Compared to other European countries Nigeria has never found it easy playing against them.

They are so boringly organised and disciplined that they would always expose Nigerian team's tactical naivety! Their approach to football is scientific. They analyse football with the use of computers. That's why a key and compulsory component of Lagerback's requirements is a computer analyst to work constantly with him.

The Scandinavians have the reputation of attempting to turn what is essentially an art form into data and statistics! Against teams that have no solid foundation in organised play, and team tactics are usually not their strong point, they would take one look at the team, observe their strengths and weaknesses, and adopt a disciplined style to always defeat them.

Even when the Eagles were a lot stronger than now, the team that created one of the most shocking results of the 1998 World Cup, beating 'hands down' the favourites, Spain, in the first round, the Danes took on the same Eagles, played one of the most tactical matches of the 1998 World Cup, and tore the Nigerian team to shreds in 90 minutes!

Nigerians hate to be reminded of that match. It knocked Nigeria out of the World Cup everyone was saying they could now win after they had rubbished Spain!

The Swedes, the Danes and the Norwegians are of similar stock, hewn and limited by the extreme cold conditions of their part of Western Europe.

Between the weather, their relatively small number, their pampered life style, buoyant economy, a total lack of motivation to succeed (they are already comfortable), slightly weaker leagues (compared to other European countries), they find the answer to why they are not dominant in football in Europe.

It is, therefore, understandable that to think of hiring a coach from that part of the world would never have crossed our minds in the first instance.

When Lagerback came into the picture it is not surprising that he 'stole' into it like a thief in the dark of night. Understandably also, no one gave him a chance! He was added to make up the numbers and give some credibility to the process of hiring Bruno Metsu, who was the preferred candidate at the start.

But then, Lagerback's records screamed for attention. His CV was submitted by an unknown Nigerian, a certain Emeka Enechi (not the renowned sports journalist) to the NFF and a close scrutiny started to reveal the depth of the man and his prospects.

Although his football experience has been limited largely to Sweden, what he has done for football and with the Swedish national team shines even through the field of more renowned coaches that populate the European football space. He could not be disregarded.

The report of the interview panel in Nigeria speaks volumes about the man. He was interviewed last, one day after others! He dazzled everyone of the panelists. He was described by some of the most critical minds in Nigerian football (Mastoroudes, Aminu, Onigbinde) in lavish terms for the content of his views, his vision and passion for the Super Eagles, the depth of his knowledge of Nigerian football and football players, and how far he would take the Nigerian team in five months, given a chance.

What topped it up, the icing on the cake, what finally blew the minds of all the panellists, including the most unrepentant advocate of indigenous coaches, Chief Adegboye Onigbinde, was the presentation and graphical illustration of how he would grow the domestic game in Nigeria after the World Cup.

I listened to the reports and my mouth was agape. All of this after I had been told of what happened in London, where although Bruno Metsu was impressive, Glenn Hoddle's entry had all but ensured that the job was going to the Englishman.

I was also so excited about Glen's entry into the race for the job that my piece last week on this page was dedicated to him. I was convinced no one could beat him. Glen's entry, apart from his impeccable credentials as a footballer and a manager, would also have been a political and economic 'coup' for Nigeria and the Super Eagles.

An Englishman of Glens football pedigree and status would have been an excellent compliment to a Nigerian team that needed to lift its game and become a useful tool in the re-branding effort of the country riding on the back of the unprecedented global media interest that would have been generated through the most powerful media in the world - the English press!

A relationship with Glen would have created opportunities and possibilities in a relationship between Nigerian and English football beyond what can be immediately imagined!

To have put all of that aside and offered the job to Lars Lagerback, meant, therefore, that the man must have been truly impressive at the Abuja interview!

Thats why I was anxious to meet the man myself and hear him. Fortunately I did.

Last Wednesday morning, John Fashanu, Larry Izamoje, Abba Yola and I had the privilege of meeting him from close up. We had invited him on behalf of the Presidential Task Force for a chit chat.

He was accompanied by Chairman of the NFF technical committee, Taiwo Ogunjobi, Vice chairman, Dominic Iorfa, and Lar's English lawyer and legal adviser.

It was really a brief social interaction that revealed a little of the man behind the football mask. On his face I saw a little bit of apprehension and plenty of excitement. It was a contradiction, but thatŐs what I saw.

Nigeria's reputation in dealing with all former foreign coaches was known to him. That must have been the source of his mild apprehension. At the same time he had spent a week in Nigeria and had witnessed naked and unadulterated hospitality, uncommon friendship and assurances from everyone he met!

I could see he wanted to get on with the job, and that he would rather get on to the football field than go on the circus of endless meetings, conferences and negotiations. He was obviously not a gregarious man in the manner of a Clemens Westerhof, or dour and uninteresting like Jo Bonfrere. He was a cut in between, confident, respectable and conservative.

Without question, Lars would usher in a completely new dimension to Nigerian football. It would be a new experiment and experience. Nigeria's football into the next five months would surely not be the extravagant individual flair of Eastern Europe, or the flamboyant expressiveness of Brazil, or the total football concept of Dutch football, or even the fast-paced end-to-end football of English football, all of which have been influences on Nigerian football the way it is today.

From what I thought of the Lars Lagerback I met, he believes he will bring some conservativeness, dignity, discipline, organisation, and a scientific touch to the game.

Only time will tell though if we have made the right choice, a complete deviation from the past into a new realm and experience!

How would Nigeria fare at the World Cup? Mark my words, the world is in for some pleasant surprises. The coming of Lagerback will propel the Super Eagles to new and exciting heights.

Nothing Has Changed In Nigerian Football!

I was at the national stadium in Abuja to watch the Super Eagles take on the Congo DPR. The scoreline was flattering as it did not reflect what went on during the match. Sitting and watching the game got me thinking. With the developments of the past few years in Nigerian football, with the wholesome retardation that we have witnessed at every level of the game in the country, one would have expected that major changes would be taking place at this time following the open demonstration of discontentment by the people these past months with the state of affairs in the game.

But what do I observe? The only change that has taken place has been the demotion of Amodu Shuaibu from Super Eagles to home Eagles! Everything else remains exactly the same. That interprets to me to mean that the problem with Nigerian football these past few years has been the person of Amodu Shuaibu! No way! The coming of Lars Lagerback should not becloud the issues. Amodu should not be portrayed (as is being done now) as the black sheep of Nigerian football. He, as well as the vast majority of Nigerians, is a victim of shenanigans.

He has been made the sacrificial lamb of the intrigues, manipulations and politics of a cabal that will not let go of the jugular of Nigerian football! The truth is that the time for major changes has come and so far little has changed!

segunodegbami@hotmail.com


..

Bunch17
Mar 7, 2010, 05:14 PM
What topped it up, the icing on the cake, what finally blew the minds of all the panellists, including the most unrepentant advocate of indigenous coaches, Chief Adegboye Onigbinde, was the presentation and graphical illustration of how he would grow the domestic game in Nigeria after the World Cup.

Nuff said!

No Smoking
Mar 7, 2010, 05:34 PM
@Kenn & MJ

'E don do, for di bot' of una. Oya, begin kiss and make-up... :D

Abeg, fresh oxygen only... :hail:

Make I go back go read wetin "mat'imatikal" Segun write above.

No Smoking
Mar 7, 2010, 05:59 PM
Segun Odegbami wrote
Only time will tell though if we have made the right choice, a complete deviation from the past into a new realm and experience!

How would Nigeria fare at the World Cup? Mark my words, the world is in for some pleasant surprises. The coming of Lagerback will propel the Super Eagles to new and exciting heights.

Nothing Has Changed In Nigerian Football!
........................
.....................

He {Amodu) has been made the sacrificial lamb of the intrigues, manipulations and politics of a cabal that will not let go of the jugular of Nigerian football! The truth is that the time for major changes has come and so far little has changed!

Abeg, make somebodi wey sabi Segun tell am seh make 'e com village come add flesh to dis "intrigues" and "cabal" t'ing.

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 06:00 PM
@Kenn & MJ

'E don do, for di bot' of una. Oya, begin kiss and make-up... :D

Abeg, fresh oxygen only... :hail:



No Smoking,

No mind am! He think say na him be my running mate! Anyway, no cause for alarm. I have told the young man to kneel down, hands up and close his eyes. After 15 minutes, I will release him, kiss him and rub him make-up as you've suggested.:p I may even rename him as "Sisi Jaga" if he continues to be a good girl!:wink:

Thank you for your wisdom.:D


...

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 06:03 PM
Segun Odegbami wrote

Abeg, make somebodi wey sabi Segun tell am seh make 'e com village come add flesh to dis "intrigues" and "cabal" t'ing.

You can contact him and challenge him to come and substantiate his claims. He is a public person and the article is a piece published for public consumption. His email is in the piece he wrote, which I posted. So, write him and ask him to come expatiate on the issue you've highlighted.

...

Austin
Mar 7, 2010, 07:13 PM
Lars Lagerback - A new dimension to Nigerian football!

By Segun Odegbami

The report of the interview panel in Nigeria speaks volumes about the man. He was interviewed last, one day after others! He dazzled everyone of the panelists. He was described by some of the most critical minds in Nigerian football (Mastoroudes, Aminu, Onigbinde) in lavish terms for the content of his views, his vision and passion for the Super Eagles, the depth of his knowledge of Nigerian football and football players, and how far he would take the Nigerian team in five months, given a chance.

What topped it up, the icing on the cake, what finally blew the minds of all the panellists, including the most unrepentant advocate of indigenous coaches, Chief Adegboye Onigbinde, was the presentation and graphical illustration of how he would grow the domestic game in Nigeria after the World Cup.

And on reading the above, it becomes obvious why the black man is considered stupid. In fact, the Nigerian version of the black man is indeed VERY VERY STUPID


Thats why I was anxious to meet the man myself and hear him. Fortunately I did....

It was really a brief social interaction that revealed a little of the man behind the football mask. On his face I saw a little bit of apprehension and plenty of excitement. It was a contradiction, but thatŐs what I saw.

Its nice of you sir to notice, but may I haste to tell you sire, that you ain't seen nothing yet. If the guy could not perfectly disguise his apprehension in public, how I wish you have met him in private. You may perhaps bug his room to get what am trying to say...


Nigeria's reputation in dealing with all former foreign coaches was known to him. That must have been the source of his mild apprehension.
Maybe sir, but I doubt it. Me think the guy is apprehensive because he's thinking, "wao I screwed this guy and now see how they are fawning on me"


At the same time he had spent a week in Nigeria and had witnessed naked and unadulterated hospitality, uncommon friendship and assurances from everyone he met!
In all seriousness, Mr Odegbami, we scandinavians don't like people fawning on us. We don't like excessive praises singing or is it called, psychopancy. Give us a job to do and we will try our best on it, chikena. criticize us and we'll be happy to defend ourselves. But call us "the special one" what the hell is that! From when we were babies we were raised to keep our expectations low, not to think too much of ourselves; that way, nobody gets disappointed when we cant deliver. The guy is probably apprehensive because although he is trying hard to be nice, still his head won't just shut up from screaming: these "negers" are damned fools or what?


I could see he wanted to get on with the job, and that he would rather get on to the football field than go on the circus of endless meetings, conferences and negotiations. He was obviously not a gregarious man in the manner of a Clemens Westerhof, or dour and uninteresting like Jo Bonfrere. He was a cut in between, confident, respectable and conservative.

Ok now, here you seem to get what I was trying to say up there


Without question, Lars would usher in a completely new dimension to Nigerian football. It would be a new experiment and experience. Nigeria's football into the next five months would surely not be the extravagant individual flair of Eastern Europe, or the flamboyant expressiveness of Brazil, or the total football concept of Dutch football, or even the fast-paced end-to-end football of English football, all of which have been influences on Nigerian football the way it is today.

All these in the next 4˝ months?


Only time will tell though if we have made the right choice, a complete deviation from the past into a new realm and experience!

Chief, I don't mean to put black people down, but this type of thinking is what exposes and suggest we are retards. Why? Because it is a meaningless statement. For the outcome is already predetermined. As it can only go one way or the other. To wit, either things get better or worse. Either we perform well at the world cup or we don't. Anybody, with even a very limited knowledge of football coaching can take the Eagles to the world cup and stake his reputation on time (will tell) That, is no brainer! What is important is the process that led to the hiring and everything that surrounds it. Have we applied the best part of our brain to the process that built up to this? have we acted sensibly, fairly etc


Nothing Has Changed In Nigerian Football!

But what do I observe? The only change that has taken place has been the demotion of Amodu Shuaibu from Super Eagles to home Eagles! Everything else remains exactly the same. That interprets to me to mean that the problem with Nigerian football these past few years has been the person of Amodu Shuaibu! No way! The coming of Lars Lagerback should not becloud the issues. Amodu should not be portrayed (as is being done now) as the black sheep of Nigerian football. He, as well as the vast majority of Nigerians, is a victim of shenanigans.

He has been made the sacrificial lamb of the intrigues, manipulations and politics of a cabal that will not let go of the jugular of Nigerian football! The truth is that the time for major changes has come and so far little has changed!

Chief, if I say that I understand you, then I mean it, even though that paragraph was badly written. But still I get you. You seem to be saying, Amodu is not the problem, the system is the real problem. So why did we need to sack Amodu? Why did you not speak up against his sack? Why are you here praising Lagerbach? In fact, what exactly are you doing?

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 08:12 PM
.


Austin,

I'm not sure Mr Odegbami would be aware of your criticism if you leave it here. It's obvious one of the reasons he leaves his email address in his Saturday Guardian column is to receive feedbacks like yours. Why don't you package your criticism and send it to him via that email. I can also give you his telephone numbers if you need it to speak to him. That way he will know what you are talking about and respond if he chooses. That is the fair thing. Right now he has no chance to know what you're talking about and therefore no chance to respond.

Personally, I find your cynicism worrying. To sit there and read Lagerback's mind and even declare him a deceitful racist, just from the account of someone who actually met him and who never said or inferred any of that is mind-boggling. Anyway, as I implied, I would rather you send your response to Mr Odegbami. I think he is very capable of defending himself.




CHEERS!


No Smoking
Mar 7, 2010, 08:17 PM
You can contact him and challenge him to come and substantiate his claims. He is a public person and the article is a piece published for public consumption. His email is in the piece he wrote, which I posted. So, write him and ask him to come expatiate on the issue you've highlighted....

Hehe, Kenn. Wetin I seh na for pesin weh sabi da Chief to summon am com village. Nor be make 'e siddon dey write for Guardian. Make 'im com awa middle com talk....Yawa... :)

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 08:25 PM
.


No Smoking,


Hehe, Kenn. Wetin I seh na for pesin weh sabi da Chief to summon am com village. Nor be make 'e siddon dey write for Guardian. Make 'im com awa middle com talk....Yawa... :)

Yes, I understand you. But you need to also understand that the Nigerian Village Square is only one place and a small place in the worldwide web or in the community of Nigerians discussing football. The Guardian is a national newspaper and Odegbami is a columnist, a former star player and a football administrator. He has given indication that he can be contacted by those who read him by giving his email address. Use it. If you want his phone numbers, I can get it for you. You don't have to know him or seek those who know him to get his attention.



CHEERS!

...

Austin
Mar 7, 2010, 09:53 PM
.


Austin,

I’m not sure Mr Odegbami would be aware of your criticism if you leave it here. It's obvious one of the reasons he leaves his email address in his Saturday Guardian column is to receive feedbacks like yours. Why don’t you package your criticism and send it to him via that email. I can also give you his telephone numbers if you need it to speak to him. That way he will know what you are talking about and respond if he chooses. That is the fair thing. Right now he has no chance to know what you’re talking about and therefore no chance to respond.

Personally, I find your cynicism worrying. To sit there and read Lagerback’s mind and even declare him a deceitful racist, just from the account of someone who actually met him and who never said or inferred any of that is mind-boggling. Anyway, as I implied, I would rather you send your response to Mr Odegbami. I think he is very capable of defending himself.


CHEERS!



Thanks. I saw the email address and considered (infact am still considering) sending my reply to him. But I posted it here because here is my home, where I live and therefore everything starts from here. And thanks for the offer of the phone number, but will you also provide me with the credit or can I flash chief Odegbami?:D:D

By the way, maybe lagerback has not yet been caught on tape, to which I will say lucky him. And he better keep it that way.

Here is a statement credited to his colleague just accross the bridge, the other day

Danish coach in racist tirade
Wednesday 12 Jun 2002
Denmark coach Morten Olsen has launched a racist tirade about African footballers saying �we should have never taught them to play football�.

After steering his side into the second round of the World Cup at the expense of France, Olsen said: �I have played together with Africans myself and know they are the worst."

Olsen, reacting to what he thought were over-the-top tackles from Senegal's players against Denmark last week added:
"What we saw recently is that it is apparent it hasn't been removed from them, even though they have come, or grown up in Europe. They have got it in their genes apparently.

"We should never have taught them to play football."
Here is the source (http://www.kickitout.org/news.php/news_id/2238)

By the way, some of us are aware that the word "neger" is the generally used and generally accepted word for black people in the Scandinavia. Here Mr Lagerback must be very careful - no slip of tongue - as same word is offensive to we the black people.

NoLongThing
Mar 7, 2010, 10:02 PM
Africa's world cup is already up in shambles as not only do we have to do without our so-called best team but two of Africa's best (Nigeria and Ivory Coast) are doling out lessons on how not to plan carefully for a world cup. How on earth some of you guys can approve of the NFF picking the coach of a failed Swedish Team and with absolutely no experience of African football, then offer same $1.5m to take over one of Africa's major Footballing powers three months to the world cup and then expect him to perform miracles. LWKD!:D:D:D

Austin
Mar 7, 2010, 10:17 PM
Still on the Danish coach's quote:

On many occassions, I do censor myself and I do fight myself for seing things from certain perspective. But Yoruba people say, mo mo iwa ara ile mi, kii se eebu - that is, "to say that I know my neighbours character, cannot be interpreted as an insult"

And now Kenn, please tell me, if you are privy to a statement like the one above, would you still go ahead and hire one of them,
- at an exhorbitant fee? and
- at the expense of one of your own, who btw only only needs some serious encouragement?

In the end, me think that this thing called tribal, national, racial etc. pride is such a complicated thing. If you don't nurse it some people will rub it on you, and if you nurture it, some will equally castigate you for it. But the question me always ask is, why have a tribe, nation, race etc, if you cannot cherish it?

No Smoking
Mar 7, 2010, 10:32 PM
@Kenn
See wetin Austin been write. 'E jus' be laik seh 'e take da word from my mot'. Anybodi weh dey too busy abi too big to com awa village, me sef no get time for am. Dat's wai, e.g.. I no dey waste time follow "Robot".... :D


Thanks. I saw the email address and considered (infact am still considering) sending my reply to him. But I posted it here because here is my home, where I live and therefore everything starts from here. And thanks for the offer of the phone number, but will you also provide me with the credit or can I flash chief Odegbami :D :D

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 10:52 PM
Still on the Danish coach's quote:

On many occassions, I do censor myself and I do fight myself for seing things from certain perspective. But Yoruba people say, mo mo iwa ara ile mi, kii se eebu - that is, "to say that I know my neighbours character, cannot be interpreted as an insult"

And now Kenn, please tell me, if you are privy to a statement like the one above, would you still go ahead and hire one of them,
- at an exhorbitant fee? and
- at the expense of one of your own, who btw only only needs some serious encouragement?

In the end, me think that this thing called tribal, national, racial etc. pride is such a complicated thing. If you don't nurse it some people will rub it on you, and if you nurture it, some will equally castigate you for it. But the question me always ask is, why have a tribe, nation, race etc, if you cannot cherish it?

Austin,

I'm surprised you still cannot recognise the terrible mistake you are making. You are showing such open prejudice that cannot be defended anywhere. I mean, I read that Olsen story in an anti-racism website at the time and thought it was stupid. I was never a fan of Olsen before then and I am not a fan now. Yet, I see that you want to put his sin on Lagerback, whose only crime is that he is Scandinavian (not even Danish), like Olsen! Now, didn't you describe yourself here as Scandinavian? Are you not Danish? Should we now conclude that you are as racist as Olsen since you are Scandinavian? Or, perhaps, since you are Nigerian, you should be lynched for the crime of another Nigerian? I find your whole argument untenable. The fact that people will reduce a mere change of national coach to a racial war is depressing.


Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 10:56 PM
.


No Smoking,


@Kenn
See wetin Austin been write. 'E jus' be laik seh 'e take da word from my mot'. Anybodi weh dey too busy abi too big to com awa village, me sef no get time for am. Dat's wai, e.g.. I no dey waste time follow "Robot".... :D

Have you invited him to the village and he didn't come? What makes you think he knows about your village or what you want him to come and do here? Does the world revolve around your village? If you want to speak to a man, you first get his attention. It is unfair to speak of him being "too big to com awa village" when you have not invited him and when he is unaware of your grouse. That amounts to false accusation! And I dare say that's very unreasonable!


...

Kenn
Mar 7, 2010, 11:29 PM
Africa’s world cup is already up in shambles as not only do we have to do without our so-called best team but two of Africa’s best (Nigeria and Ivory Coast) are doling out lessons on how not to plan carefully for a world cup. How on earth some of you guys can approve of the NFF picking the coach of a failed Swedish Team and with absolutely no experience of African football, then offer same $1.5m to take over one of Africa’s major Footballing powers three months to the world cup and then expect him to perform miracles. LWKD!:D:D:D

Yes, everyone accepts that the timing was a little late, but most people accept that irrespective of this fact, it just had to be done before the World Cup. Or what did you expect Amodu was going to go and do at the World Cup with the evidence of what he showed at the African Nations Cup? Yes, challenges like these are troubling; but sometimes it does help to foster team spirit and strengthen resolve. Vicente Feola had only two months to prepare Brazil for the World Cup in 1958. This was a team that has been dispirited by the loss of big names, government interference and cynical citizenry. He still got them together and returned with the World Cup! Yeah, I know you will say we’re talking Brazil. But note that they were not the football world power they are now at the time. It was actually the first time they won it. Of course, I’m not saying we are going to go there and win it, but stranger things have happened in football.

As for Lagerback being the coach of a failed Swedish team, his record speaks for itself. The fact that he has no experience of African football is overstated. The world is global. Information is disseminated and digested in various ways. Technology has made it easier for anyone anywhere to know African football if they want to without being in Africa. He sat and talked African football with a panel of people who knew African football and they were impressed – impressed enough to hire him ahead of other supposedly stronger candidates. And please note that we are not going to play “African football” in South Africa, just football.



CHEERS!

PS: Lagerback is not earning $1.5 million. He is paid $1.3 million for himself, his assistant, the video/computer analyst and the physical trainer.

...

...

No Smoking
Mar 7, 2010, 11:53 PM
.
No Smoking,

Have you invited him to the village and he didn't come? What makes you think he knows about your village or what you want him to come and do here? ..If you want to speak to a man, you first get his attention..

Dat's wai we been dey look for go-between. I t'ink yu don tanda for bature-land sotay yu don froget how dis wan dey work :lol:


Does the world revolve around your village?

Mba. Nor does it revolve around di Guardian :D

[/QUOTE]It is unfair to speak of him being "too big to com awa village" when you have not invited him and when he is unaware of your grouse. That amounts to false accusation! And I dare say that's very unreasonable!...[/QUOTE]

:no: Gba brake, Kenn. My comment been follow ya input about Chief being Guardian columnist, Star player, football administrator, ati bebelo. Se yu get. Yawa.

Kenn
Mar 8, 2010, 12:19 AM
Dat's wai we been dey look for go-between. I t'ink yu don tanda for bature-land sotay yu don froget how dis wan dey work :lol:



Mba. Nor does it revolve around di Guardian :D

It is unfair to speak of him being “too big to com awa village” when you have not invited him and when he is unaware of your grouse. That amounts to false accusation! And I dare say that’s very unreasonable!...


:no: Gba brake, Kenn. My comment been follow ya input about Chief being Guardian columnist, Star player, football administrator, ati bebelo. Se yu get. Yawa.[/QUOTE

Yes, his comment I posted is from his Saturday column in the Guardian. He is doing that as a public commentator; so, you don't need a go-between from bature-land to contact him. He never said the world revolves around the Guardian; but you are making out that the world revolves around NVS! If you had spent all this while we have spent on this exchange sending him a short email, he probably would have responded to you by now. Try.:lol:

..

Mikky jaga
Mar 8, 2010, 09:21 AM
Odegbami, like many of those politrickcians is angling for a place on the board of NFF. So he has to speak from both sides of his mouth. One minute he is exultant that Nigeria landed Lagerback, the next minute he is saying only time will tell if he is the right choice. He then did not forget to remind that Amodu was not the problem after the guy had been dealt the wrong card in order to get at the present Board as the cabal holding the Nation's progress in football back.

That is the rational explanation of the piece of contradictions he wrote in that article.

NoLongThing
Mar 8, 2010, 10:06 AM
Yes, everyone accepts that the timing was a little late, but most people accept that irrespective of this fact, it just had to be done before the World Cup. Or what did you expect Amodu was going to go and do at the World Cup with the evidence of what he showed at the African Nations Cup? Yes, challenges like these are troubling; but sometimes it does help to foster team spirit and strengthen resolve. Vicente Feola had only two months to prepare Brazil for the World Cup in 1958. This was a team that has been dispirited by the loss of big names, government interference and cynical citizenry. He still got them together and returned with the World Cup! Yeah, I know you will say we're talking Brazil. But note that they were not the football world power they are now at the time. It was actually the first time they won it. Of course, I'm not saying we are going to go there and win it, but stranger things have happened in football.

As for Lagerback being the coach of a failed Swedish team, his record speaks for itself. The fact that he has no experience of African football is overstated. The world is global. Information is disseminated and digested in various ways. Technology has made it easier for anyone anywhere to know African football if they want to without being in Africa. He sat and talked African football with a panel of people who knew African football and they were impressed – impressed enough to hire him ahead of other supposedly stronger candidates. And please note that we are not going to play "African football" in South Africa, just football.



CHEERS!

PS: Lagerback is not earning $1.5 million. He is paid $1.3 million for himself, his assistant, the video/computer analyst and the physical trainer.

...

...

Okay o, Kenn everyone get them own mind but my own mind no go gree me exist for "cloud cuckoo land" o, moreso when we have recent histories of the events leading to both 1998 (Bora) and 2002 (Onigbinde) as a lesson. And to think you would use the performance of a Brazilian coach (who by the way knew his own players) as far back as 1958 when qualification matches were not as rigorous or the world cup format not as elaborate as now seems like one grasping at straws to me.



This is just symptomatically typical of Chelsea supporters to me who now see themselves as a big team cos of new money.

Austin
Mar 8, 2010, 10:09 AM
Odegbami, like many of those politrickcians is angling for a place on the board of NFF. So he has to speak from both sides of his mouth. One minute he is exultant that Nigeria landed Lagerback, the next minute he is saying only time will tell if he is the right choice. He then did not forget to remind that Amodu was not the problem after the guy had been dealt the wrong card in order to get at the present Board as the cabal holding the Nation's progress in football back.

That is the rational explanation of the piece of contradictions he wrote in that article.

and that Mikky is what I am trying to say up there, plus I included some personal knowledge of the Scandinavia into the explanation of the issue from my personal angle.

Austin
Mar 8, 2010, 11:11 AM
Austin,
I'm surprised you still cannot recognise the terrible mistake you are making. You are showing such open prejudice that cannot be defended anywhere. I mean, I read that Olsen story in an anti-racism website at the time and thought it was stupid. I was never a fan of Olsen before then and I am not a fan now. Yet, I see that you want to put his sin on Lagerback, whose only crime is that he is Scandinavian (not even Danish), like Olsen! Now, didn't you describe yourself here as Scandinavian? Are you not Danish? Should we now conclude that you are as racist as Olsen since you are Scandinavian? Or, perhaps, since you are Nigerian, you should be lynched for the crime of another Nigerian? I find your whole argument untenable. The fact that people will reduce a mere change of national coach to a racial war is depressing.


Kenn, it is you not I who is making a mistake. But I don't see us agreing, hence why I have so far avoided getting into the argument with you.

Now here is the problem as I see it, you are and have been cleverly trying to present the issue as being about "a mere change of national coach".
I on the other hand, see it as more than just "a mere change of national coach."
And I equally see a measure of deceitfulness in those trying to present it as just "a mere change of national coach," because the issue had been ranging for a while now.

The other things you wrote still further expose the gulf between our thinking.
No, I am not yet danish, though I have a paper on my table that if I sign it now, I will automatically become one. But that not withstanding, I described myself as Scandinavian because I have lived and integrated here long enough to be able to make some specific generalisatios about the society. Like the d in the danish above, someone like you might think it's a mistake, but no that's just how we write it here... Now there is a reason for that, but explaining it will lead us farther away. all am just trying to say is that knowing other people's world view isn't such a bad thing.

Whether you can then conclude that you are as racist as Olsen? Well, sorry to disappoint you, but YES and that will be for your own good. The onus will then be on me to proof am not. See Kenn, the problem here is that I know what the "racism" in this context means and you perhaps don't. And I know when to switch in and out of it while you are perhaps clueless. And that is what gives me an edge over you. And that is what I am saying. not accusing him, not insulting him, just saying we ought to act a little more wisely.

"Or, perhaps, since you are Nigerian, you should be lynched for the crime of another Nigerian?"

Again, here am not saying to hang me, but am saying it is perfectly okay for you to be careful/weary of me. For as a Nigerian, I am privy to many crimes that most other people in the world would never even think of. I am not saying I participated, but I know (or know people that know) people who do. So why shouldn't you be weary of me or any other Nigerian for that matter?

But coming back to Lagerback and his new job, me still think that it displays a deep flaw in the thinking of the "negers" in-charge of sport in Nigeria and indeed in-charge of the whole country called Nigeria. We can debate how racistic or factual that statement is, but I have the right to make such comment on the phone to my brother in denmark without raising any storm.

By the way, Daddy Olsen has explained that he is not a racist o! His parents didn't bring him up like that, it was just an emotional outburst. As a matter of fact, he loves and supports the various causes trying to help the miserable negers. He is called FAR or Daddy, because he had been the national coach for such a long time and had trained many generations some of which are now much younger than his own children. Can we say the same for about any Nigerian coach?

In conclusion, let me repeat myself for the upteenth time, that I do not see this as a "mere change of a national coach" and I consider it naive for anyone to see it as such - my personal opinion. Bye and out!

Kenn
Mar 8, 2010, 05:32 PM
Odegbami, like many of those politrickcians is angling for a place on the board of NFF. So he has to speak from both sides of his mouth. One minute he is exultant that Nigeria landed Lagerback, the next minute he is saying only time will tell if he is the right choice. He then did not forget to remind that Amodu was not the problem after the guy had been dealt the wrong card in order to get at the present Board as the cabal holding the Nation's progress in football back.

That is the rational explanation of the piece of contradictions he wrote in that article.

Obviously, you think it's a zero sum game. If you don't like the cabalistic nature of football administration and say so, you must not express hope in a new coach and you must not exonerate a former one if you think he isn't the problem some are making out. It doesn't matter that you are a member of the Presidential Task Force, an ex-international and a noted football administrator. Yeah, for daring to suggest that time will tell if Lagerback is a good choice (which any thinking person would have thought logical, considering the man is yet to even take his first training session), your head should be installed on a spike and taken round town. Pitiful.:redface:


...

Kenn
Mar 8, 2010, 05:41 PM
.


Balo,


Okay o, Kenn everyone get them own mind but my own mind no go gree me exist for "cloud cuckoo land" o, moreso when we have recent histories of the events leading to both 1998 (Bora) and 2002 (Onigbinde) as a lesson. And to think you would use the performance of a Brazilian coach (who by the way knew his own players) as far back as 1958 when qualification matches were not as rigorous or the world cup format not as elaborate as now seems like one grasping at straws to me.


As you said, "everyone get them own mind". It is therefore entirely your right to think you are not in "cloud cuckoo land", even if your history is a little self-serving. Personally, I believe there is nothing in 1998 and 2002 that makes it wise to stick with Amodu for the World Cup. I am comfortable with someone else there now, period.




This is just symptomatically typical of Chelsea supporters to me who now see themselves as a big team cos of new money.

You dey jealous?:p


...

NoLongThing
Mar 8, 2010, 05:44 PM
Jealous ke, water go soon find im level!:p Anyway I hand it to you, you don talk say that example of 1958 dey self serving.:shake:

Kenn
Mar 8, 2010, 05:50 PM
Kenn, it is you not I who is making a mistake. But I don't see us agreing, hence why I have so far avoided getting into the argument with you.

Now here is the problem as I see it, you are and have been cleverly trying to present the issue as being about "a mere change of national coach".
I on the other hand, see it as more than just "a mere change of national coach."
And I equally see a measure of deceitfulness in those trying to present it as just "a mere change of national coach," because the issue had been ranging for a while now.

The other things you wrote still further expose the gulf between our thinking.
No, I am not yet danish, though I have a paper on my table that if I sign it now, I will automatically become one. But that not withstanding, I described myself as Scandinavian because I have lived and integrated here long enough to be able to make some specific generalisatios about the society. Like the d in the danish above, someone like you might think it's a mistake, but no that's just how we write it here... Now there is a reason for that, but explaining it will lead us farther away. all am just trying to say is that knowing other people's world view isn't such a bad thing.

Whether you can then conclude that you are as racist as Olsen? Well, sorry to disappoint you, but YES and that will be for your own good. The onus will then be on me to proof am not. See Kenn, the problem here is that I know what the "racism" in this context means and you perhaps don't. And I know when to switch in and out of it while you are perhaps clueless. And that is what gives me an edge over you. And that is what I am saying. not accusing him, not insulting him, just saying we ought to act a little more wisely.

"Or, perhaps, since you are Nigerian, you should be lynched for the crime of another Nigerian?"

Again, here am not saying to hang me, but am saying it is perfectly okay for you to be careful/weary of me. For as a Nigerian, I am privy to many crimes that most other people in the world would never even think of. I am not saying I participated, but I know (or know people that know) people who do. So why shouldn't you be weary of me or any other Nigerian for that matter?

But coming back to Lagerback and his new job, me still think that it displays a deep flaw in the thinking of the "negers" in-charge of sport in Nigeria and indeed in-charge of the whole country called Nigeria. We can debate how racistic or factual that statement is, but I have the right to make such comment on the phone to my brother in denmark without raising any storm.

By the way, Daddy Olsen has explained that he is not a racist o! His parents didn't bring him up like that, it was just an emotional outburst. As a matter of fact, he loves and supports the various causes trying to help the miserable negers. He is called FAR or Daddy, because he had been the national coach for such a long time and had trained many generations some of which are now much younger than his own children. Can we say the same for about any Nigerian coach?

In conclusion, let me repeat myself for the upteenth time, that I do not see this as a "mere change of a national coach" and I consider it naive for anyone to see it as such - my personal opinion. Bye and out!


Austin,

It's your prerogative to read into the change whatever you want; but what you cannot do is prejudge people and ascribe to them what they are not or, at least, what they are not known to be. As far as I'm concerned, my last response to you clearly identifies what the problem is with your view. I don't think you've showed anything to make me believe you aren't making a mistake. Indeed, you've further confirmed it. Thanks

...

omaks
Mar 8, 2010, 07:27 PM
Niger Bois fit argue nor be small. Some didn't want Amodu replaced while others did. We all debated the point exhaustively. In the end, 'Nigerian Football Fools' did what they wanted. We then started arguing again who should be employed as the next Foreign Technical Coach. Just as their names were being mentioned, so too did they all fall by the way side like a pack of cards, until Lagerback suddenly carried the day. The argument is still on going, but hardly has any argument revoleved round how nigeria can redress the problems of ineptitude engulfing the 'Glass House'.

I'm certain of one thing though, Come a couple of months or thereabout, all attention whould be focused on the World Cup in South Africa, and thus we will have a temporary reprieve from all this chitty chatty 'bout Nigeraian Football and its fumbling Eagles. Then again, maybe we would be talking about them all through to the Finals.

In football, expect the unexpected, especially where the Super Eagles is concerned.

Mikky jaga
Mar 9, 2010, 05:53 AM
Niger Bois fit argue nor be small. Some didn't want Amodu replaced while others did. We all debated the point exhaustively. In the end, 'Nigerian Football Fools' did what they wanted. We then started arguing again who should be employed as the next Foreign Technical Coach. Just as their names were being mentioned, so too did they all fall by the way side like a pack of cards, until Lagerback suddenly carried the day. The argument is still on going, but hardly has any argument revoleved round how nigeria can redress the problems of ineptitude engulfing the 'Glass House'.

I'm certain of one thing though, Come a couple of months or thereabout, all attention whould be focused on the World Cup in South Africa, and thus we will have a temporary reprieve from all this chitty chatty 'bout Nigeraian Football and its fumbling Eagles. Then again, maybe we would be talking about them all through to the Finals.

In football, expect the unexpected, especially where the Super Eagles is concerned.

You can be sure that in any thread that Kenn features, there must be plenty arguments. He tends to think every thread is The Crucible. He must win the argument, whether what he is saying makes sense or not.

Austin
Mar 9, 2010, 07:30 PM
Niger Bois fit argue nor be small. Some didn't want Amodu replaced while others did. We all debated the point exhaustively. In the end, 'Nigerian Football Fools' did what they wanted. We then started arguing again who should be employed as the next Foreign Technical Coach. Just as their names were being mentioned, so too did they all fall by the way side like a pack of cards, until Lagerback suddenly carried the day. The argument is still on going, but hardly has any argument revoleved round how nigeria can redress the problems of ineptitude engulfing the 'Glass House'.

I'm certain of one thing though, Come a couple of months or thereabout, all attention whould be focused on the World Cup in South Africa, and thus we will have a temporary reprieve from all this chitty chatty 'bout Nigeraian Football and its fumbling Eagles. Then again, maybe we would be talking about them all through to the Finals.

In football, expect the unexpected, especially where the Super Eagles is concerned.

Thanks Omaks,
But your point is what someone like moi is trying to make, albeit bogged down in the intricies of debating/arguments such as this. It exactly what I meant by the issue not being about a mere change of coach. Indeed it is what brought about the issue of racism and so on.
Question is why is it hard for some of us black people to be able to see farther than our noses? Why can't we have comprehesive plans for all things? Why can't we see issues from many broad angles instead of the typically one self serving myopic angle?
Now we've spent abouut $1.5m to hire a coach, and all somebody can tell us here is that we also got a lawyer and a cameraman in the bargain mwshiorrrr!

Kenn
Mar 9, 2010, 10:07 PM
.


Austin,


Question is why is it hard for some of us black people to be able to see farther than our noses? Why can't we have comprehesive plans for all things? Why can't we see issues from many broad angles instead of the typically one self serving myopic angle?


With the kind of view you're touting here, I'm sure you know it's so easy to also accuse you of what you are accusing others of. Anyone who would think there is a racial angle to the appointment of the coach of a national team in a World Cup season in 2010 can be rightly accused of myopia or not seeing further than their noses.



Now we've spent abouut $1.5m to hire a coach, and all somebody can tell us here is that we also got a lawyer and a cameraman in the bargain mwshiorrrr!

Again, before you lose the facts in a comic puff, it's $1.3m for Lagerback, Roland Andersson his Swedish Assistant, the video/computer analyst and the physical trainer. I hope that is now clear





...

Kenn
Mar 9, 2010, 10:13 PM
.


Mikky Jaga,


You can be sure that in any thread that Kenn features, there must be plenty arguments. He tends to think every thread is The Crucible. He must win the argument, whether what he is saying makes sense or not.

Grow up, bros. This type of statement is only made by children or people not sure of themselves. Did I stop you from making your arguments or points? Is there a contest going on? Has anyone declared me a winner? Why are you feeling I'm in need of winning the argument? To what end? I mean, is it now a crime to express one's view? Is it a crime to have healthy debates over issues concerning our country or our world, be it sports, politics or whatever takes our fancy? Or am I the one having the debate/arguments here with myself? Are you not involved along with several others?

Listen, my dear, let me explain how this place works, because it is obvious that despite having been around here for long, you still do not have an idea. Anybody can say anything they want on these boards as part of a debate, as far as they do not breach the rules and anyone can accept any view expressed or ideas proposed here or choose not to accept any. That is why it is called a marketplace of ideas. There are good and not-so-good ideas punched out by all manner of persons behind keyboards; but as in any market, you can pick what you want and leave what you don't want, even after haggling over price or whatever or simply just window-shop and move on. The most pathetic thing to say therefore is that your opponent is trying to sell his wares (ideas) in a market place of ideas. Try and sell yours. Don't feel intimidated! And most importantly, remember that it is not grammar we are selling here (though it helps), but ideas.



CHEERS!

..

Austin
Mar 9, 2010, 11:00 PM
.

Austin,

With the kind of view you’re touting here, I’m sure you know it’s so easy to also accuse you of what you are accusing others of. Anyone who would think there is a racial angle to the appointment of the coach of a national team in a World Cup season in 2010 can be rightly accused of myopia or not seeing further than their noses.



Of course, but that is if that person wants to be mischievous, because what I am saying is not that there IS a ratial angle to it, but that there may be a racial angle to it. And the racial angle is one of the many other angles that ought to have been looked into. And those at the panel may just have asked him his opinion about it and even quote the Olsen statement to him, just to sound him out, instead of being mesmerised by his use of graphs and charts - something very basal for anyone conversant enough with project presentation. Anyway, not that I haven't noticed the attempt to pin me to the racial issue, just that I am actually enjoying it.:D


.Again, before you lose the facts in a comic puff, it’s $1.3m for Lagerback, Roland Andersson his Swedish Assistant, the video/computer analyst and the physical trainer. I hope that is now clear...


Oh, I blew it big time! So up there is the fact, thanks a lot. But then what exactly were we buying, me thought t'was just the coach that needed replacement. Anyway, me agree that the guy surely needs his buddies around him, otherwise Abuja can be quite a bore. I hope he negatiated something for his wife and kids too, who wouldn't like to escape this very hot weather Europe is recently experiencing. Somebody just please tell them not to go near Jos o!


Kenn, honestly speaking instead of all these argument, you and I, and I mean a combination of you the old man and me the youth, should be planning a sort of coup about how to topple these people and put in place better sports administration to the glory of our country. What are we doing here arguing? What are you doing supporting and defending those clueless bunch (no relatives of Bunch17 o!)

Kenn
Mar 9, 2010, 11:45 PM
.


Austin,


[COLOR="Red"]Of course, but that is if that person wants to be mischievous, because what I am saying is not that there IS a ratial angle to it, but that there may be a racial angle to it. And the racial angle is one of the many other angles that ought to have been looked into. And those at the panel may just have asked him his opinion about it and even quote the Olsen statement to him, just to sound him out...

Why should anybody in their right senses be quoting Olsen to him? Would you be happy if anyone in Denmark is quoting Idi Amin to you simply because you're applying for a job?



Anyway, not that I haven't noticed the attempt to pin me to the racial issue, just that I am actually enjoying it.:D

I'm not doing much. You are doing a good job already pining yourself to the racial issue. :lol:



Oh, I blew it big time! So up there is the fact, thanks a lot. But then what exactly were we buying, me thought t'was just the coach that needed replacement. Anyway, me agree that the guy surely needs his buddies around him, otherwise Abuja can be quite a bore. I hope he negatiated something for his wife and kids too, who wouldn't like to escape this very hot weather Europe is recently experiencing. Somebody just please tell them not to go near Jos o!

They've been so advised. In fact, they're going about town in armoured tanks. Well protected.



Kenn, honestly speaking instead of all these argument, you and I, and I mean a combination of you the old man and me the youth, should be planning a sort of coup about how to topple these people and put in place better sports administration to the glory of our country. What are we doing here arguing? What are you doing supporting and defending those clueless bunch

You must be mistaking me for someone else. I did not support or defend anybody. I supported the sacking of a clueless coach and welcomed the appointment of Lagerback from the shortlist they presented.


CHEERS!
...

Austin
Mar 10, 2010, 10:57 AM
.
Austin,
Why should anybody in their right senses be quoting Olsen to him? Would you be happy if anyone in Denmark is quoting Idi Amin to you simply because you're applying for a job?

Why shouldn't they, if they have any clue about the relationship between Sweden and Denmark? And I suspect you don't have that clue too, hence your remark up there.

Someone quoting Idi Amin to me, a Nigerian, will be displaying his concern about something, and I will be glad to give my opinion if necessary. On the other hand, the bloke mught just be dispalying pure ignorance about matters Africana, and I will be glad educating him as well. But I will probably be glad they did - anyway, am so used to people asking me all sort such things, so no "yawa" there

But you did say "because you're applying for a job?" Well, did Lagerback apply for the job, or was his CV sent by someone? Again, this is some of the tiny but significant spins that someone like me just can't easily overlook


.You must be mistaking me for someone else. I did not support or defend anybody. I supported the sacking of a clueless coach and welcomed the appointment of Lagerback from the shortlist they presented.

CHEERS!
...
I say, good riddance... and good luck
But this is not a fair way to treat ourselves. it is surely not a decent way to treat our hero, maybe 2nd rated, but still a hero.

By the way, yesterday, I was opportuned to read Odewingie's interview in New African magazine February 2010 edition. Lagerback had not yet been employed by then, but Osas' opinion about the whole Super Eagles and Football administration in Nigeria can be clearly understood.

Kenn
Mar 10, 2010, 11:43 AM
.


Austin,


Why shouldn't they, if they have any clue about the relationship between Sweden and Denmark? And I suspect you don't have that clue too, hence your remark up there.


What has any relationship between Sweden and Denmark got to do with a Swedish coach seeking a job in another country? And even if he was Danish, what has what Olsen said got to do with him, as far as he himself does not share the opinion? I mean, even if Lagerback was Olsen's twin brother, any reasonable person will treat him differently from the other. He can only be responsible for what he does or says, not what an old Danish coach said almost eight years ago. Every Scandinavian looking for a job outside do not need to answer to Olsen's folly! Please, be reasonable.



Someone quoting Idi Amin to me, a Nigerian, will be displaying his concern about something, and I will be glad to give my opinion if necessary. On the other hand, the bloke mught just be dispalying pure ignorance about matters Africana, and I will be glad educating him as well.

From all indications, you are not in a position to educate such an ignorant fellow. You will shake his hands and declare him the smartest dude on earth for having the perception to ask a Nigerian about Idi Amin, since both are Africans and one must carry the can for the other's conduct, just as you are proposing that the Swede, Lagerback carries the can for the Dane, Olsen.



But I will probably be glad they did - anyway, am so used to people asking me all sort such things, so no "yawa" there.

Exactly, you will be glad….



But you did say "because you're applying for a job?" Well, did Lagerback apply for the job, or was his CV sent by someone? Again, this is some of the tiny but significant spins that someone like me just can't easily overlook

You can read into that what you want. But no one would be presenting his CV if he wasn't applying for the job and no one would have shortlisted him, interviewed him and offered him the job if he didn't. Maybe you should have equally sent in a statement warning the panel about the relationship between Sweden and Denmark, after all, you are an expert in such maatters. Yeah, you should have sent them a note explaining to them why Lagerback is just another Olsen (even if it is only in your imagination, as it is now).



I say, good riddance... and good luck
But this is not a fair way to treat ourselves. it is surely not a decent way to treat our hero, maybe 2nd rated, but still a hero.

Yeah, he's the first coach to be sacked in history.:rolleyes: Look, Amodu is one of the luckiest Nigerians alive. He has survived within the national set up for so long, because he has godfathers there who keep him to continue their mediocre displays. If you like worship him, call him a hero or whatever. Right now, we have moved on and there is no amount of side carping the will change the course.



By the way, yesterday, I was opportuned to read Odewingie's interview in New African magazine February 2010 edition. Lagerback had not yet been employed by then, but Osas' opinion about the whole Super Eagles and Football administration in Nigeria can be clearly understood.

And what is it he said that is important to this debate? Why didn't you post the link? Anyway, everyone following football knows Odemwingie was one of our best players at the African Nations Cup. Now, even without knowing what you read in the New African magazine, it is instructive reading what he had to say about his coach after our loss to Ghana. Now, read and tell us if that look like a coach who has the confidence and respect of his players:


http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/sports/article03/indexn2_html?pdate=300110&ptitle=Odemwingie%20Blasts%20Amodu,%20As%20NFF%20P lans%20Changes%20in%20Super%20Eagles


...

Austin
Mar 11, 2010, 02:29 AM
Now its out, you hate the guy Amodu soo bad and thats it, all the rest is just bunkum, spin, after thought ati bee bee lo. So the guy is out now, you can all enjoy una after party. But no, the party cannot be fun, because of the evil that produced it. C'est la vie!

If the coach does not enjoy the respect of its team, what does that say about the system that produced them both? Sorry, I forgot there's a ready made solution - to everything obviously - "get a foreign coach" and all will be well. Yeye.:rolleyes:

You may call him "lucky", but a lucky-hero he still is - time and chance happens to everyone. And if I like I can erect a big fat statue of him and start worshipping it. But that will still not change the fact that those who sacked him did a very great injustice to a Nigerian hero - Chikena.

And the question about Idi Amin; Meen, was I right you'd love the answer!:hail: Of course, your analogy was a bad one, and its even getting 'badder' by the minute. But since I don't seem to be clear enough to you, let me try again. My concern is not primarily about the nature of the question, but about the right to ask it - especially when there is the chance to and the context is relevant. Its like asking a professed Communist his opinion about a statement by Chairman Mao. Or a Scandinavian football coach his opinion about his colleague living 45minutes away. And ask I said, not punish him.

Good night or is it good morning, it 4:30 am out here:yawn::yawn:.

Kenn
Mar 11, 2010, 01:48 PM
.



Austin,


Now its out, you hate the guy Amodu soo bad and thats it, all the rest is just bunkum, spin, after thought ati bee bee lo. So the guy is out now, you can all enjoy una after party. But no, the party cannot be fun, because of the evil that produced it. C'est la vie!


What evil? A coach is sacked and that's evil? Well, I'll like to see your dictionary! Look, I really don't care what your mind tells you about my feelings for Amodu. If it tells you, I hate him, stick with that. All I know is that he was not fit to be the coach of the Super Eagles and I'm comfortable with the decision to replace him. Even if he were my best friend sitting on the national bench and fumbling that much, I still would have been saying the same thing. So, go celebrate your hate discovery elsewhere. I don't have to hate Amodu to reject his brand of football.



If the coach does not enjoy the respect of its team, what does that say about the system that produced them both? Sorry, I forgot there's a ready made solution - to everything obviously - "get a foreign coach" and all will be well. Yeye.

Oh, we should beat on the system now? A coach cannot command the respect and confidence of his players and our immediate reaction would be to rail against the system? What system? The system that keeps recycling a stale Amodu when we know his limitations? Sorry, the immediate solution is to bring someone the players would respect, foreign or local, because that is where performance comes from. In our particular circumstance today, apart from the fact that we do not have the local coach that can command such respect, the Presidential Task Force had to work with a shortlist. Personally, I think they made the right choice from that shortlist.



You may call him "lucky", but a lucky-hero he still is - time and chance happens to everyone. And if I like I can erect a big fat statue of him and start worshipping it. But that will still not change the fact that those who sacked him did a very great injustice to a Nigerian hero - Chikena.

What injustice? Abeg, worship your statute and let the rest of football-loving humanity see road. We are going to South Africa and beyond and I'm happy we aren't going with Amodu.



And the question about Idi Amin; Meen, was I right you'd love the answer! Of course, your analogy was a bad one, and its even getting 'badder' by the minute. But since I don't seem to be clear enough to you, let me try again. My concern is not primarily about the nature of the question, but about the right to ask it - especially when there is the chance to and the context is relevant. Its like asking a professed Communist his opinion about a statement by Chairman Mao. Or a Scandinavian football coach his opinion about his colleague living 45minutes away. And ask I said, not punish him.

Pity.:sad:


...

Austin
Mar 11, 2010, 02:52 PM
.

Austin,
Pity.:sad:

...

Well, same here Pity, with a big P:cry::cry2:

megapro
Mar 17, 2010, 07:40 AM
Well, a coach that could not lead his country to SA has finally landed the Eagle's job. He is to be assisted by a Nigerian coach that has not none any serious coaching in the past 3 years. Nigeria we hail thee.

Source Kick off .com

Do you know Eguavoen won the Nigerian FA cup last year?

This guy is a model Nigerian coach.
humble and always willing to serve.

Always going for refresher courses and never hesitant to learn.

before leading the SE, he assisted Bonfere and CCC. After that he assisted Vogts, Cooreman (Enyimba) and now Lagerback. How many naija coaches will go from coach to assistant?

Eguavoen's competitive games with Nigeria:

Algeria 5:2
Zimbabwe 5:1
Ghana 1:0
Zimbabwe 2:1
Senegal 2:1
Tunisia 1:1 (6:5)
CIV 0:1
Senegal 1:0
Niger 2:0
Lesotho 1:0

Mikky jaga
Mar 17, 2010, 08:33 AM
before leading the SE, he assisted Bonfere and CCC. After that he assisted Vogts, Cooreman (Enyimba) and now Lagerback. How many naija coaches will go from coach to assistant?



Pls, I have nothing against Eguavoen whom I believe can perform even better than the Lagerbeer that was made his boss. But looking at his record as supplied by you above, he is a very good material for Oyibo boy boy. He has been in that condition for so long and under so many Oyibos that it will be easy to be another boy boy to Laggerbeer. Those that chose him must have realized that fact.

Kenn
Mar 17, 2010, 08:46 AM
Pls, I have nothing against Eguavoen whom I believe can perform even better than the Lagerbeer that was made his boss. But looking at his record as supplied by you above, he is a very good material for Oyibo boy boy. He has been in that condition for so long and under so many Oyibos that it will be easy to be another boy boy to Laggerbeer. Those that chose him must have realized that fact.

Airheadspeak...:rolleyes:

Eguavoen is doing his UEFA B badges right now, if you must know...

...

megapro
Mar 17, 2010, 12:10 PM
Pls, I have nothing against Eguavoen whom I believe can perform even better than the Lagerbeer that was made his boss. But looking at his record as supplied by you above, he is a very good material for Oyibo boy boy. He has been in that condition for so long and under so many Oyibos that it will be easy to be another boy boy to Laggerbeer. Those that chose him must have realized that fact.
Do you know the only African to coach a European team is Augustine Eguavoen?
If he could coach whitemen in 2001? why cant he work under black (Chukwu) and white coaches?

megapro
Mar 17, 2010, 12:47 PM
Yes he qualified for the ANC but what the country wanted then was a world cup slot as by then we had never been.

As to his van, I don't doubt you at all. So Kenn need not deliver you.

many facts are mixed up here.

Westerhof qualified for the Dakar ANC.
Hamilton qualified for the Algiers ANC.
Hamilton was not out of contention to qualify for the 1990 WC.
...So hamilton did not fail in his id to qualify for the WC.
Westerhof was hired and threw out the WC qualification in the last game in Yaounde.
Hoener (TA) was not sacked for Hamilton since Hamilton (assisted by Salami) was there before him anyway in the same capacity as chief coach.

Bunch17
Mar 17, 2010, 03:10 PM
many facts are mixed up here.

Westerhof qualified for the Dakar ANC.
Hamilton qualified for the Algiers ANC.
Hamilton was not out of contention to qualify for the 1990 WC.
...So hamilton did not fail in his id to qualify for the WC.
Westerhof was hired and threw out the WC qualification in the last game in Yaounde.

P W D L GF GA Points
1.Cameroon 6 4 1 1 9- 6 9
2.Nigeria 6 3 1 2 7- 5 7
3.Angola 6 1 2 3 6- 7 4
4.Gabon 6 2 0 4 5- 9 4

Were still in contention my foot. We needed to win the last match in Yaounde and lost 1:0. When last did Nigeria beat Cameroun at in Cameroun?

megapro
Mar 17, 2010, 03:45 PM
P W D L GF GA Points
1.Cameroon 6 4 1 1 9- 6 9
2.Nigeria 6 3 1 2 7- 5 7
3.Angola 6 1 2 3 6- 7 4
4.Gabon 6 2 0 4 5- 9 4

Were still in contention my foot. We needed to win the last match in Yaounde and lost 1:0. When last did Nigeria beat Cameroun at in Cameroun?

very poor. wetin do your foot? :lol:

we needed a simple draw, period.
before then, we had beaten Cameroun in Douala (WCQ) and drawn also with them in Yaounde.

Bunch17
Mar 17, 2010, 05:59 PM
very poor. wetin do your foot? :lol:

we needed a simple draw, period.
before then, we had beaten Cameroun in Douala (WCQ) and drawn also with them in Yaounde.

Source please! Do you perchance mean that we had beaten them in Nigeria?

megapro
Mar 17, 2010, 08:49 PM
Source please! Do you perchance mean that we had beaten them in Nigeria?
Are you a soccer fan?
always looking for sources.
even in nairaland they know their football.

Cameroun had never beaten Nigeria at home before Westerhof lost there,
and they have never beaten nNigeria at home after Westerhof lost there.

Nigeria matches against Cameroun A senior team.

0:0 lome
3:1 lagos
1:1 lagos 1972 WCQ
3:2 Douala 1972 WCQ
0:0 Algiers 1978 All African games
0:0 Yaounde
1:3 Abijan 1984 ACN Final
1:1 Rabat 1988 ACN
0:1 Casablanca 1998 ACN Final
2:0 Ibadan 1990 WCQ

0:1 Yaonde 1990 WCQ (Westerhof)

2:1 Dakar 1992 ACN 3rd place
2:2 Lagos
1:0 Tunis LG cup
2:2* Lagos 2000 ANC Finals (PKs)
3:0 Lagos LG cup
2:1 Monastir 2004 ACN QF.


After hamilton had flogged them 2:0 at Ibadan, Westerhof dropped Rufai at the MM airport for the crucial decider and took David Ngodigha and Aloy Agu Along.

Mikky jaga
Mar 18, 2010, 08:50 AM
Do you know the only African to coach a European team is Augustine Eguavoen?
If he could coach whitemen in 2001? why cant he work under black (Chukwu) and white coaches?

Now, you are talking like the rest colo mental people. What has the coaching of a European team got to do with competence to handle an African team? Just like the other one is talking as if a European Badge automatically translates to competency in coaching.