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DoubleWahala
Sep 18, 2009, 05:20 AM
Single molecule, one million times smaller than a grain of sand, pictured for first time

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/28/article-1209726-063617DB000005DC-474_468x241.jpg
The delicate inner structure of a pentacene molecule has been imaged with an atomic force microscope

It may look like a piece of honeycomb, but this lattice-shaped image is the first ever close-up view of a single molecule.

Scientists from IBM used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to reveal the chemical bonds within a molecule.

'This is the first time that all the atoms in a molecule have been imaged,' lead researcher Leo Gross said.

The researchers focused on a single molecule of pentacene, which is commonly used in solar cells. The rectangular-shaped organic molecule is made up of 22 carbon atoms and 14 hydrogen atoms.

In the image above the hexagonal shapes of the five carbon rings are clear and even the positions of the hydrogen atoms around the carbon rings can be seen.

To give some perspective, the space between the carbon rings is only 0.14 nanometers across, which is roughly one million times smaller than the diameter of a grain of sand.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/28/article-1209726-063792AB000005DC-428_468x286.jpg
Textbook model: A computer-generated image of how we're used to seeing a molecule represented with balls and sticks

'If you think about how a doctor uses an X-ray to image bones and organs inside the human body, we are using the atomic force microscope to image the atomic structures that are the backbones of individual molecules,' said IBM researcher Gerhard Meyer.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/28/article-1209726-063617C4000005DC-159_233x326.jpg
A 3D view showing how a single carbon monoxide molecule was used to create the image using a 'tuning fork' effect

The team from IBM Research Zurich said the results could have a huge impact of the field of nanotechnology, which seeks to understand and control some of the smallest objects known to mankind.

The AFM uses a sharp metal tip that acts like a tuning fork to measure the tiny forces between the tip and the molecule. This requires great precision as the tip moves within a nanometer of the sample.

'Above the skeleton of the molecular backbone (of the pentacene) you get a different detuning than above the surface the molecule is lying on,' Mr Gross said.

This detuning is then measured and converted into an image.

To stop the tip from absorbing the pentacene molecule, the researchers replaced the metal with a single molecule of carbon monoxide. This was found to be more stable and created weaker electrostatic attractions with the pentacene, creating a higher resolution image.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/28/article-1209726-063617F5000005DC-615_468x286.jpg
IBM researchers Nikolaj Moll, Reto Schlittler, Gerhard Meyer, Fabian Mohn and Leo Gross (l-r) stand behind an atomic force microscope Photo taken by Michael Lowry Image courtesy of IBM Research - Zurich

The experiment was also performed inside a high vacuum at the extremely cold temperature of -268C to avoid stray gas molecules or atomic vibrations from affecting the measurements.

'Eventually we want to investigate using molecules for molecular electronics,' Mr Gross said.

'We want to use molecules as wires or logic switches or elements.'

Source (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1209726/Single-molecule-million-times-smaller-grain-sand-pictured-time.html)

Fjord
Sep 18, 2009, 06:42 AM
That first image is extraordinary.

It's almost like it was faked.

Many governments have shot up nanotech research to the top of their grants as the technology of the future. Of course. we have no time for that.

Mikky jaga
Sep 19, 2009, 12:41 PM
You see any black man among the IBM crew? Wetin consign Agbero with overload? When they finish their molecular electronics, we go import am begin enjoy. Na so life be.

Namio
Sep 24, 2009, 02:57 PM
DW,

That looks exactly like what we have been working on all these years. It makes me wonder if our imagination fits the picture or if the picture fits our imagination. It could also be theory come true and working with the molecules may also have given practical idea of what they look like.

DoubleWahala
Sep 25, 2009, 01:29 AM
DW,

That looks exactly like what we have been working on all these years. It makes me wonder if our imagination fits the picture or if the picture fits our imagination. It could also be theory come true and working with the molecules may also have given practical idea of what they look like.

My broda, man's capacity to imagine is infinite. Indeed, people imagined what an atom/molecule would look like. From there, they used mathematical models built from the results of the behavior of elements and compounds, to narrow down the options, until they got to the current model which, as we're eventually finding out, bears an eerie similarity with the real thing. I bow!

Remember Albert Einstein? Do you know he was a Theoretical Physicist? In other words, his mind-boggling discoveries were made, not in some laboratory carrying out endless physical experiments, rather they were products of his very, very, fertile imagination, aided by his solid grasp of mathematics. In fact, when he mathematically computed the existence of black holes, it wasn't until decades later that his computations were proved to be in actual existence in space!

Fascinating stuff!!!

DW

Iye
Sep 25, 2009, 02:31 AM
Are you sure you are not that my physics prof.:D