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Mobolaji Aluko
Jan 7, 2009, 06:36 AM
<p><strong>The Differences Between Nigeria and Ghana - And What Nigeria Can Do About T</strong><strong>hem</strong></p> <p> <p ><strong>by Mobolaji E. Aluko, PhD<p> Burtonsville, MD, USA</strong></p></p> <hr /> <p><strong><u>Introduction</u></strong></p> <p>In the shadow of the recent and&nbsp;stupendously successful December 2007 presidential elections of our neighbor Ghana - and bearing in mind that as a result,&nbsp;today January 7, 2009, John Atta Mills of the NDC&nbsp;party&nbsp;takes over from John Kufuor of the NPP party as president - &nbsp;we Nigerians are in a period of intense soul-searching about our identity. </p> <p> <p> Well, explaining, without excusing, the differences&nbsp;between Ghana and Nigeria, we must understand that:</p> <p> <p>- geographically, Ghana is one-fourth the size of Nigeria; - population-wise, Ghana is one-seventh the population of Nigeria; </p> <p>- ethnically, Ghana is high-majority 45% Akan (with subunits Asante, Fante, etc.), with Mole-Dagbon 15.2%, Ewe 11.7%, Ga-Dangme 7.3%, Guan 4%, Gurma 3.6%, Grusi 2.6%, Mande-Busanga 1%, other tribes 1.4%, other 7.8% (2000 census; CIA information) </p></p></p> <p> <p>- religiously, Ghana is high-majority 68.8% Christian&nbsp;(Pentecostal/Charismatic 24.1%, Protestant 18.6%, Catholic 15.1%, other 11%), with Muslim 15.9%, traditional 8.5%, other 0.7%, none 6.1% (2000 census) - historically,&nbsp;its name evokes a once-glorious Ghana Empire (740s - 1250 AD) - even though that empire was nowhere&nbsp;even coterminous&nbsp;with modern-day Ghana - &nbsp;just as another West African country - &nbsp;Mali, &nbsp;that had successful elections in April 2007 despite fighting poverty - &nbsp;evokes also another once-glorious Mali Empire (&nbsp;1230 - 1600s AD)</p>- ideologically, the socialist beginnings of Ghana under Osagyefo Kwame Nkrumah (1909 - 1972, leader of Ghana from 1952 - 1966)&nbsp;gave the country some discipline, much residual of which exists today.&nbsp;Even the&nbsp;episodic succession of less colorful civilians like&nbsp;Kofi Abresia Busia (1913 - 1978, civilian prime minister from 1969-1972), and Hilla Liman (1934-1998, civilian president from 1979-1981), and John Kofi Agyekum Kufuor (1938 to date, civilian president from 2001-2009)&nbsp;- we omit Jerry Rawlings here (1947-to-date, civilian&nbsp;president from 1993 - 2001) -&nbsp;did not deem that exciting beginning. On January 7, 2009, John Atta Mills (1944-to-date) takes over from Kufuor for the next four to eight years. <p> <p> <p>- intellectually,&nbsp;the 1988 epic&nbsp;and fearless public lectures by the Ghanaian historical academic Prof. Albert Adu Boahen (1932 - 2006)&nbsp;on &quot;The Culture of Silence&quot; that had descended upon Ghana under the dictatorial rule of Flt Lt Jerry Rawlings,&nbsp;as well as his book on his perspectives&nbsp;on Ghana&nbsp;titled&nbsp;&quot;The Ghanaian Sphinx: Reflections on the Contemporary History of Ghana, 1972-1987&quot; [the Ghana-Academy of Arts and Sciences J.B. Danquah Memorial Lectures], may have given vibrant impetus for the restoration of multi-party democracy to the country.</p></p></p> <p>- academically, virtually ALL the civilian presidents have been&nbsp;doctoral degree holders and university professors, except soldier-turned-civilian leader Jerry Rawlings </p> <p> <p> -militarily,&nbsp;the history of military (in)discipline under Generals Joseph Arthur Ankrah (1915-1992, military ruler from 1966-1969), Akwasi Amankwaa Afrifa (1936-1979; military leader from 1969-70), Ignatius Kutu Acheampong (1931-1979, military ruler from 1972-1978), Frederic William Akuffo (1937-1979, military ruler from 1978-1979)&nbsp;and ending in Flight Lieutenant Jerry John Rawlings (1947-to-date, military ruler from June-September 1979, then again 1981 - 1993; civilian ruler from 1993 - 2001)&nbsp;clearing the augean stable (as it were) in 1979 by executing (or causing to be executed) Generals Acheamphong, Afrifa, and Fred Akuffo as well as Joy Amedume, Yaw Boakye, Roger Felli, Kotei, Utuka and Major Sam Acquah. &nbsp;Supreme Court Justices Kwadjo Agyei Agyepong, Frederick Sarkodie, and Cecilia Koranteng Addo were also not spared.</p> </p> <p>- diversity-wise, all the presidents, civilian and military, have over all of the years&nbsp;come from seven of the ten administrative regions (except Northern, Volta and Upper East regions);</p> <p> <p> <p>- politically, Ghana has a two-tier modern-traditional CONSTITUTIONAL arrangement:&nbsp;parallel to the central-region-district federal modern arrangement (similar to Nigeria's central-state-local government arrangement), there is still the traditional and constitutional national house of chiefs-regional house of chiefs - traditional councils arrangement that recognizes the traditional matrilineal-patrilineal- <wbr />chieftaincy traditions of Ghana.&nbsp;That parallel arrangement MAY ( a big qualified MAY) be giving Ghana a stability that Nigeria does not currently have. - divinely, God has now blessed Ghana with crude oil (to start being tapped in 2010), which He, in his massive mercy and infinite grace, had given to Nigeria rather prematurely since 1959, and which gift&nbsp;has since been&nbsp;ungraciously and ungratefully&nbsp;twisted into a curse by her leaders.</p> <p><strong><u>And How Might Nigeria Become Like Ghana?</u></strong> <p>How might we Ghanaianize Nigeria? This is the million-dollar question.&nbsp;However from the above observations, we might APPROXIMATE Ghana's conditions as follows:</p> <p>- we might need to divide&nbsp;Nigeria up&nbsp;up into 4, 8 or 12 more or less autonomous regions, each with about the same geographical area and/or population as Ghana, each with far greater ethnic and religious cohesion, and somehow introduce a traditional admnistrative system that parallels a modern presidential (or I would prefer parliamentary) system.&nbsp;</p> <p>- we might need to change our name to Songhai, </p> <p>- organize a hard-hitting Prof. Wole Soyinka national speaking tour.</p> <p>Other than those, there is nothing we can do with our non-ideological beginnings,&nbsp;or the fact that crude oil was discovered BEFORE our independence, (not AFTER it like in Ghana), or our indisciplined military history, although some would (unwisely) wish a military come-back, bloody or not.&nbsp;We just have to bear those as variables that will for ever make Nigeria distinct from Ghana.</p> <p>On top of all of&nbsp;that, we should all pray for greater divine intervention in our political and individual lives.</p> <p>There you have it. <p>______________________________ <wbr />______________________________ <wbr />______________________________ <wbr />______</p> </p></p> <p><strong><u>The Ghanaian Leadership &nbsp;Roll Call </u></strong></p> <p>Source (Wikipedia)</p> <ul> <li>Osagyefo Kwame Nkrumah (21 September 1909 - 27 April 1972; prime minister from March 6, 1957 1 July 1960; president of Ghana from 1 July 1960 24 February 1966); from Nkroful, Western Region; Nzima ethnic group.</li> <li>General Joseph Arthur Ankrah (18 August 1915 - 25 November 1992, military ruler from 24 February, 1966&nbsp;&nbsp;2 April, 1969); of the Ga ethnic group, around Accra capital</li> <li>General Akwasi Amankwaa Afrifa (24 April, 1936 - 26 June, 1979 ; military leader from 2 April, 1969&nbsp;&nbsp;3 April, 1970 ); from Mampong, Ashanti Region;</li> <li>Dr. Kofi Abresia Busia (11 July 1913 - 28 August 1978, civilian prime minister from October 1, 1969 January 13, 1972); from Wenchi, Brong Ahafo Region.</li> <li>General Ignatius Kutu Acheampong (23 September 1931 16 June 1979, military ruler from 13 January 1972 5 July 1978); from Kumasi, Ashanti Region.</li> <li>General Frederic William Akuffo (21 March 1937 26 June 1979, military ruler from 5 July, 1978&nbsp;&nbsp;4 June, 1979 ); from Akropong, Eastern Region</li> <li>Flight Lieutenant Jerry John Rawlings (22 June 1947 to date, military ruler from June 4 -September 24&nbsp;1979); born in Accra; mother is Ewe, father Scottish.</li> <li>Dr. Hilla Liman (12 December 1934 23 January 1998, civilian president from 24 September 1979 31 December 1981);&nbsp;from Gwollu, Upper West Region</li> <li>Flight Lieutenant Jerry John Rawlings (22 June 1947 to date, military ruler from 31 December 1981&nbsp;&nbsp;7 January 1993); father Scottish.</li> <li>Jerry Rawlings (22 June 1947 to date, civilian&nbsp;president from 7 January 1993&nbsp;&nbsp;7 January 2001 ); mother Ewe, father Scottish.</li> <li>Dr. John Kofi Agyekum Kufuor (8 December 1938 &nbsp;to date, civilian president from 7 January 2001&nbsp;&nbsp;7 January 2009 ); from Kumasi, Ashanti Region</li> <li>Prof. John Atta Mills (1944-to-date, civilian president from January 7, 2009 to ?);&nbsp;born Tarkwa, Western Region; hails from Ekumfi Otuam in the Mfantsiman East Constituency of the Central region </li></ul> <br><br><a target="_blank" href=http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=11143><b>..Read the full article</b></a><br>

Obugbe
Jan 7, 2009, 06:36 AM
Bolaji:

Your piece is a brilliant summary of the political growth of Ghana with its attendant success at democracy. What struck me was that almost all civilian presidents were doctors. Wow, probably explains the level of disciplined political culture witnessed during campaigns and at elections.

Indeed, Ghana has a good foundation and is now the true Black Star, blazing the trail for the rest of black Africa.

Nigeria cannot learn anything from Ghana, as long as we refuse to challenge the constitution foisted on us by the dullard military institution in Nigeria. The silent and corrupt zoning system of presidency must be done away with and above all, the people must be alive to their civic consciousness and must be ready to act to nip in the bud any attempt to render their votes and voices inconsequential.

Again, my brother, yours is a good analysis. And using your own words " shaking and scratching my head' as I listen to the shameless fraudsters in Abuja commend Ghana.

Tola Odejayi
Jan 7, 2009, 07:17 AM
Welcome back, Dr. Aluko.

As someone who has a lot of time for your articles, I'm afraid I have to say that this is not one of your best. Most of it is a recital of facts in the public domain - and the bit that I was interested in (how Nigeria might become like Ghana) is somewhat lacking:

- we might need to divide Nigeria up up into 4, 8 or 12 more or less autonomous regions, each with about the same geographical area and/or population as Ghana, each with far greater ethnic and religious cohesion, and somehow introduce a traditional admnistrative system that parallels a modern presidential (or I would prefer parliamentary) system. The bigger question is HOW??? Nations do not subdivide and coalesce spontaneously, especially if there are powerful people benefitting from the status quo.

- we might need to change our name to Songhai, I can't see how this would make any difference - you know that Gold Coast > Ghana made no difference in the first couple of decades of Ghana's independence.

- organize a hard-hitting Prof. Wole Soyinka national speaking tour. ?????

Other than those, there is nothing we can do with our non-ideological beginnings, or the fact that crude oil was discovered BEFORE our independence, (not AFTER it like in Ghana), or our indisciplined military history, although some would (unwisely) wish a military come-back, bloody or not. We just have to bear those as variables that will for ever make Nigeria distinct from Ghana. I think this is probably the koko of the matter.

allaccess
Jan 7, 2009, 12:58 PM
Welcome back, Dr. Aluko.

The bigger question is HOW??? Nations do not subdivide and coalesce spontaneously, especially if there are powerful people benefitting from the status quo.


Shoko Loko Bangoshe,

My question to you is, how do you intend to change the situation when people in the know like you have such fear for "powerful people" who are the problem?

People like us (you included) with access to education, cyberspace and an understanding of the issue must stick together and have a positive proactive voice, so that we might be able to educate the Nigerian masses on what needs doing. First we must educate ourselves and speak with one voice.

And oh, the prof is right, Nigeria is going nowhere in its current boundary arrangement. It must be changed from its current colonial make-up.

charles4u
Jan 7, 2009, 01:19 PM
Shoko Loko Bangoshe,

My question to you is, how do you intend to change the situation when people in the know like you have such fear for "powerful people" who are the problem?

People like us (you included) with access to education, cyberspace and an understanding of the issue must stick together and have a positive proactive voice, so that we might be able to educate the Nigerian masses on what needs doing. First we must educate ourselves and speak with one voice.

And oh, the prof is right, Nigeria is going nowhere in its current boundary arrangement. It must be changed from its current colonial make-up.


No matter what anybody says or thinks ..You have made a very good point in a simple sentence.

Nothing more to add, Those that understand and knows about this things should find a way of coming together as group with one voice and one determination (getting Nigeria better from the hands of the foolish politicians) and also edcuating and winning more majority of Nigerians. Simple.

It must first be changed from the system and people in control (this is what the majority of Nigerians needs to voice out), then things will start to change by a form of reformations and system of transpiracy governance which will be demanded and protested by Nigerians (majorities).

But if it still remains on the hands of this same people with this same system...then am afraid we have a long long way to go.

akuluouno
Jan 7, 2009, 01:23 PM
Hmm Prof,

I think the differences are deeper than you have just highlighted. Ghanaians set out from independence to build a nation while Nigeria kept playing to the gallery. We also missed the Rawlings massacre of expired former leaders, a feat that the abortive April 22 putsch probabaly wanted to achieve.
Finally the speedy manner that the Mills oppnent quickly conceded victory in spite of pressures by his party to go to court, is one of those issues that I have decided, for want of a better word, to call the Victorian sentiment of noblesse oblige.::rose: especailly at critical times in our national lives aware of Nigeria's preeminient role among the African global community.
I have always been attacked anytime I use this word in the village, but on a closer examination, it would be found that that that, indeed is critically lacking among our poilitical class in particular and all persons in authority in Nigeria in general.
Atta Mills and his opponent showed this sentiment at a time it really matttered to the glory of Ghana and acclaim of the international community and this is the real difference between Ghana and Nigeria.

tonsoyo
Jan 7, 2009, 01:27 PM
Good job Prof. Great analysis. You said it all when you talked about restructuring Nigeria into about 4, 8 or 12 autunomous regions. I am also with you on the Parliamentary system, the present Presidential system is unnecessarily too large and wasteful.

I also belong to the group wishing a military come back in form of divine intervention in order for us to realize the change that we desire.

It is never going to happen with our present composition and the visible line of succession created and being perpetuated by this band of robbers.

Tonsoyo.

afaukwu
Jan 7, 2009, 02:03 PM
Well said, Mr. Aluko. Indeed, to attain near-flawless democracy like Ghana, Nigeria needs to be divided into at least ten, based on ethnic and religious affiliations, so that each division can try to be like Ghana :lol:. What is that our self-assuming appealation again? Giant clay of Africa..........

Tola Odejayi
Jan 7, 2009, 02:17 PM
Shoko Loko Bangoshe,

My question to you is, how do you intend to change the situation when people in the know like you have such fear for "powerful people" who are the problem?
And where did I say in my response that I had "such fear for 'powerful people' who are the problem"?

Read my response again carefully. I am asking the prof HOW he expects boundaries to change. I am NOT saying that boundary change is good or bad.




People like us (you included) with access to education, cyberspace and an understanding of the issue must stick together and have a positive proactive voice, so that we might be able to educate the Nigerian masses on what needs doing. First we must educate ourselves and speak with one voice.
Actually, it is unrealistic to expect people to speak with one voice. I don't believe there is One Single Way to change the status quo; people should form themselves into different groups and each group should try whatever they think will work. If they wish, they can work with other groups - but they shouldn't wait for everyone to be in agreement with them before they get to work.




And oh, the prof is right, Nigeria is going nowhere in its current boundary arrangement. It must be changed from its current colonial make-up.
That's another debate for another day.

Bolaji Aluko
Jan 7, 2009, 02:23 PM
Shoko Loko Bangoshe and others:

Thanks for your comments so far.

Please see same essay on my website, with its update,


http://www.nigerianmuse.com/essays/mid-week-musings-the-differences-between-nigeria-and-ghana-and-what-nigeria-can-do-about

which reads, inter alia:


QUOTE

And How Might Nigeria Become Like Ghana?


How might we Ghanaianize Nigeria? This is the million-dollar question. However from the above observations, we might APPROXIMATE Ghana's conditions as follows:

- we will need (via a sovereign national conference to be followed by a referendum-approved popular national Constitution) to agree to sub-divide Nigeria up up into 4, 6, 8, 10 or 12 more or less autonomous regions, each with about the same or less geographical area and/or population as Ghana, each with far greater ethnic and religious cohesion, each with its own regional constitution, and also constitutionally introduce a traditional admnistrative system that parallels a modern presidential system. I would prefer the less costly and more accountable parliamentary system.

- we might need to change our name to Songhai, to complement Ghana and Mali.

- constitutionally insist on minimum high academic qualifications for our chief executives; granted that this might be a necessary but not sufficient requirement.

- organize a hard-hitting national speaking tour by (for example) Prof. Wole Soyinka, a la Prof. Adu Boahen, to fully sensitize the nation about democratic instincts.

Other than those, there is nothing we can do with our non-ideological beginnings, or the fact that crude oil was discovered BEFORE our independence, (not AFTER it like in Ghana), or our indisciplined military history, although some would (unwisely) wish a military come-back, bloody (a la Rawlings 1979) or not. We just have to bear those as variables that will for ever make Nigeria distinct from Ghana.

On top of all of that, we should all pray for greater divine intervention in our political and individual lives.

There you have it.

UNQUOTE


Best wishes.


Bolaji Aluko

charles4u
Jan 7, 2009, 02:37 PM
I'm sorry to say but I dont see how and why we have to compare ourselfs with Ghana when we dont seem to be equal in any way. (population, size and so on)

I think we just have to find our own way to make things better, I believe Nigeria's problem is from the top and we should find a way to solve it from the top cus solving it from down will be waste of time if this same people with their same system remains there.

tonsoyo
Jan 7, 2009, 02:38 PM
Shoko Loko Bangoshe and others:

Thanks for your comments so far.

Please see same essay on my website, with its update,


http://www.nigerianmuse.com/essays/mid-week-musings-the-differences-between-nigeria-and-ghana-and-what-nigeria-can-do-about

which reads, inter alia:


QUOTE

And How Might Nigeria Become Like Ghana?


How might we Ghanaianize Nigeria? This is the million-dollar question. However from the above observations, we might APPROXIMATE Ghana's conditions as follows:

- we will need (via a sovereign national conference to be followed by a referendum-approved popular national Constitution) to agree to sub-divide Nigeria up up into 4, 6, 8, 10 or 12 more or less autonomous regions, each with about the same or less geographical area and/or population as Ghana, each with far greater ethnic and religious cohesion, each with its own regional constitution, and also constitutionally introduce a traditional admnistrative system that parallels a modern presidential system. I would prefer the less costly and more accountable parliamentary system.

- we might need to change our name to Songhai, to complement Ghana and Mali.

- constitutionally insist on minimum high academic qualifications for our chief executives; granted that this might be a necessary but not sufficient requirement.

- organize a hard-hitting national speaking tour by (for example) Prof. Wole Soyinka, a la Prof. Adu Boahen, to fully sensitize the nation about democratic instincts.

Other than those, there is nothing we can do with our non-ideological beginnings, or the fact that crude oil was discovered BEFORE our independence, (not AFTER it like in Ghana), or our indisciplined military history, although some would (unwisely) wish a military come-back, bloody (a la Rawlings 1979) or not. We just have to bear those as variables that will for ever make Nigeria distinct from Ghana.

On top of all of that, we should all pray for greater divine intervention in our political and individual lives.

There you have it.

UNQUOTE


Best wishes.


Bolaji Aluko


Prof.
I have seen your idealistic approach to the change, now let us talk about a realistic approach to the change we need.

Those who benefit from the present arrangement owns the businesses, have the money, control some powerful mechanisms of governance and have a vested interest in the status quo.

This change is therefore not going to come easy. Soyinka has always been speaking on the road, the yearning for the Sovereign National Conference have been out there for ages. It is time for a piece of action.

Let the progressive elements work to identify the progressive elements in our military and do the needful. Clear this mess once and for all.

It is this intervention by the progressive group in the military that can clear the way for these plans. I know how difficult it is for a figure like you to openly support a plan like this, because the boys will be waiting for you at the MMA when next you visit Nigeria and charge you for treason.

But this is the most visible way to get this change, nothing good comes easy.

Obugi
Jan 7, 2009, 02:43 PM
All,


On top of all of that, we should all pray for greater divine intervention in our political and individual lives - Bolaji Aluko.

With divine intervention, everything will fall into place. Why do we need anything else when God himself will perform wonders for us? We patiently await his miraculous transformation of Nigeria.

Thank you, Dr Aluko.


Obugi.

charles4u
Jan 7, 2009, 02:48 PM
Prof.

Let the progressive elements work to identify the progressive elements in our military and do the needful. Clear this mess once and for all.

It is this intervention by the progressive group in the military that can clear the way for these plans..

Military ??????? I'm sure you know those who controls the military have been the past and present rulers of Nigeria..(Muslims converted to christian in the name of money).

I personally dont wish for military intervention and definitely dont support the idea they can do anything positive.

allaccess
Jan 7, 2009, 02:49 PM
Prof,

I disagree with the numbers of 6,8,10 or so. Nigerians Can be subdivided into

1. Northern Nigeria
- That region is bound together by religion and ethnicity that has seen them become the most united part of Nigeria, I see no reason to split a very peaceful marriage.

2. Biafra:
- this people like their northern counterparts have one of the most united people in the entity called Nigeria, they were and are still willing to stay united, and breakaway from the union while remaining bound together in a common cause. so no need to further sub-divide the Igbos.

3. Southern Nigeria
- this can include the middle belt region who are in danger of a hausa/Fulani genocide and reprisal attacks (whenever suits); now, there have been very minute cases of ethnic clashes in packets but by and large this regions is relatively safe and able to co-exist as a union. My only concern is how the middle belt people from places like Benue and Plateau will feel.

We cannot turn Nigerian into breakaway countries unable to sustain themselves afterwards and end up becoming a burden on the regions they were trying to get away from in the first place. I think we have learnt that lesson from unrealistic Nigeria state creations.

tonsoyo
Jan 7, 2009, 02:53 PM
Military ??????? I'm sure you know those who controls the military have been the past and present rulers of Nigeria..(Muslims converted to christian in the name of money).

I personally dont wish for military intervention and definitely dont support the idea they can do anything positive.


Then why compare Nigeria to Ghana, have you heard of man named J.J. Rawlings? His story will tell you how Ghanaians transformed from shoe-makers and unskilled photographers in Nigeria to what they are now. Yes, he was a military man.

charles4u
Jan 7, 2009, 03:10 PM
Then why compare Nigeria to Ghana, have you heard of man named J.J. Rawlings? His story will tell you how Ghanaians transformed from shoe-makers and unskilled photographers in Nigeria to what they are now. Yes, he was a military man.

So in this case, You saying military should take part or it should be military full time ?

Can all you supporters of military give reasons and explain how military can work to make Nigeria better ...since we have used them for years and it was failure and we believe they can work now.

Pls lets stop giving Ghana as example when they are just quater of Nigeria with even just 1 or 2 ethnic citizens....but Nigeria has almost 5 tribes with different ethnicities and traditions...this are what we should put together before thinking of an idea that will favour some and will not favour some. (Back to square one).

I'm waiting for the explaination.

tonsoyo
Jan 7, 2009, 03:24 PM
[QUOTE=charles4u;309832]So in this case, You saying military should take part or it should be military full time ?

Can all you supporters of military give reasons and explain how military can work to make Nigeria better ...since we have used them for years and it was failure and we believe they can work now.

Only a good Military guy can give us the paradigm shift that we required. It is never going to happen from those who are benefitting from the status quo. Why is that so difficult to understand?

No matter how many times you throw up a coin it will always land on its side.

I only advocate Military regime as an intervention.

If you are waiting for the so called revolution or when there will be a Sovereign National Conference to be called by these politicians, you will have to wait till thy Kingdom comes...

charles4u
Jan 7, 2009, 04:54 PM
[quote]

Only a good Military guy can give us the paradigm shift that we required. It is never going to happen from those who are benefitting from the status quo. Why is that so difficult to understand?

No matter how many times you throw up a coin it will always land on its side.

I only advocate Military regime as an intervention.

If you are waiting for the so called revolution or when there will be a Sovereign National Conference to be called by these politicians, you will have to wait till thy Kingdom comes...

If am going to wait till Kingdom comes for revolution or whatever, Then tell me when military intervention will come true brother ?

I didnt say I was waiting for our government or politicians either, I was giving the idea of we the citizens should gradually start from somewhere, Nobody will do it for us cus all of this foreign countries are using Nigeria for their benefits. Military are controlled by this same people that rule Nigeria my brother and you stated a good military guy (which guy...for 140million people)..U are funny :D

I asked for the way and how the military intervention will be but you repeated the same word of military and intervention without any explaination. There is no doubt that military will never rule Nigeria again cus they haver failed till now and you asking them to come back ? or ?

i-go-better
Jan 7, 2009, 05:28 PM
So in this case, You saying military should take part or it should be military full time ?

Can all you supporters of military give reasons and explain how military can work to make Nigeria better ...since we have used them for years and it was failure and we believe they can work now.

Pls lets stop giving Ghana as example when they are just quater of Nigeria with even just 1 or 2 ethnic citizens....but Nigeria has almost 5 tribes with different ethnicities and traditions...this are what we should put together before thinking of an idea that will favour some and will not favour some. (Back to square one).

I'm waiting for the explaination.


Charles4u
Tonsoyo is stating the only realistic alternative. PDP has made it clear that it will continue to rape Nigeria for 60yrs and with all the Political "leaders" "S"elected on the platform of other Political Parties falling over each other in their frenzied scramble to decamp to PDP; Student Unions ravaged with cultism, prostitution, kidnapping, thuggery, etc; civil service activism in delibrate slumber, a military intervention is the only unfortunate option.

Military guys in the mold of Kaduna Nzegwu/Abubakar Umar, honestly detribalised individuals, I believe, are still housed in the Nigerian Miliatry formations.

konkomitant
Jan 7, 2009, 06:30 PM
We cannot and will never be like Ghana because we are two different countries with completely different history.
What we have to do is work out our own salvation with fear and trembling instead of comparing Nigeria with every dick and harry. Today we compare our election with that of USA, tomorrow with that of other western country that have gone through their birth pain long time ago. Is it low self esteem or inferiority complex?

We cannot produce an Obama because we did not keep any race under slavery and oppression for more than 400 years!

Ghana had gold before they recently found oil, and what did they do with the gold?

If you must compare Nigeria's electoral system with that of Ghana then we need another 8 years to perform elections like the one they did in 2008, which by then they would have been another 8 years ahead of us.

lumumba
Jan 7, 2009, 06:48 PM
[quote]

Only a good Military guy can give us the paradigm shift that we required. It is never going to happen from those who are benefitting from the status quo. Why is that so difficult to understand?

No matter how many times you throw up a coin it will always land on its side.

I only advocate Military regime as an intervention.

If you are waiting for the so called revolution or when there will be a Sovereign National Conference to be called by these politicians, you will have to wait till thy Kingdom comes...



There is nothing like a "good military guy." J. J Rawlings "cleared" his comrades-in -arms, those that participated in the 1979 putsch, killed or ran them out of the country in order to establish his rule. What about Benin's Serekou and Aikpe? Or the Dergue in Ethiopia? While some may take the recent elections in Ghana as a justification for Rawlings actions, that does not mean such is the only possible action that can get us to where we need to be. For example, we quite correctly blame the vagabonds in power for everything under the sun; but how about our own lapses that made it possible for these vagabonds to continue perpetrating their crime? Did we, including the very good Prof Aluko, not "surrender" our political acumen to so-called progressive politicians such that at particular historical junctures, we failed to stand up against these "progressives"?
Methinks God has been very generous to us in providing us absolute revolutionary moments, but we have always failed to take it up. So, what we need to do is to examine our shortcomings during those revolutionary moments and take our cue from there. And the revolution includes changing the current structure.

M. Akosa
Jan 7, 2009, 07:07 PM
I have always said it unapologetically several times that Nigeria is too big to be a country that serves the best needs of its citizens, given the geographical, socio cultural and religious diversities.

The way it is right now have never and will never allows us to be protectors of one another, or to care for each other. We have so much to seperate us than to unite us, and our leaders have consistently played on this to hurt us even further and continue the loot and destruction of the nation, even the dumbest of our inept leaders easily understand this problem and use it without care against Nigerians.

The very first and foremost solution to the Nigerian dilemma is to break the nation into smaller, and easily manageable countries, where the citizens at least share similar values, languages, histories and socio cultural practices.

Palamedes
Jan 7, 2009, 08:12 PM
Aluko starts the article by first creating an imaginary need, urgency or even an emptiness: He says, "We Nigerians are in a period of intense soul-searching about our identity” He then proceeds to find a 'wonder solution,' namely, how to ghana-nize Nigeria. I shall concern myself only with this claim and the one about “traditional administrative system.”

Indeed Aluko is neither the first nor last to want to effing-nize Nigeria. Others have suggested kosovo-nizing, scotland-nizing, usa-nizing, balkanizing, botswana-nizing etc. The "...soul-searching” belongs to Aluko and only he can possibly gauge the level of its intensity.

Aluko seems to forget the time when Ghanaians wanted to be like Nigerians and voted with their feet en mass--I think, it was in the 1970-80s. Perhaps, it was as well that Ghanaians didn't nigerianize Ghana, otherwise, Aluko would have great difficulty suggesting how a nigerianized ghana could ghananize Nigeria.

But, there is serious malaise beneath this article—and I have seen it in many an article written by the so-called enlightened Nigerians. Between the lines, the reader would find the psychology of many of these presentations.

Independence of... is the quality and capability of a person or people to find their own way, their homegrown solutions and not one imported (verbatim) from another locale--even a locale such as Ghana with many similitude of... with Nigeria. I however blame our education systems for its failure to equip us for these tasks. Systems scientist will tell you (something that is so obvious) that Ghana as a systems is far simpler compared with Nigeria. “Nuff said.”

Aluko recommends that we “introduce a traditional administrative system,” but I initially interpreted his use of “traditional” lightly until I saw “modern presidential” in the same sentence. Revising my understanding, I ask Aluko, what he thinks we currently have in our governments (indeed since our so-called independence?) It seems that Aluko has not studied our modern demagogues closely.

Are all Nigerian governments–even the military ones—simply not modern versions of our traditional systems? Indeed all Nigerian governments have run on traditional philosophy. Isn't democracy simply an injection, which gives the Nigerian people the [misused] power and opportunity to change the guards once every four years? However, tradition runs deep, and in governments, the modern demagogues act (minus the absolutism) as their [traditional] demagogues predecessors once did.

Indeed, how could it not be? From childhood, we lean about our tradition, in our teens, we rebel against it, we grow to hate or love it; and the older we become, the more we are drawn to it like 'black holes.' In principle, we are democratic but in practice our elected officials govern in the traditional manner of the old. Aluko, sir, we already have a [neo-]traditional administrative system in place. We the Nigeria people even call our elected officials [inappropriately] our RULERS. “Nuff said.”

Here is an example of how people can disagree on one set of issues and agree on others: I am a fan of the Old Songhai Empire and it is my favourite in West Africa; and as one who advocates the unification of West Africa, I would like to see a unified West Africa named Songhai [African] Republic.

overdryv
Jan 7, 2009, 08:36 PM
Charles4u
Tonsoyo is stating the only realistic alternative. PDP has made it clear that it will continue to rape Nigeria for 60yrs and with all the Political "leaders" "S"elected on the platform of other Political Parties falling over each other in their frenzied scramble to decamp to PDP; Student Unions ravaged with cultism, prostitution, kidnapping, thuggery, etc; civil service activism in delibrate slumber, a military intervention is the only unfortunate option.

Military guys in the mold of Kaduna Nzegwu/Abubakar Umar, honestly detribalised individuals, I believe, are still housed in the Nigerian Miliatry formations.

Think again. Nigeria has been having military "saviors" down the years when civilians get overly corrupt but the boys later turn out to be looters. The only coup that come close to setting Nigeria on the right track was Nzeogwu's coup. If you are realistic you'd admit that the only coup that has any chance of success is the one initiated by a northern officer. I believe those in the south are fed up with scenarios in which those caliphate soldiers take over radio stations. If we are truly one country why cant one of our own organize a coup without the country going into civil war? It is akin to only they having the wisdom and knowledge to fight corruption.

Back on the main topic, what is the point of trying to be like Ghana? Like one villager mentioned, Ghanaians are normal people but Nigerians are not. For now lets content ourselves sending our presidents to partake in swearing in ceremony of their president elect. At least lets share the good feelings even when we know we can never conduct a fair and free election. Nigeria has never been with a humane government for a long time. What we have now is situation of no government. What about adopting the right name which is anarchy?

Dr Olayiwola Ajileye
Jan 7, 2009, 08:38 PM
Interesting thread here, Ghana and Nigeria!!! Do you know that we already have a government in power for the next 60 years in Nigeria? It is not by popular election, it is by arrogant pronounciation, the plan to achieve that is been concluded, no vote, no matter how free and fair will ever count in Nigeria for the next 60 years. Not that i wish this to happen, but given the confidence with which that assertion was made, we know as Nigerians what that really means when it comes to elections.

But Ghana, were humble and sophisticated enough to count their own votes, the supreme court judges dont need to be lobbied, no political assasinations needed to take place, it was not a do or die affair, it was about the people and progress as a nation, not about personalities, it was about democratic decorum and statemanship, incumbent to opposition, done twice in 8 years. it has never happened before in the history of democratic Nigeria. So where lies the similarity between the two countries?

Solution -Fashola AC Vs AKunyili (PDP) 2011, new INEC, neutral incumbent, no violence or political intimidation, no ethnic or gender bigotry, useful and robust presidential debates about key issues on national development and challenges, diverse views of approach to tackling them, people's votes and choice as expressed by the ballot boxes, quick release of results, neutral judiciary, strong opposition and vibrant parliament and civil society.

These are the recipe for good democratic progress in Nigeria....No more, no less, no military!:no:

Onari
Jan 7, 2009, 08:40 PM
I have a lot of problem understanding why people think that dividing Nigeria into regions will bring the required leadership and development. Common sense to me shows that the breaking of Nigeria with same attitude will yield same result and nothing on ground or that has happened before shows that Nigeria if broken up will change attitude of leaders. Look at the leaders from all parts of the country have the same trait...corruption. So if these same people at the end of the day will take up the regional leadership, then it is more of the same.

For example we shouted power shift and truly power came to the South via OBJ, How has OBJ presidency changed the fortune of an average Yoruba man? True his cronies and friends benefited, but how did it affect the common Yoruba men and women on the main street?

Nigeria's problem is enveloped in one word Indiscipline.The level of indiscipline of the leaders and the followers is appalling (especially the leaders) and without tackling this monster, I am sorry we can not go any where, we will continue to complain, change policy, shuffle government, make power shift blah blah blah, and we will still remain stagnant.

It is better we forget the break up of Nigeria mantra and focus on how to kick out the cabals who have conquered the Nigerian people... from south to west, east to North , the leadership continue to be a failure and a problem to the main street Nigeria.

We the Nigerian people have to decide if we want to live with it as it is now or get off our butt and fight through it collectively for shared common wealth, prosperity and responsibility. Our destiny no matter which region or tribe we belong to, is intrinsically tied together one way or the other. I prefer a diverse cultural Nigeria where Hausa, Ijaw, kalabari, Igbo, Efik, Igala, Tivi, Yoruba etc will live together in justice and peace than a divided monolithic region.

Good health facility, clean water, good road, quality education, efficient power supply, good housing, good employment opportunity etc does not have a regional tag. Honest, innovative, passionate, hardworking and pragmatic leadership should be our collective goal and other things will follow.

lumumba
Jan 7, 2009, 08:59 PM
[QUOTE=Onari;309991]I have a lot problem understanding why people think that dividing Nigeria into regions will bring the required leadership and development. Common sense to me shows that the breaking of Nigeria with same attitude will yield same result and nothing on ground or that has happened before shows that Nigeria if broken up will change attitude of leaders. Look at the leaders from all parts of the country have the same trait...corruption. So if these same people at the end of the day will take up the regional leadership, then it is more of the same.

For example we shouted power shift and truly power came to the South via OBJ, How has OBJ presidency changed the fortune of an average Yoruba man? True his cronies and friends benefited, but how did it affect the common Yoruba men and women on the main street?



What you forget is that the socio-cultural environment plays a part in leadership development. Hence, when ethno-cultural entities have control of their environment and are able to develop it , they will be able to contain whatever contradictions that may arise. But when you have a "non-cultural" nation like Nigeria, then, anything goes. The power shift to the South you mentioned is, I am sure you know, merely a geographical shift, for the Yoruba themselves rejected Obasanjo in 1999, hence his resort to brute force to retain himself in power in 2003 and 2007.

tonsoyo
Jan 7, 2009, 09:04 PM
[
QUOTE=Dr Olayiwola Ajileye;309990]
Solution -Fashola AC Vs AKunyili (PDP) 2011, new INEC, neutral incumbent, no violence or political intimidation, no ethnic or gender bigotry, useful and robust presidential debates about key issues on national development and challenges, diverse views of approach to tackling them, people's votes and choice as expressed by the ballot boxes, quick release of results, neutral judiciary, strong opposition and vibrant parliament and civil society.

These are the recipe for good democratic progress in Nigeria....No more, no less, no military!:no:[/QUOTE]

If wishes were horses.....

lumumba
Jan 7, 2009, 09:07 PM
Solution -Fashola AC Vs AKunyili (PDP) 2011, new INEC, neutral incumbent, no violence or political intimidation, no ethnic or gender bigotry, useful and robust presidential debates about key issues on national development and challenges, diverse views of approach to tackling them, people's votes and choice as expressed by the ballot boxes, quick release of results, neutral judiciary, strong opposition and vibrant parliament and civil society.

These are the recipe for good democratic progress in Nigeria....No more, no less, no military!:no:



We have heard all of these (and more) homilies ad infinitum. But what is the grundnorm? On what foundation will these be built? That is the million dollar/pound/naira question.

Onari
Jan 7, 2009, 09:11 PM
[QUOTE=Onari;309991]I have a lot problem understanding why people think that dividing Nigeria into regions will bring the required leadership and development. Common sense to me shows that the breaking of Nigeria with same attitude will yield same result and nothing on ground or that has happened before shows that Nigeria if broken up will change attitude of leaders. Look at the leaders from all parts of the country have the same trait...corruption. So if these same people at the end of the day will take up the regional leadership, then it is more of the same.

For example we shouted power shift and truly power came to the South via OBJ, How has OBJ presidency changed the fortune of an average Yoruba man? True his cronies and friends benefited, but how did it affect the common Yoruba men and women on the main street?





What you forget is that the socio-cultural environment plays a part in leadership development. Hence, when ethno-cultural entities have control of their environment and are able to develop it , they will be able to contain whatever contradictions that may arise. But when you have a "non-cultural" nation like Nigeria, then, anything goes. The power shift to the South you mentioned is, I am sure you know, merely a geographical shift, for the Yoruba themselves rejected Obasanjo in 1999, hence his resort to brute force to retain himself in power in 2003 and 2007.

I understand what you are saying, but that OBJ was rejected by Yourba during the election did not obliterate the fact that Yourba's later rallied around him and supported him, at least the pretenscious Yourba leaders did.

However, I do strongly disagree with you that social-cultural environment plays a part in development. Lets take Ogun State or Rivers for example, how has this states utilize the money they have gotten for the welfare of their people? Is one part of the nation controlling what they could do with the money?

I am totally convinced that if past and present leaders have done the needful, the idea of tribal and regional sentiment will not arise...looking at West, for example probably apart from Fashola, all other Governors have failed their people, same thing is happening in the South-South, North, East etc.

charles4u
Jan 7, 2009, 09:18 PM
Majority seems not to support this idea of military thing and neither do they support separation But they seem to support the idea of making things right within the system.

I still dont understand what military gat to do with this as some brothers have said they its the military that can get us out of this mess, First we have used this military whatever for many year and this same people and sysatem have are part of the downfall of Nigeria today, This same people are the ones that control Nigeria from military level to democratic, I still dont believe military can help us cus am sure their top officials are working with this same set of people we are talking about. How can we even trust military when we have used them in the past and they failed, What will the military even offer us if we use them ? Democracy or communist ?

According to some opinions here of making things right...instead of separation, We all wont things right and a better Nigeria but considering on the issues of the problems Nigeria is facing which is just not politically alone..Can tribal, traditional, ethnics groups and religion problems ever die in Nigeria ?..I dont think so except God comes be the president.

In as much as I dont wanna support separation but seems to be the prefarable option we have to make not just political stability alone but with peace even with peace. Who can be president that Nigerians wont have regional complains ?...If Igbos gets there ..complains...same as if others gets there.

charles4u
Jan 7, 2009, 09:24 PM
[quote=lumumba;310002]
I am totally convinced that if past and present leaders have done the needful, the idea of tribal and regional sentiment will not arise...looking at West, for example probably apart from Fashola, all other Governors have failed their people, same thing is happening in the South-South, North, East etc.


U made a very good point here which have said to some people, but the level it is now is too open and complicated to go back.

The Biafrans have understand what money is and the benefit for them if they separate. everybody see things clearer now...so lets talk on the present and future.

Do we all think there can be peace even between the citizens ? apart from political issues ?...hatred as grone and the is so much of dislikes..what can resolve this issue when 10% wants this, 10% wants another, 10% wants another, 10% wants another..and so on.so much problems have biuld up from this mistakes and mis-understands in the 1960s

ajede
Jan 7, 2009, 09:35 PM
This is another brilliant piece that presents succint information that any thinking person might need to analyze the what and why as relate to Nigeria's ugly failure vis vis Ghana's shining success. It may be true that the information is available in public space, but mining and assemble it as is done here is commendable. One thing, amongst others, that stands out is that Nigeria is still waiting for the opportunity to kill those shameless thieves that have ruined us, continue to destroy the future of our children, and yet still go around as powerful people. We are all too cowardly to free ourselves and redeem the future for our children.

lumumba
Jan 7, 2009, 10:02 PM
[quote=Onari;310012][quote=lumumba;310002]


I understand what you are saying, but that OBJ was rejected by Yourba during the election did not obliterate the fact that Yourba's later rallied around him and supported him, at least the pretenscious Yourba leaders did.
You are right about the pretentious ones--and that makes all the difference. OBJ would not have gone "do or die" if proper Yoruba supported him. And we all know there was no election in 2007.


However, I do strongly disagree with you that social-cultural environment plays a part in development. Lets take Ogun State or Rivers for example, how has this states utilize the money they have gotten for the welfare of their people? Is one part of the nation controlling what they could do with the money?
The examples you gave are still operating within the "non-cultural" Nigeria, hence they are susceptible to its foibles. We cannot moralise with a vagabond by asking what he/she has done with the common patrimony; its mere existence as a vagabond in power is all about brigandage. The Nigerian system, as it currently is, was set up for brigandage, that is why they are all over the place. If you go back to the first republic, you'll discover that even with the 'ten percenters", there was still a modicum of development and, at least in the Western region, the noveau riche did not exhibit their riches shamelessly, plus there are socio-cultural conditions that tended to check on the excesses of rogues in and out of government. That is now missing in this "non-cultural" Nigeria.

Onari
Jan 7, 2009, 10:29 PM
[quote=Onari;310012][quote=lumumba;310002]


I understand what you are saying, but that OBJ was rejected by Yourba during the election did not obliterate the fact that Yourba's later rallied around him and supported him, at least the pretenscious Yourba leaders did.
You are right about the pretentious ones--and that makes all the difference. OBJ would not have gone "do or die" if proper Yoruba supported him. And we all know there was no election in 2007.


However, I do strongly disagree with you that social-cultural environment plays a part in development. Lets take Ogun State or Rivers for example, how has this states utilize the money they have gotten for the welfare of their people? Is one part of the nation controlling what they could do with the money?
The examples you gave are still operating within the "non-cultural" Nigeria, hence they are susceptible to its foibles. We cannot moralise with a vagabond by asking what he/she has done with the common patrimony; its mere existence as a vagabond in power is all about brigandage. The Nigerian system, as it currently is, was set up for brigandage, that is why they are all over the place. If you go back to the first republic, you'll discover that even with the 'ten percenters", there was still a modicum of development and, at least in the Western region, the noveau riche did not exhibit their riches shamelessly, plus there are socio-cultural conditions that tended to check on the excesses of rogues in and out of government. That is now missing in this "non-cultural" Nigeria.

Lumumba,

I think we have a common objective here and it issimple, Let us do things properly at least on this we agree, which you have confirmed by talking about proper Yoruba did not support OBJ, this can also be translated to say that proper Nigerians do not support corruption. Displaying or not displaying wealth is not only in the West, it applies to every region. Also if development can be achieved in socio-cutural conditions, then me and you will not be in a foreign land and be at the top our profession.

Obugbe
Jan 8, 2009, 12:27 AM
The differences between Ghana and Nigeria are many:

a) Ghana's polity is more mature.

b) Religion does not play major role in politics. Sharia is a major factor in Nigeria.

c) Ethnic parity appears to exist, unlike Nigeria where ethnic minority/majority is always on the table.

d) No indigene status in a particular region. Nigeria has indigene status of citizens in states?

e) Educational polarity in Nigeria contibutes to backwardness. No such schism in Ghana.

f) Nigerian values pivoted on amassing wealth without labor, while Ghanaians believe in good wage for labor.

g) Ghana's educated elite are on a higher spiritual plane than their Nigerian counterpart, hence the peaceful resolution of the 0.5% margin election victory by the opposition.

There are many variables that show that Nigeria is way behind Ghana. Discussing the nuances as exhibited in the posts in this thread show that Nigerians like burying their heads in sand.

Dapxin
Jan 8, 2009, 01:22 AM
Interesting thread. This has all the color of multiple pages already.

I sense a feel of desperation and seeming helplessness - citizens of Nigeria....

Hmmm. I read on.

whyworry
Jan 8, 2009, 01:40 AM
This article is brief yet encyclopedic and coming right on time at this point in the unfortunate history of our Nigeria, i feel that we honestly do not need to be like Ghana. It is okay to acquire inspiration but not attempt to copiously achieve the feats of other countries. Ghana got to where they are without copying the hallucinating giant of Africa so, we Nigerians should be ourselves by looking inwards and telling ourselves the home truth because Nigeria lacks truth in all its ramifications. Why must we loose sleep over Ghana just because they have made their bed well and now sleep blissfully? The British never copied the French in their revolution, Americans evolved their own democracy without consulting the Canadians.

Interestingly, here in West Africa Ghana is not alone in this good news, there is a country called Senegal that is another democratic wonder in Africa, inspite of their poverty there has never been any military coup since their independence from April 4 1960 till date, in 2001, there was a neat transfer of power from the then ruling PS (Socialist Party) of Abdou Diouf to the opposition party/current ruling PDS (Senegalese Democratic Party) of Abdoulaye Wade.
Like Ghana, Senegal's electricity is stable, water supply is taken for granted everywhere, even social security and child benefits are paid out to qualified citizens. This is a 96% Muslim-3% christian nation which nationally observes all the christian holidays including All Saints/All Souls days (American version of Halloween) by declaring them work free days. I could go on.

But that truth we should admit of ourselves is that Nigeria is a constipated glutton who is in dire need of a purgative to stabilize the system, and the administration of any remedy must begin from the head to bottom. My only fear is that time is running out lest we head for the morgue.

DaBishop
Jan 8, 2009, 02:32 AM
Peoples:

True to type ya'all blow dogon turenchi and the rogues in da cabal rule.

1. Every country has faced its demons on the way to success politically or economically, including cabals and corruption.

2. Ghana had Rawlings did theirs, you may not agree with Qadaffi but he did it for his Libya. The US faced theirs, and even currently are facing Blago...

3. Nigerian intellectuals just blow grammar and serve barely literate persons calling them sir for a morsel. All these bad 'northern' governments who were their policy makers, advisers and ministers? I tell you sold out southerners! Who drafted all the bad laws and constitutions? How many Attorney's Generals have we had from the North since independence? Almost all southerners. How many have resigned out of principle? Who is IBB's chief trumpeter? Hint, na PhD SOUTHERNER!

4. So na PhD be good government now? Well, the US should cry because they do not have them. What is the caliber of Naija PhD, many who cannot sway anyone to their ideas/principles if they have any?

5. If we say, let us do something about it how many here will stand up to be counted? Many will rationalize their inaction that we did not get it just perfect, since they are perfect in their PhD analogies, they cannot join the ignorant to add their perfect education to our pidgin understanding...You get ma point...

Then someone says if we break up...as if we do not know of the intra-tribal wranglings...everyone knows it was not a mallam that killed Bola Ige...so their problems will be finnished if they separate, abi?

Arrogance, makes for poor organization. What will WS' grammar do to ma villager in Nnewi?
PhD too does not remove the tribal poison from some...check out a few threads here.
Abegi, I prefer Area Boys jare...at least they know what they want, crumbs, and they do not pretend.

Na me,

p.s. How many on this thread have signed the petition in circulation...just a test drive...
Grammar peoples:rolleyes:

If lawyers alone decide to take back the country, they can don their wigs and close Broad street Marina, Nigeria will be on CNN...for democracy...

Godwin
Jan 8, 2009, 09:42 AM
http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/editorial_opinion/article02//indexn2_html?pdate=070109&ptitle=Where%20were%20the%20fixers%20in%20Ghana?


Where were the fixers in Ghana?


THERE were moments of extreme anxiety last week, when it appeared as if Ghana had careered towards the vicinity of Nigeria's notorious reputation for acrimonious and bungled elections. Considering the severe battering they had received, officials of Nigeria's Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) would be forgiven if they were already sneering at their Ghanaian counterparts when news broke that the equanimity and maturity that benchmarked Ghana's general elections on December 7, had begun to give way to a cut-throat contest to secure the presidency. Ghana had been the toast of all with the exemplary conduct of its general elections on December 7, last year. But the presidential ballot was inconclusive, and a run-off was rescheduled for December 28. As close and intense as the first round of voting three weeks earlier, the presidential run-off was a cliff-hanger.

But the flurry of untoward events as the final results emerged left many wondering whether the encomiums showered on the country in the immediate aftermath of December 7 were not misplaced.

The presidential run-off threatened to unravel Ghana's reputation. Officials of the ruling New Patriotic Party (NPP) went to court, on New Year's Day, to secure an injunction forbidding the declaration of the final results of the election by the Electoral Commission of Ghana. The court sat on that day, but rather than grant the NPP ex-parte prayer, it directed the applicant to put all other parties on notice by way of service. The NPP also boycotted voting in the Tain constituency, where it had hoped to reverse its overall losing streak, and overtake the candidate of the opposition New Democratic Congress (NDC). Violence had flared in a few places. Politicians from either side had also ratcheted up the political temperature by levelling allegations of rigging against each other. Combined with the court action and the boycott, the mix was taking on a familiar colouration of election Nigeriana.

Yet, in pulling back from the brink, Ghana has important lessons for Nigeria, Zimbabwe and Kenya, where elections are a do-or-die affair. Today, Professor John Evans Atta-Mills, the opposition NDC candidate, is being sworn in as President of the Republic of Ghana. The transition catapults his immediate predecessor, John Kuffour, to a pedigree of statesmanship so thoroughly lacking these days on the African continent. While his party men were seeking to stop the announcement of the final results, Kuffour urged caution and restraint. His followers listened, and the party's candidate, the urbane ex-Foreign Minister Dr Nana Akufo-Addo conceded defeat. Clearly, if Kuffour and his ruling NPP wanted power at all costs, the court action would have landed them in a June 12 situation - with the results in suspended animation, precipitating a constitutional crisis and social upheaval.

Two days before he was due to handover, aware that all was well with his country's constitutional democracy, John Kuffour suggested a redrafting of the clause on the length of term of office for a President. It should be five, rather than four, years with no more than two terms, he suggested. The reason, according to him, being the necessity of sufficient time to follow through with projects. Kuffour did not make the proposal selfishly, knowing that he would not be qualified to run again. He respected his country's constitution, and today he steps down. It is worth reiterating that some other African leader would have courted and stoked chaos, in order to continue to rule and ruin.

Sweeping generalisations aside, it is fairly certain that what happened in Ghana in the past one month is unthinkable in Nigeria - whether of 2007; or of today. In the first round of voting, the ruling party's candidate won, although he fell short of the constitutional requirement of scoring at least 50 per cent of valid votes cast. Dr. Akufo-Addo scored 4,159,439, or 49.13 per cent. On the other hand, Atta-Mills had 4,056,634, that is, 47.92 per cent. Wouldn't the fixers of Nigeria's elections have overwhelmed INEC to simply "award" 50 per cent to Akufo-Addo, since 49.13 is nearer 50, than 47.92? The fixers of Nigeria's notorious elections would have rationalized the step in a number of ways: it would cost more money to arrange a run-off; since "our" candidate already has the majority votes, it is obvious that it is he who is wanted by the voters, otherwise they would have voted for the opposition; and, you see, the handover date is so close, we have to worry about the transition exercise; and, in any event, what is the value of incumbency if it cannot return a successor?

"We want continuity," the fixers would have retorted, and proceeded to alter the results in favour of the NPP candidate. To achieve that objective, the fixers would have needed to create more havoc. In the December 7 elections, the opposition won more seats in parliament. That majority in parliament would have been consequentially cancelled and realigned in favour of the ruling party, so that a hostile parliament does not badger the President, once in office. That is the ideology of the political fixers in Nigeria. They are purveyors of arbitrariness and manipulators of the will of the electorate. Political fixers have done far more incalculable harm to our country than we even acknowledge. In truth, elections in Nigeria do not represent voter preferences. Instead, it is the will of a cabal of fixers that is often imposed on the people; and the country's present standing is proof enough of the counter-productive effect of the far-reaching menace of political fixers. But, of course, in a country where anything goes, political fixers, the real kingpins of election robbers, are feted and courted for their subversive capacity. It should be interesting to read the opinions, by way of interviews, of some of Nigeria's well-known political fixers on the Ghanaian poll and what lessons it holds for Nigeria. Unless and until we recognize, and deal decisively with political fixers, as formidable enemies of Nigeria's democracy, we are bound to endure the woes of frustrated hopes, such as happened with the April 2007 general elections.

The fixers could not have had a job in Ghana, because the system is intolerant of their ilk. And the evidence shows in the outcome of the presidential run-off elections. It is amazing to most Nigerians, who are so used to the capricious manipulation of election results, that an opposition candidate has performed such a feat in Ghana. The statistics of the run-off are interesting. Unlike the first round of voting, Atta-Mills of the NDC scored 4,521,032 or 50.23 per cent, while Akufo-Addo of the ruling NPP scored 4,480,446 (i.e. 49.77 per cent). Atta-Mills had a better national spread of votes, winning more than 50 per cent in eight of the country's 10 regions. It was only in the Ashanti and Eastern Regions that Akufo-Addo scored more than 50 per cent.

It is fairly easy to predict that chaos would have been the natural consequence if political fixers subverted the wishes of Ghanaian voters. To show how enthusiastic Ghanaians were about the elections, the percentage turnout of voters in the first ballot on December 7 was 69.52 per cent. In the run-off, the voter turnout hit a high mark of 72.9 per cent. Interestingly, whereas invalid votes by way of rejected votes were 2.4 per cent of the votes cast on December 7, that figure came down dramatically to only 1(one) per cent of the votes cast in the run-off, with the Upper West region recording the highest invalid votes of 2.1 per cent. Now, these and related statistics are useful for analyses, because the figures are genuine. Can we say the same of the election figures that are so whimsically concocted and awarded by political fixers and their confederates in INEC?

Nigerians are generally enamoured of good examples, especially when such examples are from outside our shores. But because of our impatience, we often pay scant attention to the creative processes that produced the good examples we readily cite. Ghana has now conducted its fifth successive general elections since 1992, with a high approval rating from observers and participants alike. Yet, it has taken that country and its relevant institutions a lot of hard work, harsh lessons from mistakes, and unflinching determination for consistent improvement. Ghana's 1992 presidential and parliamentary elections were undermined by disputes over ballot-stuffing and result manipulation. By 1995, the country's electoral commission undertook the compilation of a credible voters register. In our case, Nigerians will recall that in 2006 when INEC embarked on a new voter registration exercise, data-capturing machines were found in the private residence of the then henchman of Ibadan politics, Alhaji Lamidi Adedibu, even though his house was not a registration centre.

Ghana's electoral commission also embarked on a number of other confidence-building measures. The commission has put to good use a crucial feature of Option A4, whereby vote counting and declaration of authenticated results take place at voting centres and are then collated upwards, with a tracker for integrity. In 1996, the electoral commission introduced the use of transparent ballot boxes. In the same year, political parties were represented at the printing houses where the ballot papers for the general elections were printed. Can we see how Ghana has left us behind? In the April 2007 elections, INEC was running from pillar to post, at home and more especially abroad, to print ballot papers that were not even serialized and therefore prone to use for fraud. So embarrassing was INEC's performance, it is alleged that some of the ballot papers for the presidential election of April 21, 2007 arrived after voting - by which time the fixers had secured victory for the ruling People's Democratic Party.



Ghana certainly did well managing the aftermath of the elections but the same Ghanaian 2008 election scenario in Nigeria being more complex may altogether be different because the courts will be the decider in Nigeria.

Danmeka
Jan 8, 2009, 02:08 PM
Prof Aluko, reading your articles have been very educative and interesting to read,I hope we can learn from this. I believe Jerry Rawlings coming to power played an important role in Ghana.As for Nigeria, still a basket case, we have a leader who care about his pocket,the Senate and House of Reps who should be asking questions about the wherabout of our external reserves and what happen to the excess we made when oil prices were high last year. We all know the answer.

charles4u
Jan 8, 2009, 05:13 PM
Prof Aluko, reading your articles have been very educative and interesting to read,I hope we can learn from this. I believe Jerry Rawlings coming to power played an important role in Ghana.As for Nigeria, still a basket case, we have a leader who care about his pocket,the Senate and House of Reps who should be asking questions about the wherabout of our external reserves and what happen to the excess we made when oil prices were high last year. We all know the answer.

The money dey private investments and their bank accounts for abroad..dem use am for our second private reserve. :D

I dont even know what to write...cus its just a hopeless situation.

lumumba
Jan 8, 2009, 07:39 PM
[quote=lumumba;310041][quote=Onari;310012]

Lumumba,

I think we have a common objective here and it issimple, Let us do things properly at least on this we agree, which you have confirmed by talking about proper Yoruba did not support OBJ, this can also be translated to say that proper Nigerians do not support corruption. Displaying or not displaying wealth is not only in the West, it applies to every region. Also if development can be achieved in socio-cutural conditions, then me and you will not be in a foreign land and be at the top our profession.



We are in these foreign lands because of underdevelopment brought about by eradication of our socio-cultural values and replaced with "nothing." The foreign land we are in has its own socio-cultural values which we either subscribe to or at least conform with. The foreign lands we are in, largely Europe/America gave us the Nation state. There is no need to speculate on what would have happened had Europe not intervened when it did. So, how did the European Nation state emerge and develop? And how is it being consolidated? If we accept what they gave us, should we not be concerned if we are following a different process from theirs?