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Ishola Taiwo
Jan 6, 2009, 02:25 PM
THE BASICS DEBATES

Invitation to Villagers to participate in an exchange of views on implementable ideas within the Nigerian environment.

Subjects to be covered will include:


Agriculture
Civic Organisation
Education
Energy
Finance
Health
Industry
Infrastructure
Security
Transportation

Any other suggested topics.


As it has often been said that one of the problems we face in the current political dispensation is a lack of clearly articulated motivational ideologies from the main political parties, I will suggest that participants in this discussion adopt a platform approach. That is to say, each submission should be presented as if it were part of a manifesto.

If our political parties will not do it, let us here have structured discussions about these important subjects.

Let us also try to present our ideas in ways that will enable the adoption and dissemination of the best to a wider audience.

2011 fast approaches....

molue
Jan 6, 2009, 09:26 PM
Excellent! May i suggest that we need "tough" moderators on all subjects for example, one moderator can cover 3 subjects.

I am interested and willing to participate on the above, 2011 can come soon enough.

Many thanks Eja.

Molue

Veros
Jan 7, 2009, 12:13 AM
Eja nice suggestion. But to submit manifestoes that will cover all the above subjects will need a lot of energy, research and time. I suggest we cut it down or group them into sections or even sub-sections. I look forward to submissions.

katampe
Jan 7, 2009, 12:52 AM
I love the idea , Eja.

But I think it would not be a bad either, since you talked about structure to present suggestions it in a policy proposal format. And in ways that people can jointly work together and chip in, so we can have ideas from a vast array of perspectives and save time and energy when compared to one person coming up with the whole ideas.

The structured format is good so people can contribute what they know best under the sections in the prescribed format.I guess what we need to do is establish general guidelines for the format using timeless principles on how best to solve problems.

It is easy to glean insight from best practices from countries around the world. And getting these perspectives becomes easier when we consider that contributors are spread across the world.

I would suggest we include housing, economic, immigration, urban and city development. Equally, we might start of identifying priority issues that affect the country and how we can go about solving these issues.




THE BASICS DEBATES

Invitation to Villagers to participate in an exchange of views on implementable ideas within the Nigerian environment.

Subjects to be covered will include:


Agriculture
Civic Organisation
Education
Energy
Finance
Health
Industry
Infrastructure
Security
Transportation
Any other suggested topics.


As it has often been said that one of the problems we face in the current political dispensation is a lack of clearly articulated motivational ideologies from the main political parties, I will suggest that participants in this discussion adopt a platform approach. That is to say, each submission should be presented as if it were part of a manifesto.

If our political parties will not do it, let us here have structured discussions about these important subjects.

Let us also try to present our ideas in ways that will enable the adoption and dissemination of the best to a wider audience.

2011 fast approaches....

Ishola Taiwo
Jan 8, 2009, 01:08 PM
Thanks for all the responses and suggestions.

Veros, the grouping is a good idea especially as several of the mentioned topics actually interlink.

Molue, each group can then have one moderator. I see the moderator as being one who has a most vital role to play in this. The types of summing up that was done by moderators in previous debates will have a great influence on the policy proposal that will be the end result of each debate (thanks Katampe).

An updated list of topics now follows:


Agriculture
Civic Organisation
Economics
Education
Energy
Finance
Health
Housing
Immigration
Industry
Infrastructure
Security
Transportation
Urban and City Development


A proposed grouping of the above:

ONE

Health
Housing
Education
Transportation
Urban and City Development

TWO

Agriculture
Energy
Industry

THREE

Economics
Finance

FOUR

Civic Organisation
Immigration
Security

You will note that I have removed Infrastructure from the grouped lists. This is because I feel that the topics in Groups ONE and TWO already deal with that subject.

Without a doubt, this will be time-consuming, but I feel that the end result will make the efforts worthwhile.

denker
Jan 12, 2009, 12:58 PM
Eja, i do not wanna believe dat you wanna reinvent a wheel....tell us first wetin no correct for the system wey we dey practice now....na after dat me i go reconsider joining..lol!

Enforcer
Jan 12, 2009, 09:22 PM
Eja, i do not wanna believe dat you wanna reinvent a wheel....tell us first wetin no correct for the system wey we dey practice now....na after dat me i go reconsider joining..lol!

denker

No, my German-Nigerian friend. You tell us why you believe there is nothing wrong with the current system, giving five specific examples on each heading in each group.

I believe that is fairer. Don't you think?

Marin
Jan 12, 2009, 09:30 PM
I would like to register my interest in taking part in the discussions/debates...

charles4u
Jan 12, 2009, 09:34 PM
I would like to register my interest in taking part in the discussions/debates...

I believe you can contribute and register.

Its a good discussion and every idea is good to share.

But I dont really understand what the outcome will be ....and how the grouping thing, people here to choose one of the groups then what ?

denker
Jan 12, 2009, 10:03 PM
denker

No, my German-Nigerian friend. You tell us why you believe there is nothing wrong with the current system, giving five specific examples on each heading in each group.

I believe that is fairer. Don't you think?

Enforcer, oldboy, i no sabi o...abeg, do tell wat is wrong with the current system, giving five specific examples on each heading in each group....:p:D

charles4u
Jan 12, 2009, 10:09 PM
... Which one be this testing one another to comfirm if he or she is qualify or so, the discussion is debate and contribution and already guys don dey throw questions to each other.

....Na wa oo

valteena
Jan 12, 2009, 10:14 PM
It is definitely a great idea to put our house in order but we should not loose sight of the fact we are not an island unto ourselves.

The world is a now a global village. We therefore need to redefine our terms of engagement with the rest of the world by formulating the right foreign policy agenda or trust to protect and further our national interest. I therefore suggest adding.

(1) Foreign policy
(2) Information

charles4u
Jan 12, 2009, 10:21 PM
It is definitely a great idea to put our house in order but we should not loose sight of the fact we are not an island unto ourselves.

The world is a now a global village. We therefore need to redefine our ters of engagement with the rest of the world by formulating right foreign policy agenda or trust to protect and further our national interest. I am therefore suggesting adding.

(1) Foreign policy
(2) Information


Valteenarita...I know say you be one guru..PhD ..LOL:D

See as you talk am...:kiss:

Ishola Taiwo
Jan 13, 2009, 02:51 PM
Since one constant question that is often thrown at critics of the system is "What would you do?", this exercise gives us an opportunity to state in a focused manner what ideas we do possess. In short, the purpose is to go beyond the current practice of scatter-gun criticism and, to provide instead alternative policies (where necessary) for specific/defined fields.

Latest revised grouping follows below. Due to the necessity of moving past this initial phase, please note that any further additions may only be placed as a subject under one of the topics already listed. An example of this can be found in Group ONE (where subjects "Housing" and "Transportation" have been placed under "Urban and City Development").

ONE
1. Health Care
2. Urban and City Development

Housing
Transportation

3. Education

TWO
1. Agriculture
2. Energy
3. Industry

THREE
1. Economics
2. Finance

FOUR
1. Civic Organisation
2. Foreign Policy
3. Immigration
4. Information
5. Security

Participants may select one or several groups to contribute to. The purpose is not necessarily to "re-invent the wheel" as, for example, if it is my opinion that a good agricultural policy has already being implemented by current stakeholders, then my contribution to that subject may simply be one where I speak on the infrastructures and practices that make up that good policy. Then, I might also make suggestions on how these can be improved or, select aspects of the policy that can be exported and adapted to some of the other fields under discussion.

I wish to emphasise again that the point of this exercise is to provide (in our little way), something that has been missing from current political discourse in Nigeria: The purpose is to re-introduce the concept of the policy-driven manifesto (i.e. a proposed programme of action that can be easily disseminated).

To this end, the amount of detail that we will provide is totally down to how much effort we wish to expend.

You never know, at the end of this, we may have been inspired enough to provide usable nuggets of information that can be picked up and utilised by ones who wish to participate in the mainstream of the ongoing Nigerian political process.

The next stage now is to list the participants. So far we have Eja, Molue, Veros, Katampe, Marin and Valteena having explicitly expressed an interest. All others who wish to contribute as participants in the Main Debate should now state their intention.

Participants will be required to identify the Group(s) they wish to debate about. We will also need volunteers for the role(s) of Moderator. I said role(s) because we might require more than one Moderator (i.e. one Moderator per 2 groups will equal 2 Moderators).

I suggest that we close this stage by midnight Friday and then proceed onto the presentation of arguments phase.

Ishola Taiwo
Jan 13, 2009, 02:54 PM
I will like to present ideas on subjects listed under Group FOUR. However, I may also respond to any other subjects/groups if and when I deem it necessary to do so.

charles4u
Jan 13, 2009, 03:05 PM
....Were better thing dey to maybe help the situation in Nigeria me go dey oooo, I hereby surrender myself for this debate for number 3 (THREE 1. Economics 2. Finance).

....I will like to know if on what ground does this debate stand on, those that should be focused on first or which one is more better that will help the economy at this stage or just some kinda contribution to know how we can contribute our ideas base on the ground of what we chose.

....Make una brief me small oo b4 we proceed and why dont we have governmental issues there ?

Ishola Taiwo
Jan 13, 2009, 03:12 PM
....I will like to know if on what ground does this debate stand on, those that should be focused on first or which one is more better that will help the economy at this stage or just some kinda contribution to know how we can contribute our ideas base on the ground of what we chose.

....Make una brief me small oo b4 we proceed and why dont we have governmantal issues there cus thats why me choose 3 for economy.

Charles4u, the answer to the question is the bolded part. If we all contribute ideas based on the grounds of what we choose, we will hopefully cover all areas.

As far as governmental issues go, I think that most of the subjects chosen so far can be described as governmental issues. Just that instead of simply talking about "government" as an all-encompassing topic, we have broken it down to component level.

charles4u
Jan 13, 2009, 03:20 PM
Charles4u, the answer to the question is the bolded part. If we all contribute ideas based on the grounds of what we choose, we will hopefully cover all areas.

As far as governmental issues go, I think that most of the subjects chosen so far can be described as governmental issues. Just that instead of simply talking about "government" as an all-encompassing topic, we have broken it down to component level.

....OK then am in for the debate representing number 3 (THREE = 1. Economics 2. Finance).

....Where is the debate gonna take place, here or ?

Ishola Taiwo
Jan 13, 2009, 03:29 PM
....Where is the debate gonna take place, here or ?

It will take place here in The Crucible.

charles4u
Jan 13, 2009, 03:47 PM
It will take place here in The Crucible.

....OK, so under this same room (The "Basics" Debates) or a new different room ?

....Kindly give the guidelines on how the debate should be presented also with how the presentations should be followed if any.

I just want things to be accurate with no contradictions, to be smooth and pointful.

Ishola Taiwo
Jan 13, 2009, 04:09 PM
....OK, so under this same room (The "Basics" Debates) or a new different room ?

....Kindly give the guidelines on how the debate should be presented also with how the presentations should be followed if any.

I just want things to be accurate with no contradictions, to be smooth and pointful.

Good query Charles4u.

We will be following the usual Crucible Procedure (http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/forum/crucible/15698-welcome-crucible.html).

There will be main debate threads (4 all together) where participants who have indicated an interest will present contrasting views. There will also be Parallel threads where supporters of each point-of-view can share their thoughts.

These are only proposals mind you, other ideas on how to proceed are welcome. By the morning of Saturday (the 18th), we should know for sure how we will be going.

charles4u
Jan 13, 2009, 04:58 PM
...OK, so atleast if people come here and read the posts...they will know how and what to expect b4 or on saturday the main debate day.

....Is there anything else we need to know b4 saturday or what to expect on saturday so as so not to miss something(s).

Enforcer
Jan 13, 2009, 08:20 PM
Latest revised grouping follows below.

ONE
1. Health Care
2. Urban and City Development

Housing
Transportation

3. Education

TWO
1. Agriculture
2. Energy
3. Industry

THREE
1. Economics
2. Finance

FOUR
1. Civic Organisation
2. Foreign Policy
3. Immigration
4. Information
5. Security



Eja,

All the subjects in group 1 to 4 appeal to me, particularly health care, industry, economics, finance, foreign policy, information and security. If I have to limit myself for any reason I will devote more time to group 3.

I am ready.

Multioption
Jan 13, 2009, 08:50 PM
Eja,

Thanks a heap for creating this thread.

The only problem I see confronting Nigeria is not lack of ideas on how to move the nation forward, but unwillingness of the citizenry to do the right thing. The value system in our not so great country is non-existent.

Let me give you an instance:

A family friend told me a story about one of his in-laws who visited his family some months ago. It so happened that the guy took the in-law (a lady) out for shopping, and the following conversation ensued:

In-law: "na wa o, everybody drives nice cars in this country"

Friend: "Oh yes, that's America for you. Hardworking Americans live comfortably"

In-law: "Well, I can't live here"

Friend: "Why?"

In-law: "Nobody will respect me here"

My friend was rather puzzled, so he asked:

Friend: "What do you mean by that?"

In-law: "A country where you can't tell the difference between the rich and the poor; how do you know who is who?

At that juncture, my friend went on hibernation for the rest of the day. He did not mince words telling his wife that her cousin (the visiting in law) had overstayed her welcome.

The scenario above aptly captures the mindset of the average Nigerian. Both the rich and the poor have a terrible proclivity for adulation, hence Nigerians' unbridled desire for material acquisition!

So, corruption fueled by perverted value system is the root of all our problems. Something is wrong with the psyche of the average Nigerian, especially those who have never stepped outside the shores of the country.

The only antidote to our problem is to find a way to ENFORCE the law and due process.

Nigeria is a lawless country!

Will copy and post an article written by a Chicago based Nigerian!

Multioption
Jan 13, 2009, 08:53 PM
Source (http://nigeriaworld.com/feature/publication/fabiyi/102808.html)
Malcolm E. Fabiyi, PhD Tuesday, October 28, 2008

mef22@yahoo.com
Chicago, IL, USA

A RATIONAL DECISIONS THEORY EXPLANATION FOR WHY CORRUPTION THRIVES IN NIGERIA

Rational Decision Theory is a standard approach used by economists and other social scientists to explain why individuals make the decisions that they do. The field of decision theory has spawned several Nobel Laureates, and a healthy body of experience has developed to support its fundamental premise. The behavior of stockholders, economic cycles of boom and bust, criminal behavior, and a host of other behaviors have been explained by this theory. In this article, I apply simple rational decision theoretic rules to explain why corruption thrives in Nigeria. I also apply the theory to identify some critical areas where public policy efforts should be focused if corruption is to be tamed.

At its core, decision theory is based on simple and intuitive concepts. It assumes fundamentally that given an option, W, which has a likelihood or probability of occurrence, P, the expected benefit from taking that choice is given by the multiplication of the option, W and the probability P. In simple mathematical terms, we would say that:

Expected Benefit = W x P.

Of course any choice options naturally carry corresponding costs. Therefore, given a Cost, C with a probability of occurrence P', the expected cost of the option is given as:

Expected Cost = C x P'.

In effect, the expected net benefit of any option W given a cost C and respective probabilities of occurrence P, and P' is given as:

Expected Net Benefit = Expected Benefit - Expected Cost = W x P - C x P'.

Whenever the Expected Net Benefits are greater than zero, the choice is one which a rational decision maker is expected to make. If the Expected Net Benefits are negative, the rational thing to do is to turn down the option. Now that we have a decent handle on rational decision theory we will apply the concept to two hypothetical corruption cases.

A 45 year old Director General in the Nigerian Civil Service earns N8m annually (including allowances, rent and home ownership subsidies and other emoluments). He has the opportunity to corruptly enrich himself to the tune of N10 m. If caught, he will suffer reputational damage for the rest of his life, spend some time in jail and lose his pension entitlements. He estimates that the losses he will suffer if caught and prosecuted will come to about N5 m annually. These losses can be calculated as a perpetuity, which at an assumed 10% interest rate gives estimated lifetime losses of about N50 m. He knows that there is a 10% chance that he will be caught, and if caught, there is a further 10% chance that he will be prosecuted. He expects that he will be found guilty if prosecuted. Should he corruptly enrich himself?

Answer: Yes. The Expected Net Benefit is positive (+N9.5 m).

Probability of getting embezzled amount (P1)= 100%

Probability of getting caught (P2) = 10%

Probability of getting prosecuted (P3) = 10%

Probability of being found guilty if prosecuted (P4) = 100%

Estimated Lifetime Losses (C) = N50m

Gains from Corrupt enrichment (W) = N10m

Expected Net Benefit = P1 x W - P2 x P3 x P4 x C

Expected Net Benefit = 100% x 10 m - 10% x 10% x 100% x 50 m = 10 - 0.5 = N9.5m.

Case 2: High Enforcement Regime

Consider the case of the same civil servant. Assume that now the enforcement and judicial environment is radically different. The government has instituted a policy that rewards whistleblowers who report corrupt officials with 2.5% of the total embezzled amount. There is also a 2.5% bonus reward that goes to the lawyers who prosecute the cases if there is a successful conviction. These developments have caused the probability of getting caught to increase to 50% and the probability of getting prosecuted to increase to 50%. Should the Civil Servant still corruptly enrich himself in this new scenario?

Answer: No. The Expected Net Benefit is negative (-N2.5 m).

Probability of getting embezzled amount (P1)= 100%

Probability of getting caught (P2) = 50%

Probability of getting prosecuted (P3) = 50%

Probability of being found guilty if prosecuted (P4) = 100%

Estimated Lifetime Losses (C) = N50 m

Gains from Corrupt enrichment (W) = N10 m
Expected Net Benefit = P1 x W - P2 x P3 x P4 x C

Expected Net Benefit = 100% x 10 - 50% x 50% x 100% x 50 m = 10 - 12.5 = -N2.5 m.

Drawings Public Policy Lessons from Rational Decision Theory

While these examples are hypothetical, the implications are clear. The self interest of people and the proven rational basis for much of human behavior can actually be used as tools for cracking down on corruption. Rational decision theory suggests that if corruption is to be tackled effectively public policy must focus on (i) increasing the likelihood of getting caught, (ii) increasing the likelihood of prosecution and (iii) raising the penalties borne by corrupt officials.

(i) Encourage whistleblowers so that the likelihood of catching embezzlers increases: There is always a long line of clerks, messengers, cashiers, accountants, personal bankers and auditors that are privy to every single act of corruption. Right now, these people keep quiet because there is no incentive to make them come forward with the information that they have. Imagine what would happen if a law was enacted that guaranteed a reward of 2.5% of the recovered proceeds of corruption to a whistleblower (the payout should probably be capped at N10m or so, otherwise the incentives become perverse). I am confident that the authorities would be inundated with all types of information about corrupt activities. As a consequence the likelihood that corrupt officials will be reported should increase, thereby increasing the costs to the perpetrators of corrupt activities.

(ii) Provide Incentives to Lawyers so that the likelihood of prosecution increases: Even where corrupt officials are arrested, we have seen situations where trials drag on forever, or the officials are let off the hook because of the ineptitude and sloppiness of the lawyers charged with their prosecution. To get prosecution rates up, it will be prudent to provide an incentive that rewards the successful and timely prosecution of cases. Guaranteeing some portion of the recovered sums to successful prosecutors could help in this regard. In the corporate world, where shareholders are faced with what is called the Principal-Agent problem, the commitment of the CEO and other executives to making sure that their (the executives') focus is on growing shareholder's wealth is secured by making stock options part of the compensation package. If the stock does well, then the executives benefit as well.

(iii) Increase the penalties associated with corruption: As the cases suggest, a critical element that determines the expected net benefit (or loss) of corruption is the magnitude of the lifetime loss suffered. In all the instances considered, if the lifetime losses had been more extreme, the expected net benefits of corrupt activity would have greatly reduced. Some of the steps that could be taken from a public policy perspective to increase the costs to the perpetrators of corrupt activities includes severely restricting the economic opportunities available to people convicted of corruption. For instance professionals like lawyers, doctors, and engineers who have been convicted of corruption could be stripped of their charters and/or licenses. Convicted embezzlers could be excluded from participation in the stock market, or politics, and onerous forfeiture requirements could be imposed to make the lifetime losses large and significant.

Dr Fabiyi is a former President of the University of Lagos Students' Union (ULSU).

valteena
Jan 13, 2009, 08:59 PM
ONE
1. Health Care
2. Urban and City Development

Housing
Transportation

3. Education

TWO
1. Agriculture
2. Energy
3. Industry

THREE
1. Economics
2. Finance

FOUR
1. Civic Organisation
2. Foreign Policy
3. Immigration
4. Information
5. Security




I am cool with 1 & 4 and will settle for 4 if we are restricted to just one group

molue
Jan 13, 2009, 10:43 PM
I am in for 2 & 4 but, will be snooping on the remaining groups... Are we allow to switch?

Molue

charles4u
Jan 13, 2009, 11:51 PM
I am in for 2 & 4 but, will be snooping on the remaining groups... Are we allow to switch?

Molue

....Switch bawo ?.....you cant switch if you are assigned to a group, so its better you choose and know were you belong now oo.

... And also we should only be allowed to belong in just 1 group out of the 4 groups.

nero africanus
Jan 14, 2009, 06:36 PM
this is a good idea eja ,

i can participate on all the topics from a systems thinking point of view

Ishola Taiwo
Jan 16, 2009, 08:27 AM
Thanks to all respondents.

With regards to the groups and which one a person belongs to, there is no restriction to the number of groups one participates in.

I would suggest however (for the purposes of time management) that each person pick only one Group as their main debate.

Remember that each debate will normally have two people offering contrasting views and, any number of supporters/dissenters in the parallel threads.

This means (for example) that Molue could be one of the two debaters going over items in Group 4 on the main debate thread while also contributing on the parallel thread to the debates over items being covered in Groups 1 to 3.

Also, we still need 2 volunteer Moderators.

Marin
Jan 16, 2009, 08:38 AM
Eja,

Thanks a heap for creating this thread.

The only problem I see confronting Nigeria is not lack of ideas on how to move the nation forward, but unwillingness of the citizenry to do the right thing. The value system in our not so great country is non-existent.

Let me give you an instance:

A family friend told me a story about one of his in-laws who visited his family some months ago. It so happened that the guy took the in-law (a lady) out for shopping, and the following conversation ensued:

In-law: "na wa o, everybody drives nice cars in this country"

Friend: "Oh yes, that's America for you. Hardworking Americans live comfortably"

In-law: "Well, I can't live here"

Friend: "Why?"

In-law: "Nobody will respect me here"

My friend was rather puzzled, so he asked:

Friend: "What do you mean by that?"

In-law: "A country where you can't tell the difference between the rich and the poor; how do you know who is who?

At that juncture, my friend went on hibernation for the rest of the day. He did not mince words telling his wife that her cousin (the visiting in law) had overstayed her welcome.

The scenario above aptly captures the mindset of the average Nigerian. Both the rich and the poor have a terrible proclivity for adulation, hence Nigerians' unbridled desire for material acquisition!

So, corruption fueled by perverted value system is the root of all our problems. Something is wrong with the psyche of the average Nigerian, especially those who have never stepped outside the shores of the country.

The only antidote to our problem is to find a way to ENFORCE the law and due process.

Nigeria is a lawless country!

Will copy and post an article written by a Chicago based Nigerian!


The highlighted part of you post reminds me of a book I was reading, where an English aristocrat in the 19th century expressed his disaproval of a plan for the mass production of soap arguing that if soap was available to every woman, how would one be able to tell a lady apart from a working class woman.

charles4u
Jan 16, 2009, 01:10 PM
....Am sorry to say this but shouldnt we just belong to one group and then debate on it with the other groups instead of being in 2 groups were there will be complications.

....being in one group will make it easier and we will all know were to stand, who is who and what he or she is representing. Lastly...there will be chance for others to participate just incase they want to instead of filling up the space with just one or two guys. (it will become a lecture not a debate).

Ishola Taiwo
Jan 22, 2009, 01:59 PM
We have no members volunteering to moderate yet. No matter, we can still carry on meanwhile. Can four from those who wish to participate each please start up a thread under the one of the following headings :


Urban and City Development
Agriculture, Energy and Industry
Economics and Finance
Civic Organisation and Foreign Policy


The subjects remain the same as when we had Groups ONE to FOUR. Just that for clarity, I have selected the headings used above.

nero africanus
Jan 22, 2009, 04:49 PM
Agriculture , energy and industry


agriculture
The ability to feed itself has always formed the bulwark of human endeavour from the earliest times. For this reason it must be given priority.
I am of the opinion that the government should pay an active regulatory role in the agricultural productivity of any nation.

The reasons for this is this
The farmers needs to be protected from the vagaries of the market
The govt needs to ensure that a minimum required to feed the people is produced
Nigeria can solve the agricultural problem one and for all by capitalising a food and agricultural bank with sufficient finance to fix the price of food produce.
This can be done with the price of cassava being fixed per tonne, this would be the price that the food and agricultural bank will purchase cassava that the farmers produce in this way the farmers are insulated from falling prices and consumers are insulated from rising prices. The FAO will also ensure that Nigeria produces 5 million tonnes of cassava a year at least. This quantity of cassava is what we require to feed Nigerians for a year. . To ensure that this target is met, the FAO will sign contracts with small companies who will go ahead to operate cassava plantations whose produce will be sold to the FAO. In this manner the nation ensures that it produces at least 5million tonnes of cassava. This will be extended to other food produce.

If we succeed in doing this for every food produce Nigeria will once again become a food exporting nation, it will mop up unemployment as there will be a significant amount of labour required in producing 50 million tonnes of food. We shall establish plantations for cash crops which will be run on the same model as that for food crops, the processing of oil palm and cocoa takes up a significant amount of labour.
Energy
The government owes the citizens a duty to provide them with jobs. for this reason; it must ensure there is enough power to drive industrial processes,
In the case of Nigeria, it is essential that power is decentralised and left for local companies to run. However it is necessarily that the government provides power substations in every state, as soon as this power stations are up and running, they are sold in an IPO on the stock market. This model is necessary to prevent the PHCN debacle. This model will have the nation building a power generating station in every state of at least 150MW or 40 watts per person in the state whichever is higher. This will enable factories to function. With this kind of decentralised power generation, economic competition and rivalry will ensure as some power companies will perform while others will not. It is important that after the resource mobilisation that control of these companies is transferred to the private sector. In the short term, it is necessary to deploy bio fuel /fossil fired power stations while other sources of energy like hydro which takes time to build is implemented.

The beauty of this model that whatever the state spends on deploying these systems it will get it back once it is sold and this can happen within 6 months, the government also needs to privatise the national grid, but not before huge cash injections to fix distribution short falls in terms of overloaded transformers, faulty transformers and news areas of human settlement. As soon as this is done and an effective grid is up and running the grid should be sold to private investors where the owners of the national grid will charge the power generators a premium to distribute their power to the consumer. In this way the government assumes the traditional role of regulation. It can also maintain a minority stake as a source of revenue for the state.

Industry,

I am a firm believer in management by objective, for this reason, the Nigerian state should set a target for itself to create 35 million new jobs in the country. It must be said at this point that if Nigeria grows enough food to feed itself, a large part of this target will already be met. Nigeria can create new jobs by control of importation. It can create a national industrial development board. This board will determine what we can realistically produce and award contracts to bidding companies to produce these things. Importation will be restricted to public companies that are held accountable for imports. As soon as the production companies produce toothpicks for instance, it will be transferred to the company in charge of the importation of that product. The whole idea is that at any point the company in charge of importation should be in a position to buy and distribute what is produced locally, no matter the quantity, at any point that is it not able to pay for the local produce and subsequent distribution then it is time for the foreign importation of the particular product to end.

In this manner, the NIDB will contract production at a fixed price out to companies and transfer the finished products to the importers to sell. In this way, foreign goods will be gradually phased out, while the risk of the producers is born by the importers.

As long as we continue this manner of import substitution there will be an increased industrial activity as high as the production contracts that the NIDB is able to sign with producers.

The whole underlying point is that Nigeria has been left to the market since the Abacha years but the market as refused to function or indeed allocate resources, the Nigerian state will create a frame work that reduces the risk inherent in the system which only it can. At some point , Nigeria will contract away all that is imported today and a new age will be ushered in a Nigeria in need of immigrants.

charles4u
Jan 24, 2009, 02:40 PM
Economics and Finance

Economics:

Economics aims to explain how economies work and how economic agents interact. Economic analysis is applied throughout society, in business and finance, education, health, law, politics, social institutions. An economy is the business of one place to another, Activities related to the production and distribution of goods and services in a particular geographic region (In this case Nigeria).

Here are the things involved in a perfect and growing economy:

1. The government prints notes at a regular rate and maintain a balance sustainable annual budget with a positive use (If no corruption).
2. The government (If no corruption) create infrastructures which will lead to development and increase in employment.
3. People put their money into shops and businesses, by playing the stock market.
4. The infrastructures and growing businesses make more jobs, and that makes a better employment rate in the region or country.


Here are the things involved in a bad economy:

1. The government prints too much money with increase in annual budget without economy growth, which means interest rates and inflation will go up. Those rates go up because money won't have as much value anymore when there's too many Naira bills around. For example, if everyone had 10,000 Notes, no one would care about having 200 Notes anymore -- they wouldn't be worth much and prices will increase.
2. Because of vast amount in budget with corruption and no positive impact in the economy, fewer companies would be able to manage the economic ups and downs. They would have to shut down, which would mean fewer jobs.
3. More people would be poor or even homeless, and fewer people would have money to buy things and play the stock market.
4. Thus, more companies would shut down and employment rates would drop.


An economy is a lot like the enviroment, Everything depends on each other. That is why economies country like China goes high, because more people are bringing and creating businesses there, and more jobs and more money is coming to their market which is leading to a constant and systainable growth in their economy.


Finance:

finance refers to the concepts of time, money and risk and how they are interrelated. Banks are the main facilitators of funding through the provision of credit, although private equity, mutual funds, hedge funds, and other organizations have become important. Finance is used by individuals (personal finance), by governments (public finance), by businesses (corporate finance), as well as by a wide variety of organizations including schools and non-profit organizations.

In this case I will choose from public finance (government), The proper role of government provides a starting point for the analysis of public finance. In theory, Sponsoring/Assisting/Supporting/Contributing to the private and public sectors or markets. But in a case were there is no assistance or support from the government then there wont be increase in growth for the private sectors or market.

The case of Nigeria is related to poor financial system and a high rate of corruption, Good governance is an essential part of a framework for economic and financial management which also includes: macroeconomic stability; commitment to social and economic equity; and the promotion of efficient institutions through structural reforms such as trade liberalization and domestic deregulation.
Poor governance may result from factors such as incompetence, ignorance, lack of efficient institutions, the pursuit of economically inefficient ideologies, or misguided economic models.

NOTE : Poor governance often leads to corruption and corruption is an important element of poor governance.

Corrupt public officials abuse their public power to extort bribes from the private agents. In both types of interaction with the public sector, the private agents are bound to face uncertainty with respect to their disposable incomes. Most importantly, the increase in corruption via higher uncertainty exerts adverse effects on capital accumulation, thus leading to lower growth rates.

In a country were there is no transparency in governance and a high rate of corruption, surely the economy and the financial system will deteriorate..if not collapse. A better country needs a better government and a better government needs a better positive people to handle it which will lead to a positively growing economy with a strong financial system that will sustain the country in all aspect of development.

Thank you.

Toku.A
Jan 30, 2009, 04:42 PM
What do we hope to achieve thru this debate. Are we writing the NVS party manifesto, or we are helping out a future 'honorable'

Ishola Taiwo
Nov 22, 2009, 01:11 PM
CIVIC ORGANISATION AND FOREIGN POLICY

STRUCTURAL REORGANISATION
Part 1

At this moment in time, the most cost-effective way of bringing progressive change to Nigeria (in terms of human life and treasure) is through constitutional change. It is a daunting process but, it need not be so; especially not if we remove the unmerited awe from what is after all, nothing more than a document-based version of what we do when we change Presidents and regimes.

Currently, public attention is focused on the unsatisfactory aspects of the Obasanjo and YarAdua Presidencies and, much brain-power has been expended on devising various stratagems that will compel YarAdua to do what is necessary. All good, but what we must do in addition to demanding the best effort from whoever occupies the seat of leadership is look for ways to fix the flaws in the system that enable (and in some cases compel) the existence of dysfunctional regimes.

So how should the presidency be changed?

First, the idea of multiple political parties should be done away with. This idea, like all others, was devised by men and women like ourselves for the purpose of organising/aligning their societies along beneficial paths. In other words, there is nothing natural (and therefore essential at a fundamental level of human existence) about the idea of multi-party democracy.

Knowing therefore that like all other ideas, this one was devised by ones who had assessed their own specific local conditions and, having assessed the unique local conditions in Nigeria, my observation is that allowing different political parties to exist in a society that has no common theme uniting all regions and sectors will merely exacerbate the overwhelming awareness of differences that already exists.

Therefore, all Nigerians who are interested in political participation should have only one choice when it comes to "party" membership. This will compel a type of unity that is not merely abstract but, that has an everyday practical effect.

Membership of this single national "party" should be open at inception to all adult Nigerians though in time, there will be a process that incoming members have to go through before been admitted as members. I will expand on some ideas regarding this process at a later date.

All opposition politics should take place within the "party" and elections based on national suffrage will serve as the process through which voters select what band of articulated policies they find best suited to the times.

The National Chief Executive should be elected directly (and in the most transparent way possible). And once the votes are counted, the incoming Chief Executive and members of the new Councils of State should take office within a week. Some objections to this suggestion will be based on the fear that such a rapid handing over will not allow the new government enough time to assign people to offices but, there is no reason why such assignations should not be made before the election - no reason why the incoming Chief Executive should not have considered the best candidates for each role long before he/she takes office.

Making such officials known long before they take office would also create a situation whereby Nigerians will have the opportunity to assess the suitability of prospective ministers through early exposure to their ideas. It will be expected that the subjects covered will range from alternative budgets to the monitoring of projects (underway and under proposal).

Beneficial consequences of this approach will include constructive criticism on the part of the "shadow minister".

The media shall be compelled by law to allow the "opposition" equal space to examine (and critique by proposing better alternatives if necessary) all policies and endeavors that are taken on behalf of the public.

Also, having become used to untangling the specific intellectual dilemma that are related to their field of responsibility, individual members of a new incoming government will be able to start performing as soon as they take their seats.


To be continued..

Ishola Taiwo
Nov 22, 2009, 01:13 PM
What do we hope to achieve thru this debate. Are we writing the NVS party manifesto, or we are helping out a future 'honorable'

Toku.A, if our efforts can help some "future honourable" to do the right thing, this would be good...abi you no gree?

Ishola Taiwo
Feb 15, 2010, 12:03 PM
CIVIC ORGANISATION AND FOREIGN POLICY

STRUCTURAL REORGANISATION
Part 2

Which will be about citizenship now and as it was, here and in some other places.


Many months ago on another NVS thread, I made mention of the fact that in many traditional societies, citizenship was not about where your ancestors came from but more about where you were born. So, long before the identities Nigerian (or even Yoruba) were manufactured, the normal practice was that if a person was born in Ekiti, he or she could lay claim to the nationality of the Ekiti town he/she had been born and brought up in (regardless of where his/her parents had come from).

There were no problems with doing this since it was generally accepted that at one time or another, every single person living in the town had come from somewhere else - that is to say, the histories that were told informed all that the populations of urban regions were formed out of successive waves of immigration.

All however integrated themselves into their new environments. In so doing, most also enriched those communities by introducing new components of culture and in time, these new components became indelible parts of the community's traditions. Examples of this can be seen in the many Yoruba communities whose cultural calendar includes displays by masquerades like the Igunnu (originally from Nupe land) and, Christian/Muslim festivals (all also originally from foreign sources).

Unfortunately for us all, due to the current mode of existence that has been adopted by the entity called Nigeria, this process of integration has in the main, ceased to operate. Therefore, nowadays in most parts of the geographical space, ethnicity has become immutable.

This means that even though ones are born and bred in Lagos and, speak Yoruba as fluently as any Ara Eko, they will still be identified (where this is possible) by the ethnicity of their parents (or grand-parents) and as a consequence, their rights as citizens may be curtailed.

It should be noted that this process of identification is not always a one way imposition. In some cases, these Lagos born and bred 'foreigners' insist on being identified as such by the markers they attach to themselves.

This never used to be the case but, we would be wrong to blame the modern world alone for this peculiarity. In Britain, as in most 'developed' countries, you are regarded as British if you are born in Britain - to get even more specific, you are a Liverpudlian if you are born and bred in Liverpool.

So, while the ethnic identity of your ancestors may remain apparent in the form of your surname (or skin colour), no one will question your claim to belonging to the country (or town) that you were born in. This is why ones like Benjamin Disraeli (Victorian era British Prime Minister with Jewish origins) could claim to be English, Nicolas Sarkozy (current French President with Hungarian origins) can claim to be a Frenchman and, Ian Wright (English national team footballer with African-Caribbean origins) can be described as a Londoner and an Englishman.

We should not hurry either to put the whole blame on government policies in Nigeria - at worst, the most that these did was to exacerbate tendencies that we had bought into wholeheartedly as individual members of various collectives.

By their natures, large urban areas are the most utilitarian tools of integrations that exist (especially in settings where the ethnicity of a person cannot be determined by appearance alone). We have had these tools all through the existence of Nigeria but, we have refused to make full use of them for the purpose of integration and nation-building.

So, we settle in these melting pots and we refuse to blend. We insist on clinging to our ancestral origins and, we program our children to do the same. And then, we make hollow and hypocritical denunciations divisions between settlers and indigenous people. Ignoring the fact that by refusing to identify ourselves as nationals of the area we have raised a family in, we are directly responsible for passing on causes of these divisions to the coming generations.

What I am saying is very simple and, it is something that has been obvious to many others in other time periods and, in other parts of the world: If we wish to unite as one people, then we must erase as many of the lines that divide us as we can.

So, if a Yoruba person settles permanently among the Izon, then the children that will be brought up to know that milieu as home must be given Izon names. If a Hausa person settles in the Remo town Sagamu, then the children that are born and bred in that town must be given names that will identify them as Remo. If an Igbo person settles in Bida, then the name given to his/her descendants must identify them as Nupe.

By no means is this all that needs to be done but it will be a good start and, a great improvement on what currently exists. And I wish to remind those who may get all hot and bothered by the proposal that they give up their precious Yoruba/Hausa/Igbo/etc. names that previously (and currently) many from the various ethnic groups in Nigeria have given (and are giving) their children names that originate in European, Jewish and Arabic cultures.

Some even have forenames and surnames from these non-African cultures (and heaven is yet to fall down on their heads). Truth is, while it is virtually impossible to find (for example) a Yoruba man with an Efik name, there are tens of thousands (if not millions) with European and Arabic names....and I am not talking here about those born in the colonial/'slavery' era but, of those who were born after Nigeria's so-called independence!

This fact by itself says a lot about where we are collectively in ethnic consciousness and, it also gives a good measure of how far we have traveled down the road to Nigeria becoming a real nation. Our willingness to practice and to accept full integration by settlers into host communities (be they in the west, east, south, or north) is directly proportional to how frank our declarations of Nigeria being one nation are. Please keep in mind that I am not suggesting that Sapele indigenes dwelling and raising families in Sapele adopt Tiv names/culture. What I am saying is, if you are a Hausa person who wishes to settle and live in Jos, then be prepared to fully integrate yourself into the indigenous community by adopting their culture. And if you, a Fulani person truly believes that Nigeria is one nation, then place no barriers to integration before Idoma people who wish to become a full members of the community that owns Sokoto.

Most (if not all) of what we struggle with today is a consequence of the fact that current Nigerian culture is nothing more than an agglomeration of many distinct ethnic cultures forced to co- exist in a geographical space that is under a unitary government while unity in the real sense does not exist.

If Nigerian leaders and people are truly sincere in the intent to become one people, then they need to forget about central government (or the current wielders of State 'power') passing edicts that will force people to tolerate each other or, give up their rights as historical owners of a piece of a land. The prospect of creating a nation in the geographical space Nigeria, while it may require some guidance from hands that must remain invisible, is an organic process that will take root only if all are willing to give up something. And in the case of indigenous identification, what needs to be given up is something that must be disposed of at the local level that each person inhabits.

This means that the settler must be prepared to let go of his/her adherence to his/her former ethnic identity and, the indigenous people must be prepared to dismantle all barriers that have been put up to ensure exclusivity. We will attain the heights of collective achievements as Nigerians not because of slogans that extol a non-existent Nigerian nation but when every individual is able to lay claim to and/or, move at will with great fluidity within the ethnic identities that actually exist in the geographical space.