PDA

View Full Version : [Article] Ribadu: Comeuppance And Lessons From History



Jideofor Adibe
Dec 25, 2008, 04:30 PM
<p> <p><strong><strong>Ribadu: Comeuppance and Lessons from History</strong></strong></p>&nbsp;<p> <p ><strong>Jideofor Adibe</strong>, PhD, LLM</p> <p ><a target="_blank" href="mailto:pcjadibe@yahoo.com"><u>pcjadibe@yahoo.com</u></a>&nbsp;</p> <p >The current travails of Nuhu Ribadu, the former boss of EFCC, the dreaded anti-graft agency, have received extensive media coverage. Mallam Ribadu was eased out of the EFCC in January this year ostensibly because he needed to attend a career development course at the National Institute of Policy and Strategic Studies (NIPSS) in Kuru, Plateau State.&nbsp;Suspicions that the so-called career development course was a mere ploy to shove him aside from EFCC have since been confirmed by events. Not only has he been demoted from being an Assistant Inspector General of Police to a Deputy Commissioner of Police, he now literally lives in fear of the same agency he once headed.</p> <p >Beyond Mallam Ribadu's regrettable travails, there are very important lessons from his experiences that should not be lost.&nbsp;</p> <p >One of the important lessons is that what goes around comes around. Though it may appear sadistic to regale in any one's troubles, such experiences could be useful if they end up teaching us valuable lessons about the need for restraint when we find ourselves in positions of authority. There was no doubt that Ribadu loved his job as the boss of EFCC and discharged his duties with passion and gusto. He was energetic, fearless and apparently determined. But he also went to extremes, unnecessarily courted media attention, and turned the agency into a behemoth that investigated, prosecuted, judged and condemned, not just the political class but also anyone of prominence. In more advanced societies, such agencies work surreptitiously, rarely courting media attention but still quietly very effective. Ribadu's style therefore not only made him powerful enemies but also excited the envy of his colleagues. Though Ribadu appears to have been prematurely canonised by a section of the media and the remnants of the Nigerian left, I still fail to see how abusing or criminalizing elected officials before such people are convicted by a competent court of law furthered the work of the agency. We cannot clamour for the rule of law, a key element of democracy, while embracing Ribadu's methods that clearly undermined the rule of law, however much we may loathe those suspected of corrupt enrichment or other forms of malfeasance.&nbsp;</p> <p >Another important lesson from the Ribadu saga is that in the discharge of public duties, having good intentions are not enough. The goals pursued, and the means used in pursuing those goals, do matter. Mallam Ribadu hounded candidates for political offices into detention, sometimes on the eve of elections in which they were candidates. In Plateau state for instance, the EFCC was reported to have supervised the illegal impeachment of Joshua Dariye. However the gravity of the allegations against him, due process, a key element of protecting everyone's right to fair trial, ought to have been respected. In more advanced societies, you remain a suspect, and treated as such, until convicted by a competent court of law, even if you were caught with your hands in the cookie jar. Ribadu's supporters have sought to excuse some of the unorthodox ways he went about his business by arguing that he meant well or that desperate times demanded for desperate measures. Unfortunately intentions, however noble they may be, remain at best unborn revolutions. Lawrence Anini, the notorious armed robber who terrorised Benin and its environs during the regime of Babangida, was known for stealing from the banks and spreading part of the loot to poor peasants in the local markets. He too could point to this as evidence of his good intentions.&nbsp;</p> <p >An equally important lesson from Ribadu' apparent persecution is that it may be utter foolishness to fight your employer frontally, especially if that employer is an African government.&nbsp;It is debatable whether it was wise of Ribadu to have employed, caused to be employed, or closed his eyes to the employment of media attacks on the government when it began to emerge that he was going to be removed from EFCC. If the aim was to twist the arm of his employer and safeguard his job, then it was a disastrous PR job. Rather than highlighting Ribadu's achievements and how he will complement or further the regime's declared interest in fighting corruption, the focus of his strategy appeared to be to rally media support on grounds that he was to be removed in order to protect some powerful interests. This strategy came across, rightly or wrongly, as blackmail, and may paradoxically have helped to seal his fate because it put the government in a position where to back down would have been a humiliation and also seen as a sign of weakness. Ribadu had genuine admirers in high places within and outside the country. A more surreptitious use of those contacts, without appearing to be engaging his employer in a David versus Goliath type of square-off, could perhaps have led to a different outcome.&nbsp;</p> <p >I believe he made similar mistakes with the hide-and-seek game he played with the EFCC when he was invited for questioning: first he refused to honour the invitation&nbsp;(turning it into a media campaign once again), then later honoured it (revealing he had buckled under pressure); he went to court to obtain an injunction to stop the agency from arresting him (a questionable move), then had to withdraw the case (tacitly admitting another defeat). There may therefore be an additional lesson of learning to discern between bravery and bravado, and hubris and firmness. While it may be difficult to be the chairman of EFCC without stepping on powerful toes, a wise navigation of the aforementioned boundaries would perhaps have enhanced his effectiveness at EFCC without necessarily making enemy of every powerful foot stepped upon. Smart diplomats and administrators are known to have the skills to separate the sin from the sinner, to ask you to go to hell and still be able to politely invite you out for a drink. We all know that whatever legalese may be used to cloak Ribadu's current troubles, some people are obviously taking their pound of flesh.&nbsp;</p> <p >I do not think it is opportunistic or cowardice to use pragmatic means to secure one's job or negotiate for soft-landing, if one must be shoved aside. It is, on the contrary, wisdom to know when to stoop to conquer, when to throw a punch, when to endure being turned into a punching bag, and when to counter-punch. Yes, your African government employer must be challenged in extreme cases of oppression, but as an individual still under their employment, you fight them sideways, not frontally. This strategy not only prolongs your fighting life but preserves your fighting capability.&nbsp;</p> <p >Ribadu's current problems also show that while power may be the ultimate aphrodisiac, it is equally ephemeral, transitional and ultimately a vanity. The quickness with which the halo departs from men and women of power in Nigeria once they vacate their authority position could be astounding. In his hey days, the fear of Ribadu was the beginning of wisdom in Nigeria. Today, he appears to be a lonely man in need of friends. An additional lesson from his experience therefore is the tendency of the predator to become the prey, and of the prey to become the predator, in Nigerian politics. Hopefully this lesson will also not be lost on Ribadu's traducers.&nbsp; <p >__________________</p> <p >Jideofor Adibe is editor of the multidisciplinary journal,&nbsp;<em>African Renaissance</em>, and publisher of Adonis &amp; Abbey Publishers Ltd (<a target="_blank" href="http://www.adonis-abbey.com/"><u>www.adonis-abbey.com</u></a>), a London-based publisher of books and journals. He can be reached at:&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="mailto:pcjadibe@yahoo.com"><u>pcjadibe@yahoo.com</u></a></p> <p> </p><br><br><a target="_blank" href=http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=11028><b>..Read the full article</b></a><br>

Dewdrops
Dec 25, 2008, 09:17 PM
Beyond Mallam Ribadu's regrettable travails, there are very important lessons from his experiences that should not be lost.

One of the important lessons is that what goes around comes around.
We cannot clamour for the rule of law, a key element of democracy, while embracing Ribadu's methods that clearly undermined the rule of law, however much we may loathe those suspected of corrupt enrichment or other forms of malfeasance.

Another important lesson from the Ribadu saga is that in the discharge of public duties, having good intentions are not enough.

The goals pursued, and the means used in pursuing those goals, do matter. Lawrence Anini, the notorious armed robber who terrorised Benin and its environs during the regime of Babangida, was known for stealing from the banks and spreading part of the loot to poor peasants in the local markets. He too could point to this as evidence of his good intentions.

An equally important lesson from Ribadu' apparent persecution is that it may be utter foolishness to fight your employer frontally, especially if that employer is an African government.

This strategy came across, rightly or wrongly, as blackmail, and may paradoxically have helped to seal his fate because it put the government in a position where to back down would have been a humiliation and also seen as a sign of weakness. Ribadu had genuine admirers in high places within and outside the country.

A more surreptitious use of those contacts, without appearing to be engaging his employer in a David versus Goliath type of square-off, could perhaps have led to a different outcome.

I believe he made similar mistakes with the hide-and-seek game he played with the EFCC when he was invited for questioning: first he refused to honour the invitation (turning it into a media campaign once again), then later honoured it (revealing he had buckled under pressure); he went to court to obtain an injunction to stop the agency from arresting him (a questionable move), then had to withdraw the case (tacitly admitting another defeat).

There may therefore be an additional lesson of learning to discern between bravery and bravado, and hubris and firmness.

While it may be difficult to be the chairman of EFCC without stepping on powerful toes, a wise navigation of the aforementioned boundaries would perhaps have enhanced his effectiveness at EFCC without necessarily making enemy of every powerful foot stepped upon. Smart diplomats and administrators are known to have the skills to separate the sin from the sinner, to ask you to go to hell and still be able to politely invite you out for a drink. We all know that whatever legalese may be used to cloak Ribadu's current troubles, some people are obviously taking their pound of flesh.

I do not think it is opportunistic or cowardice to use pragmatic means to secure one's job or negotiate for soft-landing, if one must be shoved aside. It is, on the contrary, wisdom to know when to stoop to conquer, when to throw a punch, when to endure being turned into a punching bag, and when to counter-punch. Yes, your African government employer must be challenged in extreme cases of oppression, but as an individual still under their employment, you fight them sideways, not frontally. This strategy not only prolongs your fighting life but preserves your fighting capability.

Ribadu's current problems also show that while power may be the ultimate aphrodisiac, it is equally ephemeral, transitional and ultimately a vanity.

The quickness with which the halo departs from men and women of power in Nigeria once they vacate their authority position could be astounding. In his hey days, the fear of Ribadu was the beginning of wisdom in Nigeria. Today, he appears to be a lonely man in need of friends. An additional lesson from his experience therefore is the tendency of the predator to become the prey, and of the prey to become the predator, in Nigerian politics. Hopefully this lesson will also not be lost on Ribadu's traducers.


Thank you very much...I thoroughly enjoyed this.:shake:

Lets do it again sometime ok?

Enforcer
Dec 25, 2008, 10:18 PM
I can see the logic of your argument. I would have liked you to also consider a situation approach to solving the Nigeria corruption problem, which Ribadu himself has acknowledged as the reason for some of his unorthodox methods. The level of corruption in Nigeria is such that the law does not protect the innocent but those that have the financial resources to buy justice.

What Ribadu was doing is akin to a mild revolution. Unfortunately, there were clear cases of selective prosecution. The reason why majority of Nigerians supported him can be liken to a case of half bread is better than none.

LoveNigeria
Dec 25, 2008, 10:45 PM
One of the important lessons is that what goes around comes around.
We cannot clamour for the rule of law, a key element of democracy, while embracing Ribadu’s methods that clearly undermined the rule of law, however much we may loathe those suspected of corrupt enrichment or other forms of malfeasance.

You and other commentators who have expressed similar opinion about Ribadu travails are missing THESE VITAL POINTS.

1. In Nigeria you can't really talk about IDEALS such as rule of law, due process when it comes to fighting corruption in Nigeria. In fact anyone who's going to have any success whatsoever in fighting corruption in Nigeria will have to use crude methods and tools. Democracy in Nigeria will not last -not with such HUGE monster as corruption embedded in it's fabric. Where is the so called rule of law if judges are corrupt ?


2. People like you do not really see corruption for what it is. Corruption is a HUGE monster that has paralyzed the progress of Nigeria and worse still it seem NOBODY can defeat this monster. Nigerians have become numb in a sense. It seems everybody has given up until Obasanjo (who's no saint by any definition) brought in Ribadu and EFCC. Ribadu was able to score some success despite Obasanjo and other handicaps.

3. What majority of Nigerians (and international community) see in Ribadu which you are missing is that it's the first time someone is prepared to take this MONSTER head on with zeal. It doesn't matter Ribadu's personal flaws or crudeness of his method. His zeal and result has at least shown what's possible -fear could be driven in to looters of the treasury. Tell me why should Nigerians not celebrate this guy ?

The question you and others should answer is :Which would you rather have ?
a. Looting with impunity without fear of any EFCC at all or an impotent/compromised EFCC.
b. An imperfect Ribadu EFCC zealous and uncompromising that is able to drive some fear in to looters.

Ispy
Dec 25, 2008, 10:59 PM
I had thought i would no longer make comments concerning the issue of the current travails of Ribadu but some aspects of your article i believe should not go without some comments which i should state are purely my views on these issues

"But he also went to extremes, unnecessarily courted media attention, and turned the agency into a behemoth that investigated, prosecuted, judged and condemned, not just the political class but also anyone of prominence".

Observers of the Nigerian problem will agree that it is primarily due to the massive corruption of its elite ie the political class and people of prominence,so i do not believe that anyone that is sincere about fighting corruption in Nigeria should start from the bottom rather it should begin from the political class who obvious;y also happen to be Nigeria's prominent citizens. I should also state that i am a witness to numerous raids on cybercafe's used by 419er's with most being relatively unkown young Nigerians, raids on the infamous Oluwole market, the parade of fraudsters that people had hitherto never even heard about(biggest 419 case in history ie brazilian Banker case) etc.

Also your seeming assertion that Ribadu unecessarily courted the media is one i disagree with. You cannot fight corruption in Nigeria 'quietly' the citizenry have a right to know what is happening and i dare say that the publicity given to Ribadu's fight is probably the single most important factor preventing his total annihilation today.

"In more advanced societies, such agencies work surreptitiously, rarely courting media attention but still quietly very effective. Ribadu’s style therefore not only made him powerful enemies but also excited the envy of his colleagues. Though Ribadu appears to have been prematurely canonised by a section of the media and the remnants of the Nigerian left, I still fail to see how abusing or criminalizing elected officials before such people are convicted by a competent court of law furthered the work of the agency. We cannot clamour for the rule of law, a key element of democracy, while embracing Ribadu’s methods that clearly undermined the rule of law, however much we may loathe those suspected of corrupt enrichment or other forms of malfeasance"

I have always believed that solutions tailored to other societies especially developed ones do not necessarily have to be 'copy and pasted' on the Nigerian landscape. Those agencies in the developed countries did not begin their fight today they have undergone series of reforms according to the level of development of their societies. If Ribadu had for instance not gone for Tafa the way he did and decided to use the 'developed country' approach Tafa's subsequent conviction would not have seen the light of day. Our so called elite, traditional rulers, political class would have worked underground to squash any further development. Was it not surprising that it was three former IG's (Gambo, Attah e.t.c)that stood surety for his bail.Also saying Ribadu approach made him powerful enemies and envy from his peers??? Can anyone truly fight corruption in Nigeria without making powerful enemies and if i am envied by my peers that probably means i must be doing something extraordinary, in a way they wish they could too. Any fight against corruption in Nigeria where the elite do not grumble is not being fought sincerely. That is why i strongly believe the current fight under Yaradua is just hogwash. Why? The Elite and Political class are just too silent and this can only mean one thing. IT'S BACK TO BUSINESS AS USUAL Nobody's boat is being rocked. One thing is synonymous with all the times corruption has truly been tackled ie during Murtala, Idiagbon regimes, and that is THE ELITES/RULING CLASS SCREAMED BLUE MURDER. Ribadu's sometimes disregard for the rule of law as you mentioned was i agree one of his shortcomings, however even legal luminaries in Nigeria have advocated for a complete judicial review in Nigeria because the law in Nigeria could sometimes seem as been open to abuse with a court injuction being able to be obtained in the deep jungle of Aba to prevent a criminal arrest in sokoto. Need i give examples of current obvious abuse by the Iboris, Odili, Kalu and Igbenedion's.This was probably why one of Nigerias Titans in Law and anti corruption crusader, chief Gani Fawehinmi till today remains one of Ribadus biggest fan. The laws in developed countries also have undergone necessary amendments over the years and cannot also be compared with Nigeria. Also previous seemingly successful fights against corruption (Murtala, Idiagbon)were carried out under military regimes.


"An equally important lesson from Ribadu’ apparent persecution is that it may be utter foolishness to fight your employer frontally, especially if that employer is an African government".

For an advocate of the rule of law and follwing the examples of developed countries this statemen t came as a surprise to me. What is wrong in Ribadu going to court to fight his demotion knowing the so called irregular promotion he was accused of having enjoyed was fairly common in the Police Force with the current IG also being a recipient of such a promotion!!!


"I believe he made similar mistakes with the hide-and-seek game he played with the EFCC when he was invited for questioning: first he refused to honour the invitation (turning it into a media campaign once again), then later honoured it (revealing he had buckled under pressure); he went to court to obtain an injunction to stop the agency from arresting him (a questionable move), then had to withdraw the case (tacitly admitting another defeat). There may therefore be an additional lesson of learning to discern between bravery and bravado, and hubris and firmness".


It is my opinion that knowing that the current head of the EFCC and the IG were actually nominated/recommended for their postions by some of his most bitter enemies due to his fight against corruption(Ibori,Saraki etc) and also seem to be in control of the present government. Ribadu should not be blamed for threading carefully. Knowing in your mind that you mean a lion no harm does not mean you jump in its cage!!


"I do not think it is opportunistic or cowardice to use pragmatic means to secure one’s job or negotiate for soft-landing, if one must be shoved aside"

Once again you seem to turn around to recommend a Nigerian Solution to a Nigerian Problem when it seems convenient. No longer sticking to arguments of the rule of law or what obtains in developed countries. My question is why should he negotiate for a so called softlanding(though i doubt it would even have helped him much) if he genuinely believed he had done nothing wrong but simply tried to serve his country as best he could.


On a last note my personal opinion remains that Ribadu though had his shortcomings, he fought corruption the only way it can be fought in the Nigeria of today, nobody he prosecuted or tried to prosecute(Ibori, Kalu, Igbenidion, Alameisegha, Atiku etc) was or has been proven to be innocent of the charges levelled against them,selective judgement or not. He carried the fight to an extent where the next person at EFCC sould have continued making necessary adjustments along the way. This i believe is the way developed countries got to where they are today. Things were not perfect when they started out as well and Nigeria should not be expected to be an exception. Ribadu was merely a forerunner and so may have made some mistakes!!

Iyke
Dec 26, 2008, 01:26 AM
I quite agree with you that Ribadu commited procedural errors, however the police force commited more in its outright dismissal. the police force could have saved the dismissal for the moment, give the whole issue some time and find appropriate means to settle it to avoid a tinge of vindictiveness.

All the same it a good lesson on power.

Luchi
Dec 26, 2008, 06:36 AM
I agree with some of the points you made, power is certainly transient in nature. However, i beg to disagree with your comments about taking his employers/EFCC to court. The Govt plan was to use EFCC in detaining Ribadu so that he would not be able to attend the NIPSS graduation but his court action threw them off balance. Hence, the show of shame that occurred on the graduation day.

Mahadum
Dec 26, 2008, 07:53 AM
Dear Jideofor Adibe:

God bless you for taking out time to write this masterpiece of an opinion on Malam Nuhu Ribadu. I am in total agreement with every point you have raised. I have been religiously following the discussion on Malam Nuhu Ribadu.

Here you have a lawyer and a senior police officer, who would arrest those perceived to be opponents of Obasanjo, call a press conference and declare them guilty of whatever crime he had charged them of committing, and then add that the investigation was ongoing.

At that time, I would ask myself; what kind of a lawyer is this? Why is it that this guy would not do his job behind the scene as an experienced investigator and allow his communication director to handle all media affairs?

I remember one particular case that he had accused the Gongola State governor, among other things, of embezzling the state's fund to build personal guest houses. It turned out that the guest houses were state guest houses built on government property to alleviate the shortage of accommodations and save money from the high cost of hotel bills.. The governor asked how anyone could have built personal guest houses on government land but Nuhu did not care to offer any rebuttable facts.

The other time, he was accused of buying the IG's guest house for N250 million and he had the temerity to tell Nigerians that the house belonged to his father in-law Prof. Iya Abubakar. If not in Nigeria, how could a retired university president (ABU Vice-Chancellor) have or qualify for a loan of N250 million? Beside, while Nuhu was working for the Nigerian government, his father in-law would take a whopping loan of N250 million to provide accommodation for him. If not in Nigeria, where else can a retired professor of mathematics borrow N250 million to buy a mansion for his son in-law?

Without prejudice to opinions already expressed, I would want to point out that one thing has remained constant in the argument of those who have been defending Malam Nuhu Ribadu. Somewhere buried in their defence is always It is true that mistakes have been made here and there in discharging his duties.

Once I see that caveat, the whole argument would become bunkum to me because my case that Nuhu deserves every "kitchen sink" that is being thrown at him is based on that caveat. I am yet to read one defence in his favor that does not have a line of that caveat. Not one! Once I see that caveat, I would, like mutanin arewa, say shikena.

Sam C. Okudah, Mazi

aguabata
Dec 26, 2008, 10:30 AM
Senior officials of EFCC were driving luxury cars siezed from fraudsters as official vehichles, they even administered the sale of siezed properties (sure of this fact), On what grounds should another man borrow 250million Naira to buy a house for a son inlaw? I know Yerima, Ibori and co must have met Yaradua and told him about some of Ribadu's flaws which Yaradua would easily investigate and confirm by making a maximum of three phone calls, after which he will conclude that Ribadu should go and that was probably how his extinction began. The moral of the story is that key public officers especially those fighting corruption should have the highest form of integrity and fully understand what amounts to abuse of office. I will find Ribadu guilty of abuse of office, but never of corruption. Ribadu's core skills are unprofessional he simply has a natural passion to fight corruption but not the professional skills. If the EFCC under Ribadu could establish criminal evidence against a Governor, the immunity clause does not prevent the Governors from being prosecuted. Everybody knows Chimaroke Nnamani owns a line up of buisnesses in Enugu using friends and relatives as fronts but how can you prove legally that they are linked to him, there lies the problem of EFCC. Instead of bending down more of the time to do a back breaking work of digging up evidence they run to the media to announce the scale of the corruption without thinking hard on how to nail all those slimy crooks. I actually believed Waziri (though a clown) when she said she found no useful evidence to work with.

LoveNigeria
Dec 26, 2008, 02:00 PM
I will find Ribadu guilty of abuse of office, but never of corruption. Ribadu's core skills are unprofessional he simply has a natural passion to fight corruption but not the professional skills.

That my brother is a necessary but insufficient prerequisite anyone who wants to fight corruption must have -which is what Waziri doesn't have. With that alone Ribadu was able to score some success despite Obasanjo and other handicaps. I dare say that's what Muritala, Buhari/Idiagbon had. That's what Gani and majority of Nigerians see in Ribadu.

abdulmumin
Dec 26, 2008, 03:33 PM
I remember one particular case that he had accused the Gongola State governor, among other things, of embezzling the state's fund to build personal guest houses. It turned out that the guest houses were state guest houses built on government property to alleviate the shortage of accommodations and save money from the high cost of hotel bills.. The governor asked how anyone could have built personal guest houses on government land but Nuhu did not care to offer any rebuttable facts.
There is no such state as Gongola state in Nigeria.


The other time, he was accused of buying the IG's guest house for N250 million and he had the temerity to tell Nigerians that the house belonged to his father in-law Prof. Iya Abubakar. If not in Nigeria, how could a retired university president (ABU Vice-Chancellor) have or qualify for a loan of N250 million? Beside, while Nuhu was working for the Nigerian government, his father in-law would take a whopping loan of N250 million to provide accommodation for him. If not in Nigeria, where else can a retired professor of mathematics borrow N250 million to buy a mansion for his son in-law?

I don't get your point sir. What if his father in-law acquired a N250m house? If you want to investigate Nuhu's in-law or Nuhu himself, go ahead and do so but don't cast aspersions.

tonsoyo
Dec 26, 2008, 03:35 PM
Your article appeared to be a selective understanding of the issues surrounding Ribadu's fight against corruption because your argument is like a one-eyed man perception of an event, completely either ignoring or missing the environment and the totality of the circumstances surrounding his operations.

You failed to see or delibrately failed to acknowledge that Nigeria is a country where judgments are given to free rogues at 3 O'clock in the morning, where Judges will outlaw an accused person by granting a perpetual injunction that the person should never be arrested, it is a country where an High Judge sits to review a decision of a Court of Appeal. Yes those are the mountains that Ribadu had to climb!

Thank you for acknowledging this..."He was energetic, fearless and apparently determined..."But I disagree when you say Ribadu courted media attention, because you failed to understand that Ribadu DID NOT initially courted media attention, but the media took interest in an "...energetic, fearless and apparently determined..." man who was fighting corruption the way it has never been fought before in Nigeria, everything he did becomes newsworthy.
How can the Press fail to take an interest in the arrest of serving Governors, Inspector General of Police, Ministers and celebrated 419ners in a country like Nigeria?
No he did not court media, rather the media sought after him, his deeds are novel and sell newspapers like hot cake, not only in Nigeria mind you...

You erroneously alluded so much to "more advanced societies" that I begin to wonder what your definition of "more advanced societies" is, or how much you know about "more advanced societies" But what I know is that unconventional methods are employed to get high profile criminals all over the world. And you know what O.J. Simpson got legally lynched for "murder" 11 years after he was conventionally acquitted!

It is laughable that you want Ribadu to patronize those who are determined to get rid of him at all cost. You want him to highlight his "achievements" the "achievements" which is the sole reason they were after him, what is wrong with you?

Ribadu knew there is no way he could win against those determined powerful enemies he got doing his job, this is why he had to fight them frontally to expose their follies.

I am sure even Ribadu himself knew that power is ephemeral, but the world is a stage, you must try and act well your part. He tried. God willing, he shall be back!

NextLevel
Dec 26, 2008, 04:02 PM
This article makes many interesting claims that seem to duck the fact that Nigeria is not a serious country. Let's look at some of them.

The idea that Ribadu did not follow the rule of law has been repeatedly bandied as a truism on this web board. Ribadu has always claimed that none of the methods he used were illegal and if any of them were, his opponents should take him to court. None of them every took him up on the offer. Why?

Then we have the comparison between Ribadu and Anini made by the author, some of us forgetting that Anini killed many innocent people whose only crime was that they had money or drove decent cars. Without citing an equally criminal act on the part of Ribadu, the author thinks this comparison is just. Why?

Then I'm surprised that a lawyer with a PhD would provide such an inept description of Ribadu's refusal to deal with the EFCC. Ribadu has a case in court arguing that his demotion was illegal. Many of the subsequent actions of the government stem the claim that his demotion was proper and made after proper consideration of the facts. But this is precisely what Ribadu is challenging in court. Why not wait for the court to rule on this issue before we start deciding that Ribadu's refusal to follow orders from his employer are simply a pompous display of insubordination? A dead police offer who was also accused of illegal promotion had his rank reinstated, which shows that exceptions can be made. Since one exception exists, then it is possible to decide the case of Ribadu on its merits, not with a universal claim that all illegal promotions cannot be left to stand.

And Ribadu's refusal to honor the EFCC invitation: when you have evidence that a body has been politicized and your life is in danger, would you accept an invitation from the EFCC just because it has been offered to you? No, you investigate and assure that you are in safe hands should you accept the invitation. This is what Ribadu did, but obviously, our esteemed lawyer and author wants us to believe that Ribadu. having watched how fellow EFCC officers who had accepted similar invitations were treated, was simply dancing to his own drum rather than being a cautious man. He withdrew the request for injunction against arrest after having met with the EFCC. Does this register at all with our lawyer author?

Finally, the author goes on to claim that Ribadu has lost his halo. Hogwash - the only people who think that Ribadu has no halo are those who never thought so in the first place. The machinations of those in the anti-Ribadu clique currently ruling Nigeria are an obvious sign to those of us who are clear thinking that Ribadu meant well for Nigeria. For men who do not mean well for Nigeria usually find dollars an easy reward for joining AGIP (any government in power).

People can write all these articles to justify why Ribadu's current treatment is justified because under Obasanjo's latest regime, Ribadu allowed the EFCC to be politicized. Those of us who know an honest man when we see one know better. All you anti-Ribaduists, don't stain yourselves too much.

Bunch17
Dec 26, 2008, 04:22 PM
This article makes many interesting claims that seem to duck the fact that Nigeria is not a serious country. Let's look at some of them.

The idea that Ribadu did not follow the rule of law has been repeatedly bandied as a truism on this web board. Ribadu has always claimed that none of the methods he used were illegal and if any of them were, his opponents should take him to court. None of them every took him up on the offer. Why?

Then we have the comparison between Ribadu and Anini made by the author, some of us forgetting that Anini killed many innocent people whose only crime was that they had money or drove decent cars. Without citing an equally criminal act on the part of Ribadu, the author thinks this comparison is just. Why?

Then I'm surprised that a lawyer with a PhD would provide such an inept description of Ribadu's refusal to deal with the EFCC. Ribadu has a case in court arguing that his demotion was illegal. Many of the subsequent actions of the government stem the claim that his demotion was proper and made after proper consideration of the facts. But this is precisely what Ribadu is challenging in court. Why not wait for the court to rule on this issue before we start deciding that Ribadu's refusal to follow orders from his employer are simply a pompous display of insubordination? A dead police offer who was also accused of illegal promotion had his rank reinstated, which shows that exceptions can be made. Since one exception exists, then it is possible to decide the case of Ribadu on its merits, not with a universal claim that all illegal promotions cannot be left to stand.

And Ribadu's refusal to honor the EFCC invitation: when you have evidence that a body has been politicized and your life is in danger, would you accept an invitation from the EFCC just because it has been offered to you? No, you investigate and assure that you are in safe hands should toy accept the invitation. This is what Ribadu did, but obviously, our esteemed lawyer and author wants us to believe that Ribadu. having watched how fellow EFCC officers who had accepted similar invitations were treated, was simply dancing to his own drum rather than being a cautious man. He withdrew the injunction after having met with the EFCC. Does this register at all with our lawyer author?

Finally, the author goes on to claim that Ribadu has lost his halo. Hogwash - the only people who think that Ribadu has no halo are those who never thought so in the first place. The machinations of those in the anti-Ribadu clique currently ruling Nigeria are an obvious sign to those of us who are clear thinking that Ribadu meant well for Nigeria. For men who do not mean well for Nigeria usually find dollars an easy reward for joining AGIP (any government in power).

People can write all these articles to justify why Ribadu's current treatment is justified because under Obasanjo's latest regime, Ribadu allowed the EFCC to be politicized. Those of us who know an honest man when we see one know better. All you anti-Ribaduists, don't stain yourselves too much.

I have never been so disappointed in my sojourn here in the NVS. People who are usually extremely critical and analytical are buying the myth created by the press over one of Nigeria's greatest con artist.

Am I the only one here who thinks that there is something wrong with a chap paying the press over 80,000 pounds monthly to project him positively? No not his organisation but him. How many of you in the UK know the head of the Serious Fraud Office? Anyway, that seems to have paid dividends as we are still discussing him, so I guess it was money well spent.

Am I the only one here worried by the fact that the property of the 419 magnets auctioned in Lagos and Abuja (over 20) were bought by the same two individuals even when there bigs were the lowest?

Am I the only one worried that an individual who bid 3.5billion Naira to purchase a property in Abuja only paid 2.2billion, yet according to EFCC he has fully paid for the house.

Am I the only one concerned that this "honest" man is yet to do that which is paramount in of any honest government official ie to have his books audited?

Am I the only one concerned that his hand over brief was less than all of one side of an A4 sheet?

I think it time people wake up to the realisation that the emperor has no clothes.

tonsoyo
Dec 26, 2008, 05:02 PM
I have never been so disappointed in my sojourn here in the NVS. People who are usually extremely critical and analytical are buying the myth created by the press over one of Nigeria's greatest con artist.

Am I the only one here who thinks that there is something wrong with a chap paying the press over 80,000 pounds monthly to project him positively? No not his organisation but him. How many of you in the UK know the head of the Serious Fraud Office? Anyway, that seems to have paid dividends as we are still discussing him, so I guess it was money well spent.

Am I the only one here worried by the fact that the property of the 419 magnets auctioned in Lagos and Abuja (over 20) were bought by the same two individuals even when there bigs were the lowest?

Am I the only one worried that an individual who bid 3.5billion Naira to purchase a property in Abuja only paid 2.2billion, yet according to EFCC he has fully paid for the house.

Am I the only one concerned that this "honest" man is yet to do that which is paramount in of any honest government official ie to have his books audited?

Am I the only one concerned that his hand over brief was less than all of one side of an A4 sheet?

I think it time people wake up to the realisation that the emperor has no clothes.

Bunch,
Thank God your picture is covering your handle, so I am going to pretend you did not write the tales by the moonlight above.

Can you please show us some proof of your assertions above? Or you think we are naive and should take that information hook, line and sinkers, just because you said so?

We have heard of greater unsubtantiated allegations against him, like the phantom houses he bought in UK and Dubai. Tell us something that we did not know.

Bunch17
Dec 26, 2008, 05:26 PM
Bunch,
Thank God your picture is covering your handle, so I am going to pretend you did not write the tales by the moonlight above.

Can you please show us some proof of your assertions above? Or you think we are naive and should take that information hook, line and sinkers, just because you said so?

We have heard of greater unsubtantiated allegations against him, like the phantom houses he bought in UK and Dubai. Tell us something that we did not know.

Tonsoyo,

Lol, these are not tales by the moonlight. This is the real thing. Unfortunately I am unable to give you further details in such a public forum as I no wan die.

You can start be investigating some of the things I have written above such as not having his accounts audited all the while he was head of the EFCC.

You can start also by finding out what the bids for Emmanuel Nwude's houses in VI were and also how much Otedola paid for them. While at it find out what the bids for Anajemba's Abuja mansion were and how much was the winning bid and how much the winner ultimately paid for it.

Finally find out from any member of the press if they had a regular retainership from the former EFCC boss.

PS: Remember I was nearly eaten alive 2 years ago on NVS when I questioned all the praises that were being heaped on Dora.
Consider this: Assuming Nuhu was not part and parcel of the corrupt system, why has he not taken his so called dossier to the public?

BTW: Contrary to what is being portrayed here, Nuhus travails are actually are as a result of petitions written by Emmanuel Nwude as well as the intension of some people( in the NPF) to get there pound of flesh.

The lesson here is that when one is persecuting an anti corruption fight, one should come with clean hands

MrOneNaija
Dec 26, 2008, 09:57 PM
I am sure even Ribadu himself knew that power is ephemeral, but the world is a stage, you must try and act well your part. He tried. God willing, he shall be back!
More delusions!

NextLevel
Dec 26, 2008, 10:18 PM
I have never been so disappointed in my sojourn here in the NVS. People who are usually extremely critical and analytical are buying the myth created by the press over one of Nigeria's greatest con artist.

Am I the only one here who thinks that there is something wrong with a chap paying the press over 80,000 pounds monthly to project him positively? No not his organisation but him. How many of you in the UK know the head of the Serious Fraud Office? Anyway, that seems to have paid dividends as we are still discussing him, so I guess it was money well spent.

Could you please list the people who were paid the bribe? We have Ibori on record as saying that bribing the press is something that should be done. So I know that Ibori thinks that such actions are legitimate. But please reference the source and nature of your allegation. Many of the loudest supporters of Ribadu (The Punch, The Guardian) are headed by individuals who might be in error on Ribadu, but I can tell you quite confidently that their opinions of Ribadu are not for sale.

You were willing to go so far as to claim that Ribadu was the cause of the failed prosecution of Ibori when it was AG I-Dont-Kia that let Ibori off the hook, but we are yet to see your mea culpa in writing.



Am I the only one here worried by the fact that the property of the 419 magnets auctioned in Lagos and Abuja (over 20) were bought by the same two individuals even when there bigs were the lowest?

Am I the only one worried that an individual who bid 3.5billion Naira to purchase a property in Abuja only paid 2.2billion, yet according to EFCC he has fully paid for the house.

Am I the only one concerned that this "honest" man is yet to do that which is paramount in of any honest government official ie to have his books audited?

Am I the only one concerned that his hand over brief was less than all of one side of an A4 sheet?

I think it time people wake up to the realisation that the emperor has no clothes.

You are not the only one worried. You are however, one of the many, even if a minority, to have made your worries over unsubstantiated allegations far more important than Ribadu's track record of genuine achievement. Ribadu is on record as having denied all these allegations (even the claim that he didn't declare his wealth before becoming EFCC chairman). So as they say, over to you!

Pray tell, show us the evidence of Ribadu's lavish wealth. When I was in Nigeria, I was witness to Ibori sponsoring the WAFU Under 20 cup. Now when one man who until he entered office was a man of OK means is able to fund a TV covered event out of the largesse of his own pocket after leaving power, that tells you something about our country.

Yet, we won't here our sages speaking out loudly when Ibori is doing these things. We hear them trying to soil Ribadu as if our expectations of what the anti-corruption battle can be were not raised by this National Hero!

NL

NextLevel
Dec 26, 2008, 10:23 PM
Tonsoyo,

Lol, these are not tales by the moonlight. This is the real thing. Unfortunately I am unable to give you further details in such a public forum as I no wan die.



LOL. Now I know why you don't like Ribadu!

Enforcer
Dec 27, 2008, 08:10 AM
Tonsoyo,

BTW: Contrary to what is being portrayed here, Nuhus travails are actually are as a result of petitions written by Emmanuel Nwude as well as the intension of some people( in the NPF) to get there pound of flesh.

The lesson here is that when one is persecuting an anti corruption fight, one should come with clean hands

Bunch17

I am trying very hard to believe you didn't write this in a normal circumstance.

Logic tells me that if all the corruption allegations against Ribadu are true and none has been used against him at a time they want to get their pound of flesh then there is more to the story than meets the eye. Why is that hard for you to see?

Like I said before on similar issues, if there is evidence to support any allegation against anyone, the proper thing to do is to present the case before the court of law rather through innuendos in the press.

ikechukwu
Dec 27, 2008, 09:12 AM
Tonsoyo,

Lol, these are not tales by the moonlight. This is the real thing. Unfortunately I am unable to give you further details in such a public forum as I no wan die.

You can start be investigating some of the things I have written above such as not having his accounts audited all the while he was head of the EFCC. You can start also by finding out what the bids for Emmanuel Nwude's houses in VI were and also how much Otedola paid for them. While at it find out what the bids for Anajemba's Abuja mansion were and how much was the winning bid and how much the winner ultimately paid for it.Finally find out from any member of the press if they had a regular retainership from the former EFCC boss.

PS: Remember I was nearly eaten alive 2 years ago on NVS when I questioned all the praises that were being heaped on Dora.
Consider this: Assuming Nuhu was not part and parcel of the corrupt system, why has he not taken his so called dossier to the public?

BTW: Contrary to what is being portrayed here, Nuhus travails are actually are as a result of petitions written by Emmanuel Nwude as well as the intension of some people( in the NPF) to get there pound of flesh.

The lesson here is that when one is persecuting an anti corruption fight, one should come with clean hands

Bunch17,
These(BOLDEB PORTIONs) are weighty allegations, It would be nice to see answers. I have learnt to take such allegations serious ever since late Lamidi Adedibu alledged that Dora Akunyili's railings against him was because of her inability to get him(Adedibu) put in words for her before UMYA on ministerial appointment. Now we all know better, her holier than thou disposition is now in a sorry state even among her admirers.

Luchi
Dec 27, 2008, 09:58 AM
I have never been so disappointed in my sojourn here in the NVS. People who are usually extremely critical and analytical are buying the myth created by the press over one of Nigeria's greatest con artist.

Am I the only one here who thinks that there is something wrong with a chap paying the press over 80,000 pounds monthly to project him positively? No not his organisation but him. How many of you in the UK know the head of the Serious Fraud Office? Anyway, that seems to have paid dividends as we are still discussing him, so I guess it was money well spent.

Am I the only one here worried by the fact that the property of the 419 magnets auctioned in Lagos and Abuja (over 20) were bought by the same two individuals even when there bigs were the lowest?

Am I the only one worried that an individual who bid 3.5billion Naira to purchase a property in Abuja only paid 2.2billion, yet according to EFCC he has fully paid for the house.

Am I the only one concerned that this "honest" man is yet to do that which is paramount in of any honest government official ie to have his books audited?

Am I the only one concerned that his hand over brief was less than all of one side of an A4 sheet?

I think it time people wake up to the realisation that the emperor has no clothes.

Bunch17,
You mean that after one year of leaving EFCC, Aaoondoka, Waziri and co could not use any of the allegations you listed above to nail Nuhu, rather they are still busy running from pillar to post searching for straws to latch onto?

Bunch17
Dec 27, 2008, 10:13 AM
Bunch17,
You mean that after one year of leaving EFCC, Aaoondoka, Waziri and co could not use any of the allegations you listed above to nail Nuhu, rather they are still busy running from pillar to post searching for straws to latch onto?

Mark my words, Ribadu is heading to jail. Unlike during his time when he huffed and puffed and he did not nail them, this time they are being very clinical in dismantling the myth. When they are finished, his foreign supporters will not touch him with a barge pole.

BTW: Was it not the invitation to EFCC to render account of his time at EFCC that made him head to the courts?

Enforcer
Dec 27, 2008, 10:19 AM
Bunch17,
You mean that after one year of leaving EFCC, Aaoondoka, Waziri and co could not use any of the allegations you listed above to nail Nuhu, rather they are still busy running from pillar to post searching for straws to latch onto?

Luchi

If it is too good to be true, probably it is. If Nigerians aren't gullible people, allegations like these would lead to the citizens rising up against the persons making the allegations to substantiate their claims in order to prosecute the allege offender. Sadly, Nigerians are gullible people.

Bunch17
Dec 27, 2008, 10:24 AM
.................... Sadly, Nigerians are gullible people.

Well said!

Enforcer
Dec 27, 2008, 10:25 AM
Mark my words, Ribadu is heading to jail. Unlike during his time when he huffed and puffed and he did not nail them, this time they are being very clinical in dismantling the myth. When they are finished, his foreign supporters will not touch him with a barge pole.

BTW: Was it not the invitation to EFCC to render account of his time at EFCC that made him head to the courts?

Bunch17

That isn't a new prophesy! Ibori promised us how he would deal with Ribadu in stages. Presently things are going according to his plan.

My brother, bear in mind that no condition is permanent....especially when 2011 is in the horizon.....time is of the essence here. We will see!!

Bunch17
Dec 27, 2008, 10:54 AM
Bunch17

That isn't a new prophesy! Ibori promised us how he would deal with Ribadu in stages. Presently things are going according to his plan.

My brother, bear in mind that no condition is permanent....especially when 2011 is in the horizon.....time is of the essence here. We will see!!

Enforcer,

Do you think it would have been easy to deal with Ribadu is he did not have so many skeletons in his cupboard? People in a position which Ribadu was in have two ways for protecting themselves; Do your job honestly and dont run with the foxes and chase with the hounds or hold on to there positions until dead.

Well he tried the later but it did not succeed. This has laid him open to being unmasked as a fraud which he was.

Enforcer
Dec 27, 2008, 11:10 AM
Enforcer,

Do you think it would have been easy to deal with Ribadu is he did not have so many skeletons in his cupboard? People in a position which Ribadu was in have two ways for protecting themselves; Do your job honestly and dont run with the foxes and chase with the hounds or hold on to there positions until dead.

Well he tried the later but it did not succeed. This has laid him open to being unmasked as a fraud which he was.

Bunch17

The strainght answer to your question is yes. In Nigeria anything is possible.

The issue here for me isn't whether Ribadu was not at all corrupt. The fact that he was promoted twice in one year without objecting to it, knowing the Police promotion conditions, cleary indicate a man quilty of corruption.

The real issue is whether he did a good job while in office, given the prevailing perculiar Nigerian circumstances. There is a Bini saying that when a man climbs up a tall tree, do not praise him until you know how he got up there. I believe in this wisdom and assess situations with this wisdom in mind. Ribadu did a good job.

Permit me to repeat this again, 2011 isn't too far away, my brother.