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View Full Version : Book Review Now I Know: A Review of Half of a Yellow Sun



Rudolf Ogoo Okonkwo
Sep 25, 2008, 10:11 PM
<p>At the 41st anniversary of the pogrom of 1966, I
wrote a short story I called The Blank Tape. It is a story of a video
tape in which frames of the pogrom were recorded ends up blank when
played back. The blank tape is a metaphor for all that we do not know
about the events that led to the war. If I had read <em>Half of A Yellow Sun</em>, I would not have felt so blank.</p>
<p><em>Half of A Yellow Sun</em>
(HYS) begins at the days of innocence sprinkled with idealism and
promises. Ugwu, an amiable houseboy, goes to live with a radical math
professor, Odenigbo, at the
University of
Nigeria. He will become a
reverse mirror of his master, the glue that ties the distinct stories
of his master, the master's girlfriend, Olanna, Olanna's twin sister
Kainene, Kainene's English boyfriend Richard, and a war that brings
them all together.</p>

<p>Seen
primarily from the eye of Ugwu, HYS shows him growing from a boy
thirsty for knowledge to an astute observer of life around him. All
house boys are influential but Ugwu belongs to the category of very
influential house boy, VIHP. When he is conscripted to fight for
Biafra, he leaves a hole behind. Once reported killed in battle, his ghost hovers around until he is seen again, wounded in
Biafra. </p>

<p>Though
born twins, Olanna and Kainene cannot be any more different. Their
relationship with each other and their rich business parents shows no
closeness. Still, despite the dysfunctional nature of their family, the
war, rather than break the twins permanently, ends up bringing them
closer.</p>

<p>Though
London educated, Olanna finds a surrogate family in Aunty Ifeka, the wife of her Uncle, Mbaezi, who lives in
Kano. Aunty Ifeka is the woman who
breast-fed her and her twin when their mother's breast milk dried up,
or according to Kainene, when her mother becomes scared that her breast
might droop. She is the woman she openly wishes is her mother.</p>

<p>Olanna travels to northern city of
Kano to cool off when facing changing
tides of life. It is where she has a family she could not make out of
her own immediate family. It is also where she has a friend, Mohammed,
she could not make a husband out of. It therefore follows that it is in
the same
Kano that she confronts the impending
war when she becomes a witness to the massacre of her beloved aunt,
uncle and her pregnant cousin, Arinze.</p>

<p>What proverbs did for Achebe in <em>Things Fall Apart</em>, piercing portrayal of human spirit does the same for Adichie. </p>

<p>Adichie
shines most when she is dealing with human relationships. Here is how
Olanna confirms her suspicion that something happened between Odenigbo
and Amala by mere looking at their interaction when she arrives from a
trip to Kano: "It was a tiny moment, brief and fleeting, but Olanna
noticed how scrupulously they avoided any contact, any touch of skin as
if they were united by a common knowledge so monumental that they were
determined not to be united by anything else."</p>

<p>Olanna goes to
Kano, to Aunty Ifeka to find solace. There she finds words of wisdom from her aunt about Odenigbo and life.</p>

<p>"Odenigbo
has done what all men do and has inserted his penis in the first hole
he could find when you were away. Does that mean somebody died?"</p>

<p>Talking
about her own experience with her husband, Aunty Ifeka says, "I now
know that nothing he does will make my life change. My life will change
only if I want it to change."</p>

<p>"You
must never behave as if your life belongs to a man. Do you hear me?
Your life belongs to you and you alone," she advices Olanna. </p>

<p>Olanna
in her depression sleeps with Richard. It crushes a relationship with
her sister that has been largely distant. This is how Kainene reacts to
Olanna's betrayal: "You're the good one and the fortunate one and the
beauty and the Africanist revolutionary who doesn't like white men, and
you simply did not need to **** him. So why did you?"</p>

<p>Just as she did in <em>Purple Hibiscus</em>,
Adichie captures the sounds and sense of the generation in its brutal
honesty, like when she watches two kids playing and one saying to the
other, "your mother's pussy."</p>

<p>In
several interviews, Adichie has said that she did not set out to write
a war novel. She wants to see HYS as a love story. Her only savior is
in the crafty decision to halt the story at Part Two and jump into Part
Three. Part Three rescues it from what is more than a war novel, but
one that makes its readers want to go back to war. It brings the tempo
down, explains the mystery of the baby that suddenly arrived in Part
two.</p>

<p>Odenigbo's
idealism is tried several times in the course of the book. "The reason
we live the life we do is because we do not remember that we will die,"
he says as he mourns the killing of his mother in
Biafra. The intellectual quickly degenerates into a drunk as the struggle for
Biafra flutters. The mantra, "If the sun refuses to rise, we will make it rise," becomes an empty expression.</p>

<p>In the
mist of the war, while Olanna is eking out a living, she gets a letter
from Mohammed, her northern prince friend who finds it important to
inform her that, "My polo game is much improved." To be fair to him, he
also sends soap.</p>

<p>The saboteur virus in Biafra is so pronounced that Olanna has to complain, "We cannot keep beating people because
Nigeria is beating us." In
spite of the damaging impact of the saboteur phenomenon, Richard, a
believer in the Biafran cause has hope as he observes: "A country born
out of the ashes of injustice would limit its practice of injustice" </p>
<p>In
planting her story inside the war, Adichie presents the picture of what
transpired before and during the war. "A single act could reverberate
over time and space and leave stains that would never be washed off,"
She writes. </p>

<p><em>Half of a Yellow Sun</em>
implicates the conscience of everyone who reads it: those who know but
do not care; those who care but do not know; and those who do not know
and do not care. For readers like me who know little about the war, HYS
gives them a full picture. It shows in frames after frames how it all
developed.</p>

<p>It all
started with the British experience in trying to conquer the Africans.
The Igbo gave them toughest time because the Igbo had no kings to be
bought over. And when the British succeeded through brutal wars, the
Igbo immediately constituted themselves into the bulk of the opposition
against the British rule. It came to a head on with the general strike
of 1945. The British blamed the Igbo for the strike. They banned Igbo
published newspapers. The British generally encouraged anti-Igbo
sentiments which began to spread fast across the country. The British
GOCs were promoting unqualified soldiers in the name of ethnic balance.
In the North, the northern leader, Sardauna, would not let Igbo
children go to public school. Igbo Union had to set up the Igbo Union
Schools. Immediately the coup of 1966 occurred, it was the BBC that
first began to call it an Igbo coup because majority of the coup
plotters were Igbo. In
Lagos, as soon as the crises began, Igbo
people were being taunted and beaten. They were being told: "Go Igbo,
go so that Garri will be chap. Go and stop trying to own every house
and every shop."</p>

<p>A man in three-piece wool suit in a plane with Olanna from
Kano to
Lagos who thinks Olanna is Yoruba captures this anti-Igbo sentiment thus:</p>

<p>"The
problem with Igbo people is that they want to control everything in
this country. Everything. Why can't they stay in the East? They own all
the shops; they control the civil service, even the police. If you are
arrested for any crime, as long s you say <em>keda</em>, they will let you go."</p>

<p>The
same intensity with which it portrays injustices against the Igbo is
also used to portray Igbo excesses as when Sardauna's death is mocked
with mmee-mmee-mmee bleating of a goat.</p>

<p>The
raggedness of the Biafran army is shown graphically openly. Yet, at the
end, it is the French ambassador who captures the feeling about the
gallant Biafran soldier when he is quoted to have said. "I was told
that
Biafra fought like heroes, but now I know that heroes fight like Biafrans." </p>

<p>As I
read the last word of HYS, I said to myself, Daddy can keep his story.
Mommy can keep her story of walking to a military base to identify
wounded Uncle of mine or being at the bedside when my grandfather died.
Uncle Joel who as Captain in
Biafra lost his finger to a flying bullet and
has some bullets still lodged in his body. He, too, can equally keep
his story. So should Uncle Festus who did not go to war because he is a
Jehovah Witness. I have read <em>Half of A Yellow Sun</em> and now I know. </p><br /><br><br><a target="_blank" href=http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10392><b>..Read the full article</b></a><br>

BiafranPrincess
Sep 26, 2008, 03:48 AM
At the 41st anniversary of the pogrom of 1966, I
wrote a short story I called The Blank Tape. It is a story of a video
tape in which frames of the pogrom were recorded ends up blank when
played ...Read the full article. (http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10392/55)


Thank you Mr Okonkwo. I absolutely adore Chimamanda. Anyi welu mmadu!
I loved, loved HYS for many obvious reasons and also for very salient ones;
- The vivid images of the the war(sad to say some scees are firmly lodged in my subconscious0
-The theme of empowerment through education as illustrated through Ugwu's character
-The theme of women empowerment by Aunty Ifeka, Olanna and her sis
-The story of a beautiful and rich history of intellectualism and principles
-Simple yet complicated love stories told with such poignancy they sound like beating hearts .................................There was nostalgia for what was and what could have been, pain for where we are yet hope for what is still possible.

Three cheers for Ms Adichie!!!!!!
-------------------------------

AMEN
Sep 26, 2008, 05:17 AM
@ Rudolf

Pls get ready for the backlash or silence from the spawns of the genocidalist nigerians.

great piece of write-up though

HE WHO IS SURROUNDED BY ENEMIES SHOULD NEVER SLEEP (IGBOS) !!!!!!

GOD BLESS
AMEN

godfather
Sep 26, 2008, 11:13 AM
That's a beautiful write-up! HYS is a classic.

aringaranso
Sep 26, 2008, 04:27 PM
"I was told that Biafra fought like heroes, but now I know that heroes fight like Biafrans."

What a quote!

Agidimolaja
Sep 27, 2008, 07:36 AM
Did Sir Ahmadu Bello, the Sardauna of Sokoto,the then Premier of the North prevent Igbo children from attending public schools? I doubt it much.

Was that in the entire Northern Nigeria or in a section of the North?

I went to school in the North while Sir Ahmadu Bello was the Premier and there wereIgbo children as my schoolmates and classmates.

As a very powerful Premier then, if he did not want Igbo kids to go to school,he could as well not allow Igbo Unions to establish private schools,afterall he is the Premier with executive power.

Lets be fair to Sir Ahmadu Bello for he did not do what you allegedhe did.

A book is now in the writing.I take it upon myself to write this book and state out several facts as facts are because of how severaluninformed and misguided Igbo people havemisplaced facts about events that led to the civil war,the civil war, howBiafralost the war, the blame games etc.

It makes me sad that on several instances when I read certain accounts of those events, I'm always confronted with misplaced facts and blame games and this article is not an exception.

That 'heroes fought like Biafrans" is quite laughable.

Lovenest
Sep 27, 2008, 08:03 AM
Did Sir Ahmadu Bello,the Sardauna of Sokoto, the then Premier of the North prevent Igbo children from attending public schools? I doubt it much.
Was that in the entire Northern Nigeria or in a section of the North?
I went to school in the North while Sir Ahmadu Bello was the Premier and there were Igbo children as my schoolmates and classmates.
As a very powerful Premier then,if he did not want Igbo kids to go to school, he could as well not allow Igbo Unions to establish private schools, afterall he is the Premier with executive power.
Lets be fair to Sir Ahmadu Bello for he did not do what you alleged he did.
A book is now in the writing. I take it upon myself to write this book and state out several facts as facts are because of how several uninformed and misguided Igbo people have misplaced facts about events that led to the civil war, the civil war,how Biafra lost the war,the blame games etc.
It makes me sad that on several instances when I read certain accounts of those events,I'm always confronted with misplaced facts and blame games and this article is not an exception.
That 'heroes fought like Biafrans" is quite laughable.




We are eargerly waiting for those facts as defined by "you" just as everyone has his own version of "truth". Please release the book, let us read your own "true" and perfect "facts"- Angel Gabriel.

Albany
Sep 27, 2008, 01:59 PM
@ Ogoo Okonkwo...


''The same intensity with which it portrays injustices against the Igbo is also used to portray Igbo excesses as when Sardauna's death is mocked with mmee-mmee-mmee bleating of a goat''.


I think that ''Mmee-mmee-mmee'' or ''Ntoo-ntoo-ntoo'' (depending on which part of Igboland one comes from), which is mostly used when someone (especially a naughty child that wouldn't listen) runs into trouble (and /or comes back to you in tears), simply means ''serves you right'' and not necessarily the bleating of a goat in the above context.

AMEN
Sep 27, 2008, 07:37 PM
@Agidimolaja,

Pls state some facts here on nvs for us before bringing out your book, you see your version of the saraduna stopping igbo school children almost carried water with me, then you made the comment that "biafrans fighting like heros is quite laughable", then i realised that you are here to spite us igbos, to insult, to justify with stealth the genocide against a people whose only crime was to be progressive in all endeavors and who were the only nigerian race at that time who collectively threatened western intrest in nigeria and africa as a whole.
<br><br>
Pls make those points here, because i can bet you $1000, that you have no book coming out, and if it did it will not break away from the fallacies already peddled by pro-nigerian genocide justifying press and intellingencia. So pls lets have a debate right here. <br><br>
People like you who carry hate, will live and have no peace in nigeria, because you people support evil for no reason, rawanda, burundi, dafur, uganda, congo etc all happended because nigeria and the world let 1966 holocaust happen, even major victor banjo a yoruba said to wole soyinka in 1967 that he felt disgusted by the silence in both the nigerian public and press to the pogrom against the igbo (the man died by wole soyinka).
But people like you in 2008 after 40yrs of northen feudal rule are yet to see the light, smell the coffee or even have an epiphany why? Because the primary focus of the nigerian is to kill the igbo. <br><br>
Yet nigeria that you justify burns every day, go to sahara reporters to see your presidents 13yrs old son flashing money while the rest suffer, yet you only have time to laught at igbos and their plight, what is this with you people?, pls in you reply tell us for once what we did wrong to you nigerians? It will help us to know why all the wickedness, we igbos still do not know why we are marked for extinction by you all, so pls explain to us, what is your problem, is the saraduna of sokoto your dad, is akintola your dad, is arthur unegbe your dad? <br><br>the niger bridge is about to collapse, pls focus on that and leave us alone, what is the difference between you and the nazis? Answer none as both of you are genocidalist in nature, pls get off the igbo bashing wagon, that is a bit tired now isnt it?, we dont rule naija any more do we? So what else do you want? Are we not not allowed to grieve for our dead?, is it a crime to cry over biafra, did biafra not protect us, did it not make sure there are igbos today for you to insult? Yes biafra worked for us as we are still here and not extinct as planned by you people, those who say we lost the war are those who lack critical thinking and psycho-analytical brain cell, and those who fail to interprete the history very well, and most nigerians fall into that category, but we dont care, we will be here for ever praise god for that fact. <br><br>
dont forget to answer my questions agidimolaja, do not mess about, dont beat around the bush, no insults either, keep it straight and clean ok<br><br>
God bless you and the igbos as well<br><br>
amen

Agidimolaja
Sep 29, 2008, 04:33 AM
Thank you Angel Gabriel Lovenest,

The book will be released when it is completed, I'm still writing

But mind you that writing a book is different from going to the store to pick up a loaf of bread, hopefully you would still be around if accident did not happen to you before then.

Facts cannot be denied!

Agidimolaja
Sep 29, 2008, 07:13 AM
Amen,



Fiftyseven men signed the document of USA's Declaration of Independence.A signature, so boldly signed more than any other one was by John Hancock.

When asked, why he signed his signature so boldly than any other signatory; rumour has it till today that he said,"so that the King of England will not need his reading glasses to read my sinature".



Amen, I also did not need the use of my reading glasses yesterday when I was reading the topsy-turvy you packaged in your response to my posting,especially the humour I ended it with.

It is a pity that you went up to the rooftop and started to bark so noisily and annoyingly. You screamed, you yelled, you cursed and you just became so irritating to everyone in his or her right mind.Poor you,big dog!

"That heroes fight like Biafrans is laughable" was what I wrote.It is my personal opinion and I have the right to it.

All that I expected of you was to be civilized enough to ask me for more clarifications about such opinion. Then would I have freely given to you what I mean, but you fouled out.

Do you see it nowwhat you have reduced yourself to, and how you carried yourself and exposed your gross primitivity by running here and there with no single substance in your long bunch of useless nonsense? Poor you!

My primary duty here now is to present facts that cannot be denied. I'm not here to debate you since this forum is not meant for debate but to exchange opinions and ideas.

It is of great importancethat I should take it upon myself to speak out against falsehoods because I dont want to be guilty of not speaking when I had the chance to do so.

For the sake of coming generations, I shall continue to contend with falsehood and see to it that it did not survive.If that is part of your annoyance, then this forum is not meant for you.

I tried to chip in whenever I smelled rat and it makes no difference to me who the person is,behe Igbo, Hausa, Edo etc , or my own Yoruba folks.If you have been reading my postings, you must have seen how I spared no error or misplaced facts no matter who presented it.

I criticized Gen Danjuma when he talked ill of late Gen Ironsi and Danjuma was my former GOC.I crticized Obj whenever the need arises and he is fellow Yoruba and also my former GOC.I confronted Dr. Layi Ajileye when he erred but his response was so refreshing as such that I now have so much respect for thehomegrown Yorubaman.I crticize Pastor Adeboye, a Yorubaman over his church's crowd that have been raising hell for commuters along Lagos-Ibadan Expwy.The list is long, go and check my postings to confirm my position.

This will show you that Igbos are not my prime targets on this website. My prime target is falsehood and misplacement of facts either knowingly or unknowingly.

The fact that I dislike certain Northern moslems and Islam does not mean that when falsehood is attached to Sir Ahmadu Bello I will then look the other way.If Papa Zik is misrepresented, I shall cry foul too and don't even attemptto lie about Papa Awo otherwise you would force me to scream at the top of my voice.

Therefore if my position is annoying to you, then this forum is not meant for you and your likes.

Amen, you lied! I'm therfore qualified to call you a liar. Pls agree so, for you are as indicated by your abominable package where you inserted that I hate Igbos.

No sir, I do not hate Igbos.I have Igbos as friends here,a lot of them, very decent Igbos. There are those we agreed on almost evrything and there are those that we have different opinions.

The beauty of itis that,differences of opinionalways give us something to talk about. Nevertheless, we are friends so also are our wives.Come to me in Texas and lightupyour dark mind.

Do you know who hate Igbos? The answer is - Igbos themselves!

I needed not talk about the events of 1966 -1970 with you. Probably you were not even born then and all that you are now carrying around in your muddy head are falsehoods as planted therein by thoseuninformed and misguided Igbos.

The fact that certain uninformed Igbos as well as misguided ones like you are still transporting falsehoods here and there is one of the reasons why I finally resolved to write a book of facts.

It may as well intrest you to hear that some of my Igbo friends were among those who have been urging me to do so. The book is already in the writing now where facts about Nigeria political history, events before and after the coups and civil waritself shall be laid down side by side along with various falsehoods that the likes of you have been so forcefully spoon-fed with.People will be opportuned to seprate truth from falsehood,

I need not bet with you for $1, 000 over it. If you are that broke and in need of money, I can help you though.Just pray that you shall be among those that will read it.

Since you already fouled out, I no longer owe you any explanation as to what I mean by "Heroes, fight like Biafrans?That is laughable!"

But I shall like to drum it into your heavy ears that I was a combatant in the civil war and that I fought against Biafran forces and that I know so much about them including their strenghts and weaknesses.

I will therefore leave you in the wilderness to be roaming around till Thy Kingdom come, Amen!

okenikpoto
Sep 29, 2008, 05:55 PM
Great job Bru, simply straight from the heart.

Lovenest
Sep 29, 2008, 09:12 PM
Thank you Angel Gabriel Lovenest,
The book will be released when it is completed,I'm still writing
But mind you that writing a book is different from going to the store to pick up a loaf of bread,hopefully you would still be around if accident did not happen to you before then.
Facts cannot be denied!


I return your threat of accident to me back to you in Jesus name. If it is your portion in life, it is not my portion in the ever mighty name of Jesus. I rebuke it and return it to you. I cancel it in the name of Jesus. May God have mercy on you.

AMEN
Sep 29, 2008, 11:09 PM
@ agidimolaja,

as expected you have found all the excuses in the world not to answer my direct questions, rather you use the same cliche oyibo racist use all the time when caught out in their racism, that is "i have black friends, my cousin is married to a black etc", in your case you have igbo friends as you claim so i guess that means you are not genocidalist towards the igbo, and hence can say what you like about us eh, sorry but you are not allowed.

1.so you fought the igbo during the war eh, what made you do so.
2.how many of our civilians did you kill?
3.do you share your killing spree adventures freely with your igbo friends
4.why wont you answer my questions, oh i forgot you said i fouled out referee.
5. I was born after the war, so does that disqualify me from asking questions about the most brutal part of my people's history
6. Yes i can also criticise ojukwu if he messes up, and in the same stroke hate the yoruba etc, so whats your point.
7. What makes you think falsehood was planted in my head by igbos, i have been in the uk since the age of 22 and only researched biafra abroad, it is rarely discussed among the igbo at home, so exactly which igbos are you talking about, the books and web sites i check are multi racial and ethnic.
8. Dont be mad i outed you as an igbo hater, i hope your igbo freinds one day see you for who you really are, after all the holocaust on them on 29 sept 1966 (today is the anniversary, god bless thier souls. Rip my innocent people.), was done by people they lived side by side with for many years, so how are you any different from those people.
9. Pls stop the emotional out pour and answer the questions, i know you cant debate me, on 1966-1970, i guarrantee you lose hands down to me, and i boast here.

God bless you (rip igbos who died in the 29 sept 1966 holocaust, may GOD almighty judge your murderers and rapist, and those who disembowled our pregnant women and those who raped our babies all over nigeria).

Amen

emenanjo
Sep 30, 2008, 03:59 PM
@ agidimolaja,

as expected you have found all the excuses in the world not to answer my direct questions, rather you use the same cliche oyibo racist use all the time when caught out in their racism, that is "i have black friends, my cousin is married to a black etc", in your case you have igbo friends as you claim so i guess that means you are not genocidalist towards the igbo, and hence can say what you like about us eh, sorry but you are not allowed.

1.so you fought the igbo during the war eh, what made you do so.
2.how many of our civilians did you kill?
3.do you share your killing spree adventures freely with your igbo friends
4.why wont you answer my questions, oh i forgot you said i fouled out referee.
5. I was born after the war, so does that disqualify me from asking questions about the most brutal part of my people's history
6. Yes i can also criticise ojukwu if he messes up, and in the same stroke hate the yoruba etc, so whats your point.
7. What makes you think falsehood was planted in my head by igbos, i have been in the uk since the age of 22 and only researched biafra abroad, it is rarely discussed among the igbo at home, so exactly which igbos are you talking about, the books and web sites i check are multi racial and ethnic.
8. Dont be mad i outed you as an igbo hater, i hope your igbo freinds one day see you for who you really are, after all the holocaust on them on 29 sept 1966 (today is the anniversary, god bless thier souls. Rip my innocent people.), was done by people they lived side by side with for many years, so how are you any different from those people.
9. Pls stop the emotional out pour and answer the questions, i know you cant debate me, on 1966-1970, i guarrantee you lose hands down to me, and i boast here.

God bless you (rip igbos who died in the 29 sept 1966 holocaust, may GOD almighty judge your murderers and rapist, and those who disembowled our pregnant women and those who raped our babies all over nigeria).

Amen



I have noticed that this agidimolaja is an 'expert' in this Biafran/Nigerian civil war. I am waiting anxiously for that his book of reverred "facts". So after fighting the war, you migrated to a better country-the USA, to go and hide? I thought you should have stayed to help build the country to an acceptable standard with your commanding officer during the war, T.Y. Danjuma, and IBB.

Igbos may be their own enamies but what about the Yorubas? What is "wetie"? Akintola versus Awolowo saga and the exchange of blows and the throwing of chairs in western house of assembly? who where the major enamies of June 12? What happened to Bola Ige and the political assassinations in Lagos and Ekiti? The Omoboriowo 1983 saga and riots was caused by who?

I have been reading a lot of disturbing articles from former army officers on the NVS and have been going through comments to read your own 'facts' and 'unbiased' comments on those articles, at least as a former very experienced soldier but there was no posting from you. Perhaps what Olaide Omideyi and one Chukwura have writien are the real facts, and I happy that Olaide left an unprogressive army to go and better his lot.

Let me hazard a guess on why you fled the country to the USA. You were tired of the shenanigans of the Hausa/Fulani soldiers and just like Adekunle and Akinrinade, who have regretted fighting the Igbos, you were frustrated out of the Northern Army called the Nigerian Army. Or, are you our Defence attache at the Nigeria embassy in New York, if you are, I better drop my pen before.......Fela's unknown soja, unknown sojaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa strikes with a 'gidim-gwom'! He laughs ha ha ha!

Anyway, I want tell you too that I was frustrated out of one of the paramilitary outfits in Nigeria before 'I borrow Leg' and ran like Ben Johnson to Obodo -oyibo. please join Bode Eluyera in his crusade for an Oodua republic, that Country is too big. We need to split it to manageable size or convoke a soveriegn national conference to decide where that country is headed to. For now oga sir, I await the publication and luanching of your book. Cheers and God bless.

Robot
Oct 16, 2008, 12:40 AM
The raggedness of the Biafran army is shown graphically openly. Yet, at the end, it is the French ambassador who captures the feeling about the gallant Biafran soldier when he is quoted to have said. ...Read the full article. (http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10392)

GamineGirlie
Oct 22, 2008, 03:12 AM
Finally read the book.

I laughed:lol:

I cried:cry:

IT was bittersweet,

yet my younger sister was pointing out grammatically errors in the book to me.:rolleyes:

katampe
Oct 23, 2008, 05:52 PM
appears you have a finicky sibling, were you both reading the book at the same time? Did the book advance your knowledge in anyway or affect the way you now see the world?


Finally read the book.

I laughed:lol:

I cried:cry:

IT was bittersweet,

yet my younger sister was pointing out grammatically errors in the book to me.:rolleyes:

GamineGirlie
Nov 13, 2008, 11:18 AM
It made me understand or see why the Igbos sometimes act the way they do and i appreciate alot about them now. My sister read the book after i did, shes 8yrs younger, to be pardoned? Maybe.