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Alata
Jun 3, 2008, 04:00 PM
There is a revival of research interest in the sciences and spiritual powers of the peoples forced out of KMT (ancient Egypt) by successive invading forces. A perspective that can benefit from further study is posted below. The original is by a Santeria practitioner at: Yoruba & Egypt (http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=88420151&blogID=257081266)

caution: VERY LONG POST.

Ifa/Ancient Egypt Calendar 07

1/14 to 1/16 (A 2/24 to 2/26): Raising Heaven--Old Egyptian Festival honoring the unseen Neteru Amen and Amenet. Egyptians perceived the many Gods and Goddesses (Neteru) to be aspects of the one God-Goddess Neter-Neteret. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar

2/24 to 2/26] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Rekehwer day 30 to Rekehnedjes day 2]

1/15 (A 2/25): Beginning of Old Egyptian Proyet/Emergence month of Rekehnedjes/Phamenoth. Priests and priestesses read hymns of praise to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses).[Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 2/25] Ancient Egyptian calendar: Rekehnedjes day 1

1/15 (A 2/25): Old Egyptian feast of Neter Ptah, God who inspires creativity and the arts. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 2/25] Ancient Egyptian calendar: Rekehnedjes day 1

1/17: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Ogun, Orisha of Strength, Endurance, and Perseverance.


2/2: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Oya, Orisha of Death and Rebirth. Yorubas/Santeros believe the Orishas are emanations and messengers of the one Deity, Olodumare.

2/5 to 2/6: Feast of Old Romano-Egyptian Goddess Isis, the Healer--recalls Set (God of Challenges and Chaos) poisoning child God Horus, and Isis intervening, defeating Set, and healing Horus. [Roman calendar]

2/14 (A 3/27): Beginning of Old Egyptian Proyet/Emergence month of Paenrenenutet/Pharmouthi, dedicated to Neteret Renenutet and Neter Nepri. [Priests and priestesses made offerings of food and drink to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses) to ensure that all people had abundant food and drink.] [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 3/27] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Paenrenenutet day 1]

2/17 to 2/18 (A 3/30 to 3/31): Old Egyptian festival of Neteret Bastet, Cat Goddess who fosters domestic harmony. Her image was transported outside the temple on a bark. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 3/30 to 3/31] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Paenrenenutet days 4-5]

3/5: Navigium Isidis--Old Romano-Egyptian festival honoring Goddess Isis as Lady of the Moon and Ruler of the Sea; celebrated with the launching of a boat of offerings. [Roman calendar]

3/10 to 3/16 (A 4/20 to 4/26): Old Egyptian festival of Neteret Renenutet (Goddess of the Harvest) and Neter Nepri (God of Grain). A harvest offering was made. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 4/20 to 4/26] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Paenrenenutet day 25 to Paenkhons day 1]

3/16 (A 4/26): Beginning of Old Egyptian Shomu/Harvest month of Paenkhons/Pakhon. [Priests and priestesses made offerings of incense, holy water, and perfumed oils to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses).] [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 4/26] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Paenkhons day 1]

3/19: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Osanyin, Orisha of Deciduous Vegetation.

3/25: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Oshun, Orisha of Passion and Fertility.

4/15 (A 5/26): Beginning of Old Egyptian Shomu/Harvest month of Khentkhety/Paoni. [Priests and priestesses made offerings to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses) to ensure that there would be good health and long life for all.] [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 5/26] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Khentkhety day 1]

4/23: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Ogun, Orisha of Self-reliance and Industrious Labor. Yorubas/Santeros celebrate with drumming, ecstatic dancing, and possession trance.
5/15 (A 6/25): Beginning of Old Egyptian Shomu/Harvest month of Ipet-hemet/Epip. [Priests and priestesses made offerings to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses) to ensure that there would be love and happiness for all.] [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 6/25] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Ipet-hemet day 1]

5/15: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Ochossi, Orisha of Animals.

5/29 (A 7/9): Old Egyptian festival of Neteru Amen (God of transcendent powers) and Hapi (God of the Nile River); offerings were made to ensure the needed flooding of the Nile River. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 7/9] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Ipet-hemet day 15]

6/13 (A 7/24): Old Egyptian feast of Neteret Hathor, Goddess of Love and Fertility. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 7/24] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Ipet-hemet day 30]

6/14 (A 7/25): Beginning of Old Egyptian Shomu/Harvest month of Mesut-Ra/Mesori, dedicated to Neteru Ra and Rait. [Priests and priestesses made offerings to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses) to ensure that there would be security and protection for all.] [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 7/25] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Mesut-Ra day 1]

6/21: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Orisha Babalu Aye, Guardian of the Disabled.

6/29: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Orisha Eleggua, Intercessor and Ruler of Destinies. Yorubas/Santeros celebrate with divination and food offerings.

7/14 (A 8/24): Old Egyptian birthday feast of Neter Osiris - partner and true love of Isis, and father of Horus; guide of all husbands, fathers, and judges. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 8/24] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Epagomenal day 1]

7/15 (A 8/25): Old Egyptian birthday feast of Neter Horus the Elder, lover of Neteret Hathor. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 8/25] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Epagomenal day 2]

7/16 (A 8/26): Old Egyptian birthday feast of Neter Set, God of the Desert. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 8/26] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Epagomenal day 3]

7/17 (A 8/27): Old Egyptian birthday feast of Neteret Isis - partner and true love of Osiris, and mother of Horus; guide of all wives, mothers, healers, advocates, and teachers. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 8/27] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Epagomenal day 4]

7/18 (A 8/28): Old Egyptian birthday feast of Neteret Nepthys, estranged wife of Neter Set. [Kemetic calendar] [Alexandrian calendar 8/28] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Epagomenal day 5]

7/20 (A 8/30): Old Egyptian birthday feast of Neter Ra and Rait, Deities of the Sun. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 8/30 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Tekh day 1]

7/20 to 8/2 (A 8/30 to 9/12): Old Egyptian festival marking the return to Egypt of Neteret Isis (as the star of Septet/Sirius), Neter Osiris (as the star of Sahu/Orion), and the rains that inundate the Nile River. [Old Egyptian New Year; beginning of Akhet/Inundation month of Tekh/Thout, dedicated to Neter Thoth (God of Time).] [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 8/30 to 9/12 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Tekh days 1-14] [9/12 is also the Coptic New Year (leap year).] [The leap year is the year encompassing the Gregorian leap year day.]

8/3 (A 9/13): Old Egyptian festival of Neteru Amen (God of transcendent powers) and Hapi (God of the Nile River); offerings were made to ensure the needed flooding of the Nile River. [Kemetic calendar(leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 9/13 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Tekh day 15]

8/6 to 8/7 (A 9/16 to 9/17): Old Egyptian Wag Festival, honoring the dead and Neter Osiris (Lord of Amenta, realm of the dead). Food was brought to the tombs and shared with the dead. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 9/16 to 9/17 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Tekh days 18-19]

8/7 to 8/8 (A 9/17 to 9/18): Old Egyptian festival of Neter Thoth, God of Knowledge and Wisdom. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 9/17 to 9/18 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Tekh days 19-20]

8/10 (A 9/20): Old Egyptian Great Procession of Neter Osiris. The image of Osiris was transported on a bark to the tombs. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 9/20 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Tekh day 22]

8/19 (A 9/29): Beginning of Old Egyptian Akhet/Inundation month of Menkhet/Paopi, dedicated to Neteru Amen-Ra-Atem and Amenet-Rait-Mut. [Priests and priestesses made offerings to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses) to ensure that there would be strength and freedom for all.] [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 9/29 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Menkhet day 1]

9/2 to 9/12 (A 10/13 to 10/23): Old Egyptian Opet Festival, honoring Neteru Amen-Ra-Atem and Amenet-Rait-Mut. The pharaoh went to the Luxor Temple at Thebes in order to have his authority to rule recognized. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 10/13 to 10/23 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Menkhet days 15-25]

9/8: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Oshun, Orisha of Love and Compassion.

9/18 (A 10/29): Beginning of Old Egyptian Akhet/Inundation month of Het-Hert/Athor, dedicated to Neteret Hathor. [Priests and priestesses danced and played sistra, tambourines, and menat in honor of the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses).] [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 10/29 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Het-Hert day 1]

9/24: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Obatala, Orisha of Peace and Justice. [Yorubas/Santeros worship the One Deity Olodumare.]

9/26 (A 11/6): Old Egyptian festival of Neter Amen-Ra-Atem, the Great God, and Neteret Amenet-Rait-Mut, the Great Goddess. Their images were transported on a bark from Karnak to Luxor. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 11/6 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Het-Hert day 9]

9/29: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Orisha Eleggua, Intercessor and Ruler of Destinies.

9/30: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Shango, Orisha of Passion and Virility.

10/4: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Orunmila, Orisha of Wise Counsel and Protection.

10/18 (A 11/28): Beginning of Old Egyptian Akhet/Inundation month of Nehebkau/Khoiak, dedicated to Neteru Isis and Osiris. [Priests and priestesses read hymns of thanksgiving to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses).] [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 11/28 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Nehebkau day 1]

10/18 (A 11/28): Old Egyptian feast of Neteret Hathor, Goddess of Fate. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 11/28 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Nehebkau day 1]

10/24: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Orisha Erinle, Healer of the Sick and Injured.

10/28 to 11/3: Isia--Old Romano-Egyptian festival recalling Set (God of Destruction) killing God Osiris; Goddess Isis mourning Him, resurrecting Him, and conceiving God Horus with Him; and Osiris becoming Lord of Amenta, realm of the dead. [He weighs souls against the Feather of Truth on Goddess Maat's Scale of Justice, but defers to Isis for those who fail the test.] [Roman calendar]

10/29 to 11/16 (A 12/9 to 12/27): Old Egyptian Sokar Festival/Khoiak Ceremonies. It commemorates Neteret Isis seeking out and finding the scattered remains of Neter Osiris. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 12/9 to 12/27 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Nehebkau days 12-30]

11/1 to 11/2: Fon/Vodou feast of Ghede, Loa of the Dead; time for honoring ancestral spirits. Fon/Vodouisants believe all Loas (Deities) originate from Co-Creators Goddess-God Mawu- Lisa.

11/17 (A 12/28): Beginning of Old Egyptian Proyet/Emergence month of Shefbedet/Tobi. [Priests and priestesses made offerings to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses) to ensure that there would be peace and harmony throughout the land.] [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 12/28 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Shefbedet day 1]

11/25: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Oya, Orisha of Death and Rebirth.

12/4: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Orisha Shango, Defender Against Evil.

12/15 (A 1/25): Old Egyptian festival of Neteret Bastet, Cat Goddess who fosters domestic harmony. Her image was transported on a bark on the Nile River from Karnak to Bubastis. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 1/25 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Shefbedet day 29]

12/16 (A 1/26): Old Egyptian festival of Neteret Amenet-Rait-Mut, the primordial Great Mother. Her image was transported on a bark on Isheru Lake with other Lion Goddesses. [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 1/26 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Shefbedet day 30]

12/17 (A 1/27): Beginning of Old Egyptian Proyet/Emergence month of Rekehwer/Mekhir. [Priests and priestesses made offerings to the Neteru (Gods and Goddesses) to ensure the continuation of order (maat) and life (ankh).] [The Negative Confessions reflect the ethics of the Egyptians.] [Kemetic calendar (leap year)] [Alexandrian calendar 1/27 (leap year)] [Ancient Egyptian calendar: Rekehwer day 1]

12/17: Yoruba/Santeria feast of Orisha Babalu Aye, Healer of Deadly Diseases.

12/21 to 12/25: Old Romano-Egyptian festival of Goddess Isis giving birth to God Horus. [Roman calendar]

12/26 to 1/1: Kwanzaa--Festival celebrating positive African traditions; emphasizes unity, self- determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith.

12/31: Yoruba/Santeria festival of Orisha Yemaya, Mother of the Sun and Moon.

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The ancient Egyptian religion was practiced throughout East Africa (in Sudan, Ethiopia, and Eritrea as well as Egypt). Some Old Egyptian holidays (Kemetic holidays) in this calendar are based on the ancient Roman calendar. Other Old Egyptian holidays are based on the ancient Egyptian calendar. The ancient Egyptians used 3 calendars: a lunar calendar, a fixed calendar, and a lunisolar calendar. The Old Egyptian New Year is disputed. The Alexandrian calendar (a reform of the ancient Egyptian calendar by Roman Emperor Augustus in 25 BCE that added a 6th leap year day) sets the Old Egyptian New Year at 8/29 (except years encompassing the Gregorian leap year day, when the New Year is on 8/30). The Alexandrian calendar is the same as the Coptic calendar (a Julian-type calendar), but the Alexandrian dates are adjusted to the Gregorian calendar. (The Coptic New Year is on 9/11, except years encompassing the Gregorian leap year day, when the New Year is on 9/12.) The New Year was celebrated in ancient times at the time of the annual life-giving inundation of the Nile River. The annual inundation occurs around 7/19 on the Gregorian calendar. Consequently, the Kemetic calendar sets the Old Egyptian New Year at 7/19. The Copts and the Arabs of Egypt celebrated "The Night of the Drop" on 7/17 into the 19th Century. This first drop presaged the coming inundation. It was believed that the drop was a tear drop that Goddess Isis cried in mourning over the death of God Osiris. Her tears were believed to cause the annual flooding of the Nile. In previous years, ancient Egyptian dates were calculated based on the Alexandrian calendar, with secondary reference to Kemetic calendar dates. Beginning with 2005, ancient Egyptian dates are calculated based on the earlier Kemetic calendar, with secondary reference to Alexandrian calendar dates. Roman calendar dates will not change.

This is one of many versions of the Egyptian Negative Confession. The dead were required to recite this in order to be judged fit to enter Amenta, the realm of the dead: I have not harmed anyone; I have not wronged my kinfolk; I have not committed evil; I have not consorted with evil people; I have not committed acts of abomination; I have not done less than duty requires; I have not attempted to gain undeserved honors; I have not oppressed anyone; I have not treated any Deity with disrespect; I have not defrauded anyone; I have not done what the Deities detest; I have not caused anyone to oppress another; I have not caused anyone to suffer; I have not allowed anyone to go hungry; I have not caused anyone to weep; I have not killed anyone; I have not caused anyone to be killed; I have not caused pain to the multitude; I have not taken offerings intended for the temple; I have not taken food meant for the Deities; I have not taken food meant for the spirits; I have not consorted with pedophiles; I have not entered the temple in an impure state; I have not cheated in the measuring of grain; I have not encroached upon the fields of others; I have not taken the land of others; I have not added to the weight of the balance; I have not cheated with the pointer of the scales; I have not taken milk from babies; I have not driven animals from their pastures; I have not captured geese from the preserves of a Deity; I have not caught fish with fish bait; I have not obstructed water that should run; I have not broken a canal of running water; I have not neglected to make temple offerings; I have not taken cattle from the property of a Deity; I have not rejected the Deities in their manifestations. I am pure. I am pure. I am pure. I am pure. [Egyptian Book of the Dead Chapter CXXVI]
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Yoruba World Exploration And The Loss Of Dynasties
By Farouk Martins, Omo Aresa

The ancient Yoruba were one of the most accommodating and the most adventurous people on earth. They were the explorers who went beyond their surroundings. They were the traders who exchanged goods and services. They were the Aromires (sea friendly admirals) and the Olokos (boat owners) who went on 12 months voyage by Irawo-oko (canoe-star), ships, as elephant warriors and priests. They traveled north and south of the Nile, Mesopotamia, from one coast to another, to Asia, Australia and the Americas. Africans were known in Americas before Columbus: Washita in Mississippi Valley 6000 B.C, the Caribs of the West Indies. We all agreed that mankind started from Africa, see Dr. Spencer Wells research on Y and X chromosomes, but vacillated on the spread of civilization.

The Yoruba left marks by spreading their genes, arts, sciences, culture and religion. They are born out by ancient artistic stone monoliths dated before Christ and later by terracotta, underground drainage system and cabinet form of government. Thanks to archeology, arts, sciences and devoted scholars that are still unraveling these past accomplishments. The history of the Yoruba before present era (BC) and their cousins can be told intelligently even by what we know now.

Iwo Eleru, around 10,000 B.C, has confirmed the Yoruba civilization, religion and spread from Ife to other Yoruba cities in spite of preservation problem in the rain forest. One has to put this excavation in proper perspective:
Iwo Eleru, Nubian culture around…………………10,000 B.C
Indian culture ………………… 6,000 B.C
Mesopotamia culture ………………... 3,500 B.C
China culture …………………3,000 – 2,200 B.C
Malanesia and South Pacific Hawaii …………….. 2,000 B.C
Olmec Mexico …………….. 1,100 B.C
Some have always wondered why Yoruba wrote on people's arm and body and devised systematic numbers by tens, twenty and hundred but restricted them to a few who could read and write. These marks, tattoos, and symbols are still shared with the Sudanese. Esusu (susu) economics is still shared all over the black world. A book, Edidi, brought back to IFE by Oduduwa on his sojourns on the Nile Valley can still not be interpreted?

Many Yoruba do not know where the name came from. Every Ethnic group in Nigeria (their cousins) has taken that advantage to interpret the name, Yoruba. Even before they came in contact with one another, in the recent past.

Combination of OYO and OBA gives YORUBA: O YO-OBA, O YO-ROBA,
O YO-RUBA

These were words that were taken from different orikis in Yoruba that we hardly connected together. There is no need to look outside the language itself for where Yoruba name came from. "Omo Karo o jire" (Good morning) is understood by most Yoruba, from Lagos to Sierra Leone, Cuba, Brazil, and Americas. Yet, there are some who have lost it and even deny their own identities. Mixed Africans in Europe, Asia, Australia, America and Africa refer to their white blood. Some with skin darker than charcoal, ignore the contradiction of one drop (of black blood) rule.

My own name is so foreign, one has to be familiar with Lagosians to know that I am a Yoruba. One important identity that my family has, as all Yoruba including those in foreign lands, is oriki. It takes me back home to Enu Owa in Isale Eko and Popo Aguda in Lagos. I will leave it as "Omo Aresa." Aresa was a royal house in the old Oyo. Governor Glover built Martins Street to honor my great grandfather, Adebayo Ojo Martins, with his tombstone which was later moved to Ita Akanni. My grandmother was the head of Ojora Adejiyan ruling house before she died in 1979. No mystery in Ife-Oyo-Lagos original connection. So, please understand my biases. Yes, I am the same person who refused to join Yoruba organizations in the seventies, because I am a NIGERIAN! I can be a proud Yoruba and a Nigerian, without any conflict.

ILE IFE has been the ancestral home of Yoruba and most of their history began from there. It is the religious, spiritual and artistic home. There are important people revered by the Yorubas who marked critical landmarks in the history. Some are even delegated as messenger of Olorun (God).

Olorun the only God, has always been the belief of the Yoruba before Christianity and Islam. He created mankind through Orunmila, keeper of Ifa oracle. The point of this paper is not to deal with myth or gospel of the Bible, Koran, Torah or Ifa. The rift between evolution and creation is very strong regarding what to teach in elementary school, not only among parents in the United States but in other countries including Nigeria. This paper will depend on scientific facts and reasonable oral history.

There were generations in between the heroes or icons the Yoruba revered in history. So there were Obatala, Moremi, Oduduwa, Okanbi, Oranmiyan, Sango and others. These generation gaps can be born out by the time difference between Orunmila and Obatala. It has been postulated that there were ninety rulers before Obatala. Assuming that Olorun created Orunmila from the beginning. That is, before or around the Bible time of Adam and Eve. Obatala came after ninety rulers, he must have been around way before Christ.

Most Yoruba will agree that Awolowo was the most recent icon, popularly called the son of Oduduwas, regardless of the generation gap between them. Others may regard Herbert Macauley, Jubril Martins, Adelabu Adegoke, S.L. Akintola, Adekunle Ajasin, H.O Davies etc as the heroes of Awolowo's time. They were all Yoruba of significant achievements.

Obatala's work was never completed, not because he got drunk or big headed as oral history told us. But each of these icons advanced the cause and the civilization of the Yoruba to the next level. Who took the banner from Orunmila before it got to Obatala or whoever takes it from Awolowo from now on will be remembered in history as the son or daughter of Obatala, Moremi, Oduduwa or Awolowo.

Moremi was a very brave woman who saved the Yoruba from midnight marauders. In the midnight hour, the marauders came from bush (igbo) to pester the Yoruba, they fell in love with a beautiful woman who revealed their strategies and saved the Yorubas. Some Igbos figured they were the ones because the spelling matched. Even if they were, they were cousins in the rain forest at an earlier point in time.

However, Oba Mafimisebi, the Olugbo of Ugbo in Ilaje claimed they were the aboriginal Yoruba that was displaced from Ife. He and Oba of Benin agreed up to this point. Olugbo claimed this is why Ugbo and Benin have similar chieftaincy titles: Lema, Ashogbon, Oliha, Ojomo, Yasere among others. They were the Obalufon, Obamakin, Obalufe, Obawinrin, etc whose Yoruba language were originally spoken, including the lingua fraca in Benin palace. Did Ugbo produce the 90 rulers before Obatala?

Some wonder about how many centuries Oduduwa lived. He was mentioned from the time of Obatala to the time of Okanbi, the father or grand father of Oranmiyan. Oduduwa did not exist after Christ. It was his spirit, greatness and stories that lived centuries after.

Oduduwa must have been here before Christ, going by parallel archeology of the Yoruba, Egypt, Greece and Rome with the history in the Bible or the Koran. Unless those before him were many centuries old before he was born! He traveled through the Nile valley, spread Yoruba civilization and religion. Yoruba, named in Arabic writing, were noted for their religion, before their present country brothers became aware of them. See Beginning of Ethnic Formation. During Oduduwa's exploration, he had children Yoruba usually name AdeTokunbo, Omowale, Magbagbeile and others overseas. He was revered because his descendants were kingdom builders and they also unified the Yorubas. Oduduwa proved his Ife royal blood to Agboniregun or Setilu in care of Ifa oracle by displaying his crown, a book in verses and an obelisk. Zo Giwa mentioned these three items in his article in case any dynasty had missed them.

Okanbi, one of Oduduwa's descendants, may be some generations from him. It was Okanbi children or grandchildren that built empires and further united the Yoruba with their neighbors. Oduduwa descendants met civilization in Ife and propagated it but might have started empire and kingdom formation during their sojourns on the Nile River.

Civilization has a very simple meaning but today it has exotic attachment for self gratification. It is the ability of people to live amicably among one another. It is not modernization, invention of weapon of mass destruction or the ability to destroy the world in a second. The Yoruba were farmers who had enough to eat and drink because they lived on fertile soil in the rain forest and might have changed locations to take advantage of fertile environment. See Professor Ade Obayemi about eight locations of Ife. This gave the Yoruba the time to think, reflect, engage in Arts, build, organize a civilize community and practice their religion that was known through out Africa in ancient time. Those looking for solutions, predictions, cures, wisdom, artists and rulers went to Ife.

Oranmiyan, one of the grandsons of Okanbi became the founder of Oyo and Benin Empires. He was the one who wanted to go back to the Nile Valley on his return from Benin to avenge those who kicked Oduduwa out. The history of Egypt and Nubia was that of changing rulers. Rulers (Oduduwa) returned home (Ife) whenever another power took over, in Nubia (Sudan). Ti ewure ba je lo, a pada wa sile o. Explorer must return home.
Akhenaton who preached one God in Egypt, like the Yoruba was also sent packing southwards, where he had contacted his Nubian belief. Most of his records were destroyed in Egypt for so daring.

I have to emphasize a point Professors Onigun Otite and Jide Osuntokun made many times. Dynasty and the people may not necessarily be the same. In the case of Benin, there were Ogisos rulers before the Obas came. The Benin Empire and influence came under the Obas. It is this influence that was developed by the descendants of Oba and Ogiso which grew from the 13th century. This remarkable much later achievement, rivaled their Yoruba predecessor, but presented no conflict with Ife. Some have speculated that the transition from Ogiso to Oba was not so peaceful, autochthonous chiefs undermined Eweka's authority. Up till today, the land is leased from the Ogiso descendants during the crowning ceremony of Oba to dampen the rivalry between the two dynasties. This rivalry, is still in the folklore and still generate some hard feelings.

Another landmark figure was Shango, the Alafin of Oyo whose mother was Tapa. He was credited with creating gun powder from kola nuts. After his death, he became a demigod.
He was well known beyond Africa and stories were told about Oba Koso. Pedral quoted Morie's work in Coptic text in 1666 - "Obba Kousso" as he was known, was King Shango and a king of Kush who ruled north and west of Africa but was born in Ife. Morie had no idea where Ife was, but Pedral compared his love life and that of Amon (Kham) and Mount. He also noted the names between Deedan and Dada etc.


IFE has been studied extensively by foreigners and less by Nigerians. This is a culture that has been nearly highjacked and labeled the work of whites or black whites. Strange! Professor Wole Soyinka noted the irony in the words of the German scholar, Leo Frobenious, looking at the Yoruba chiefs at Ile Ife, wondering if they were the descendant of the lost civilization of Atlantis. Sir Flinder Petrie, world renowned archeologist noted the similarity between terracotta head of Ife and that in Memphis. Osun staff is a serpentine staff crowned by bird carried by initiates of Obatala, it is the same medical symbol of Caduceus.

Africans scholars like Professors Peter Ekeh, Cheikh Diop, Frank Snowden, Dr. W.E.D DuBois, Marcus Garvey and John D. Balwin e.t.c worked tirelessly to prove that Egypt was and is in Africa. This may sound strange to a student new in the field, but a paper such as this can not do justice to their work. Anyone interested must pursue their work.


In Egypt we see evidence of earlier civilization of the blacks from Sudan of today (Nubia), Iwo Eleru 10 B.C, Nok culture, Ife stone, terracotta and language known before Christ (B.C), Igbo Ukwu 10th A.D, Sugbon Eredo, old Oyo walls, Benin Iya ditch, the Great Zimbabwe. There were the Wolof, Mendes, Akhan. The Shaka Zulu, and the 16th century Queen Nzinga of Angola who fought against slave trade. An objective scholar would see replica of these cultures reproduced in Egypt, but not those who wanted to claim Egypt for the white race. Indeed, those who painted black civilization white are still working at it vigorously.

African travel by boat or ship has been demonstrated by the sophisticated construction of Dafuna Canoe recently excavated near River Yobe dated 8,000 years old while the oldest boat in Egypt is 5,000 years old.

Nazlet Kater, an African skull, the oldest human found in Luxor in 1980 is about 35,000 years old. There were also other white scholars who had made observation of the Egyptians as blacks. Greek historian Diodorus Siculus of Sicily, 1st century B.C, credited the Ethiopians (blacks) as the first of all men created by the gods and founders of civilization and religion in Egypt imported to Greece. Greek philosopher, Aristotle 384-322 B.C.E described the Ethiopians and the Egyptians as blacks. Greek writer Lucian 125 B.C, described the Egyptians with African features. The father of History, Herodotus 490-425 B.C.E, describe the City of Meroe, religion, food, valuable metals, burial ceremony, elephants, offerings (ebo), and the scarification marks on their forehead . Their first God was Min (Emi Mimo) and that the Greek gods came from Egypt. French writer Constantin-Francois Volney 1757-1820, claimed that Ethiopians were the first to attain civilized way of life and worship.

All burial drawings in Egypt showed African features. It is only Africans who knows what it means to put hands on the head during these burial ceremonies.

Those who have watched the Zar ritual dance conducted by special women among Fellahin in Egypt saw the replica of Yoruba dance during worship or Haitian Voodoo dance. But if you ask them or tell them, some may not realize their identity. The Belady who were the original black settlers of Egypt have been oppressed by different powers but still hang on to the African tradition which is different from that of those who rule them. The culture remains with them. See Gamal Nkrumah writings on the Bedja.

It took Arab unified soldiers to claim back Iraq from the Africans. They were noted as sharp arrow shooter of the eye and were called upon to defeat opposing army. There are still mistrust and hostility between Arabs and Africans up to the present day. Yet, some of us including me have Arabic names. The hostility and misadventure we still see in Danfur today. What an irony that some of us kill one another in Nigeria over imported religions. The whole world is watching African leaders.

The Fellahins, the real Pharaohs, still have melanin in their skin layers, their genes are related to Africans, still carry the sickle cell trait, practice circumcision and totemism. X-ray on Pharaohs done by James E. Harris of Michigan University proved the same, black. Egyptian Arts, Religion, Oracle and the original language of the Beladi mirror that of Africans in general and Yoruba in particular. The work of Dr. Lucas has been quoted many times.

These similarities between Egypt, Sudan, Yoruba and other African cousins are not coincidence. It establishes the rightful place of African civilization. The Yoruba civilization has been studied extensively because of their ancient way of life which predates the civilization in Egypt. We knew that even Egypt got its civilization from Sudan. An observation that must be noted carefully is that the Ijebu and the Sudanese have the same ethnic face mark. I have already stated that it is the Yoruba who traveled north. These Yoruba scarification marks and cornrows were seen among blacks before Columbus in America

There are some three controversies among the Yoruba that I can not ignore: Ijebu, Ilorin and Benin. Threats, intimidation, trading insults and ultimatums will not help. While history is subject to research, sheer convenience of ethnocentricity will not stand up to scrutiny. Let us appreciate and celebrate what history has given us and think about what we are going to give the next generation.

Some Ijebu claim that they are not Yoruba, they came from Waddai. Others claimed that Awujale, Ilari named Agbejaile or Alajaile himself came from Oyo to make peace between Ife and Owu. There are other speculations I will not even touch. But Ijebu Igbo and Remo assert autonomy from Ijebu Ode. One has to square that with Ijebu-Ife connection. If you walk like a Yoruba, look like a Yoruba, speak like Yoruba, you are a Yoruba! That should end it. But there is validity about Wadai and the Ijebu. The Ijebu said their Oba was some generations senior to Oduduwa because they showed his child his way to the Ocean when he got lost. He wanted ocean water to cure Oduduwa's blindness. If my assumption of Oduduwa before Christ is correct, they might have dealt with Oduduwa descendant not necessarily the son. As for Waddai, most Yoruba explorers and traders pass through Wadai, Danfur, Thebes, and Owodaiye in today Ethiopia on their way to and from the Nile. Not only the Ijebu.

There are other ethnic groups who are also related to the Sudanese. They cooperated and fought one another as the circumstances demanded from Egypt, Sudan to the rain forest.

The similarity between the Ijebu dialect, Itsekiri dialect and the Yoruba palace language of Benin might have to do with Prince Ginuwa who led the Itsekiri away. Apart from history that claimed that Awujale was as royal as Aresa or Onikoyi in Old Oyo, they were of royal blood among Benin-Itsekiri. That may disprove any notion that the Ijebu were only used as sacrifice or slave of other Yorubas. However, at different points in history, positions changed from slave to master, or master to servant.

Ooni of Ife position must be respected. With the reputation of Oranyan, no ancient Yoruba would crown a usurper Oni if he did not deserve to be there. Let us separate personal grudges from the unity of the Yorubas. Though Oba of Lagos made it clear that there were Yoruba chiefs already in Lagos as owners of the soil, before the Benin came, only personal differences made headlines. Ashipa, the first compromised king after Lagos-Benin battle for Lagos had a name that is common in ancient Yoruba royal houses.

The Afonja of Ilorin controversy is more pathetic. Today, we misplaced blame on the Fulani who were invited to help Afonja against Alafin of Oyo. Afonja became ambitious and wanted to undermine the Alafin. The story was that Afonja thought Alafin was going to move on him with an impossible task to accomplish. Afonja then got help to overthrow the Alafin. Afonja found himself at the mercy of the Fulani and lost it all, because Alafin put a curse on him. Where is the blame? The problem today is that the Fulani have rightly assimilated into Ilorin so much that the Yoruba find it difficult to be the Oba of Ilorin. They have lost the supremacy of Oba and there is confusion in a Yoruba land. How do you get someone whose father or mother is a Fulani to deny their birth? Nevertheless, many ethnic groups had assimilated well into Yoruba culture without denying their origin. Melting pot is part of Yoruba culture as long as it is not confrontational. Ibadan is a case in point.

In the case of Benin, all due respect must be accorded the Oba of Benin as one of the descendants of Oduduwa. On his study of Yoruba history, he wrote that it was Orunmila who started the Yoruba kingdoms including Ife and Ado, not Oduduwa. He has a brother in the person of Ewi of Ado Ekiti who is now embarrassed by the controversy. Oba of Benin told us the meaning of Eweka, Owo mi ka, line of descendant. In the same lingua fraca of his palace up to a point in time. Nobody has so far denied that the head of former Obas of Benin were buried in Ife. How can the Oba query the facts of Egharevba's book based on his mother's relation (Edo n'ekue) to Yoruba? It is a popular saying in Edo that only a son of Edo culture can be a ruler of Benin. Oranmiyan was not, so he married into the culture to produce a ruler from that culture.

Ekaladerhan was a man of the culture, Benin historians still have to settle on if he fought to death when Benin soldier went after him in Ughoton the same way they went after Ginuwa in Warri. Each time he got information about Benin, "he was stricken with fear that they were still after his head." By the way, this was centuries after Oduduwa.

In view of these three controversies, their subjects who have unflinching loyalty to Yoruba must be in a difficult position. Embrace novel theories or walk a fine line. It has been said that special ceremony or ritual is needed to reverse the curse of Alafin. The none-Yoruba theory of the Ijebu is hardly taken seriously since majority of them see themselves as nothing else, but will not stand for any insult. More problematic, is that of Oba of Benin. He is highly respected and rightly so. Others with the same theory can be ignored, not him. Because he is also one of our Obas.

One can tell the difference between the comments coming from the Ogiso and that coming from the Oba descendants. None of the Oba line can reject Yoruba connection: "How safe is Ife" is still the greetings. While the Ogiso trumpet the influence and achievement of the Obas, they missed the opportunity to educate us about that of Ogiso. Indeed, Professor Ekeh did more to educate us about the Ogiso, as the one the Urhobo were familiar with before the Oba were ingrained in Benin culture.

Yoruba must stop fighting each other. Those who have made it in other lands – Cuba, Brazil, Benin Republic, Europe, Asia and other America must not severe the bridges they crossed. Oduduwa came back home and proved himself, one day your children will come back home. YORUBA RONU!

---

In what ways can the ideas of the Akan, Bantu, and Yoruba be traced back to Ancient Egyptian philosophy?

partial answer to this question:

In a search for the roots of the Yoruba religion one can look to the Egyptians. One has to remember that religion and philosophy are very difficult to separate in some of these early civilizations. What can be deduced from archeological and historic records the Yoruba people migrated from east to west. J. Olumide Lucas in his book The Religion of the Yorubas" traces their history as a civilization back to Egypt. "A chain of evidence leads to the conclusion that they must have settled for many years in that part of the continent known as Ancient Egypt." (Cook, 1974, p. 184) In his work Lucas shows that there were similarities in language, religion and customs between these two groups of people.

"Abundant proof of intimate connection between ancient Egyptians and the Yoruba may be produced under this head. Most of the principle gods were well known, at one time, to the Yoruba. Among these gods are Osiris, Isis, Horus, Shu, Sut, Troth, Khepera, Amon, Anu, Khonsu, Khnum, Khopri, Hathor, Sokaris, Ra, Seb, the elemental deities and others. Most of the gods survive in name or in attributes or in both" (Lucas, 1948, p.21).

In comparing the religions, we find that the Yoruba had a moon deity known as Osu (moon) which is the Egyptian lunar god Khonsu. To find the conclusive proof of this similarity one has to look at the etymological development of the Yoruba language. In the Yoruba language Kh does not exist. By following the consonant - vowel rules in Yoruba the vowel is dropped and you are left with the word Osu from Khonsu. If we follow this etymological analysis we find that "Amon exists in Yoruba with the same meaning it has in ancient Egyptian: hidden. The god Amon is one of the first deities known by the Yoruba and the words Mon and Mimon (holy and sacred) are probably derived from the name of that god, according to Lucas. Troth would become To in Yoruba" (Cook, 1974, p. 185).

Following this lead we can see that the development of a monotheistic religion had it roots in the land of Egypt. Although many have claimed that the religion of the Egyptians was polytheistic in fact it was not. Moses even went so far as to declare that Yahweh, like the God of Egypt, was one (Deut. vi.4).
To the Egyptians Path was a spirit self created having no beginning or end. Path was the intelligence of the universe and it was his thoughts that produced the material world and everything in it. Path had power in the words that resided in his mouth. This idea was pointed out by Jablonski where he connected it with the Hebrew idea of how the world was created by their God. The idea of an all powerful god was developed in Egypt and spread with the migration of the Yoruba people. This spiritual conception of god and the universe was begun in the Nile valley 4000 years before the Christian era. Later we see Amen of Thebes be declared as having the same power and nature as Path. "...Lucas recalls that all the ontological notions of the ancient Egyptians, such as the Ka, Akhu, Khu, Sahu, and Ba are found in the Yoruba" (Cook. 1974, p. 186). We see in the Egyptian Ka transformed into the Guarding spirit of the Yoruba.

The final cement for an Egyptian and Yoruba connection is the existence of Yoruba hieroglyphics. "To conclude, let us note that Pedrals mentions, on page 107, the Kuso Hill near Ife and the existence of a Kuso Hill in Nubia, near ancient Meroe,west of the Nile 'in the heart of the land of Kush'" (Cook, 1974, p. 187). From this we can thus consider that a historical connection of facts joins the Egyptian and the Yoruba civilizations together.

The labyrinth of religious development is long and complex from its root beginnings at the dawn of civilization to its numerous forms in the present day. Its importance for the peoples of Africa was to keep them secure through out their long history. Whether as rulers of great civilizations or as slavesin foreign countries the Yoruba maintained their identity and life blood throughout their religious convictions and heritage.

Selected Bibliography

Cook, M. (1974) The African Origin of CivilizationChicago

Lucas, J. O. (1948) The Religion of the YorubasLagos

References

Mbiti J.S. (1975) Introduction to African ReligionNew York

Noss, J. B. (1949) Man's ReligionNew York: Macmillan

Wippler, G. M. (1989) Santeria The ReligionNew York

Wippler, G. M. (1994) Legends of Santeria Minn.

J.Eberts
-----------------------------------------------

THE YORUBA NUMBER SYSTEM

The Yoruba people currently number over 15 million. According to their legends, they came from the East, to settle in what is now Nigeria, Togo, and the Republic of Benin (Dahomey). Many historians believe that the Yoruba migrated to their present home from Upper Egypt, between 600 and 1000 A.D. They are city-dwellers. Their ancient cities of Ife and Oyo were founded between 800 and 1000 A.D.

The Yoruba have always had a monarch, whom they believe to be descended from their gods. However, the Yoruba government and social structure is not dictatorial. Responsibilities are shared. Although recognition and respect for rank is evident, there is also the possibility of moving up in rank through hard work. In fact, the Yoruba describe their culture as "a river that is never at rest".

The Yoruba were great traders. The city of Oyo, founded by a group of traders, was positioned to control trade routes all the way to the coast. They traded gold, slaves, and cocoa.

In her book, Africa Counts, Claudia Zaslavsky describes the Yoruba number system as a complex system based on 20 (vigesimal) that uses subtraction to express numbers. For example,

35 = (2 x 20) - 5; 47 = (3 x 20) - 10 - 3; 51 = (3 x 20) - 10 + 1;

55 = (3 x 20) - 5; 67 = (4 x 20) - 10 - 3; 73 = (4 x 20) - 10 + 3;

86 = (5 x 20) - 10 - 4; 117 = (6 x 20) - 3

According to the Yoruba system, the numbers from 1 to 10 have unique names. The numbers 11, 12, 13, and 14 are written additively (i.e., 11 = 10 + 1, 12 = 10 + 2, 13 = 10 + 3, 14 = 10 + 4). But the numbers from 15 through 19 are written using subtraction from 20. The numbers 21, 22, 23, and 24 are also written additively. The numbers 25 -29 are written as subtractions from 30. Each number after 30 is written as a multiple of 20 plus or minus tens and units. This pattern is repeated for numbers up to 200. After 200, the system becomes irregular. The number 20 and its multiples are considered special to the Yoruba. Here are some of their Yoruba names.

20 = ogun; 40 = ogun meji; 200 = igba; 400 = irinwo.

Although this number system seems very difficult and abstract to westerners, it is perfectly natural to the Yoruba and is still used today.

YORUBA CURRENCY

Until recently, cowrie shells were the basic unit of currency in Africa. Cowries were either counted in groups of 5 or pierced and threaded in strings of 40. According to the Yoruba system for counting cowries,

40 cowries = 1 string; 2000 cowries = 1 head or 50 strings;

20,000 cowries = 1 bag or 10 heads.

As part of their trading commerce, the Yoruba had to count huge numbers of cowries. When a cowrie counter had to count thousands of shells, he would empty the bag onto the floor and start counting 20s by making 4 groups of 5 shells each. Then the counter would make 5 groups of 20 to make 100. Then 2 groups of 100 would be pushed together to make the important 200. The subtractive principle developed from counting in this manner. The Yoruba also learned to estimate well when counting large quantities of cowrie shells.

MATHEMATICS ACTIVITIES

Put about 200 counters of uniform size all together on a table or the floor. Some examples of counters are M&Ms, pennies, chips, cookies, lima beans, macaroni, or peanuts. Begin separating the counters as the Yoruba would, into groups of 5, 20, and 100. Using your counters, show each of the following amounts: 25, 46, 72. Explain how the Yoruba system of subtraction developed from counting cowries.
Express each of the following numbers according to the Yoruba number system:
a. 37 b. 62 c. 108

Explain the Yoruba number system in your own words.
Why do you think the system becomes unpredictable for numbers larger than 200. Provide an example with your explanation.
How does the Yoruba system compare to Roman Numerals? What are some similarities and differences?

Fadu
Jun 4, 2008, 10:29 AM
Thanks Iyaalata

This is fascinating and educating, I loved the way you link the History. Please can you recommend any Yoruba History text book, probably one you've written. I am from Popo Aguda "omo oromi re"……..will be interested to find out where my name originated from.

My knowledge of my family is, my great great great grandfather was an Herbalist and Ifa oracle consultant to the Oba of Lagos.

You've obviously enlighten me in some areas I lacked knowledge.
Thanks again.

Fadu

Khalil
Jun 5, 2008, 10:29 AM
Thanks Iyaalata for such a revealing piece. But does this mean Yoruba created all that was in ancient Egypt in faith and practice or were they only a part who may have copied from others in ancient Egypt?

If they were the ones who created all, I would want to have some significant authority behind the claim.

If they only copied some or majority of it, I would want to know how long it took before it started being called, Yoruba spritualism, Yoruba calender, etc.

Also I want to know the time range it will take after copying other peoples things before I start calling them my own!

Thanks with sincerity.

Khalilurrahman

Alata
Jun 5, 2008, 11:11 AM
Thanks Iyaalata for such a revealing piece. But does this mean Yoruba created all that was in ancient Egypt in faith and practice or were they only a part who may have copied from others in ancient Egypt?

If they were the ones who created all, I would want to have some significant authority behind the claim.

If they only copied some or majority of it, I would want to know how long it took before it started being called, Yoruba spritualism, Yoruba calender, etc.

Also I want to know the time range it will take after copying other peoples things before I start calling them my own!

Thanks with sincerity.

Khalilurrahman

My research is ongoing into the answers to questions such as yours, as well as to the extent to authenticity of a Yoruba - KMT heritage. I hope it is clear that I did not originate the article. I found it elsewhere and posted it here in the likelihood that it might be interesting and a discussion might ensue.

Ti eyin ba ru, iwaju adaru. when the past is distorted, then the future becomes scattered
It may be that the predominant form of African recorded history has been sculptural (written into sculpture) and architectural. If we can get the Afrikan Museum Ijebu (http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/board/career-jobs-exchange/72999-ijebu-museum-proposed-posts.html#post4295047519) project going, it may be feasible to research archaeology of old Yoruba settlements and of other historical settlements along possible routes up to old Nubia in the Nile valley. Unfortunately, the race is on against Egypt - Sudan plans to flood the area.

Khalil
Jun 5, 2008, 02:43 PM
My research is ongoing into the answers to questions such as yours, as well as to the extent to authenticity of a Yoruba - KMT heritage. I hope it is clear that I did not originate the article. I found it elsewhere and posted it here in the likelihood that it might be interesting and a discussion might ensue.


I understand your quest as I think I do your goals. I appreciate your efforts and hope it will further help in building the template on which each and every humankind will begin to see themselves as one regardless of race, color or ethnicity.

Right now many cultures trace their origin to Egypt as many races. As this continues we hope to emerge in our full place as one human race with one reality that brought us to bear on this planet and, of course, on the path of one destiny.

It is then all will come to the full picture of the truth of the unity of our creator and the existence of His absoluteness in the end of all our contradictions and relative inklings.

It is then we will know the mind of God.

Thanks again

Khalilurrahman

Namio
Jun 5, 2008, 09:42 PM
Fadu,

If your name is Aromire, your father is more than a consultant to Oba of Lagos. Aromire is one of the sons of Ogunfuminire, one of the sons or great of Oduduwa that came to Isheri. Aromire and his brothers crossed from from Ido where one of the brothers stay to Lagos. In other words, one of the Omo Onile. The Omo Onile were in existence before a compromised Oba between Benin and Omo Onile was installed as Ashipa, the first king of Lagos. Contrary to Benin claim, Ashipa is a name that existed in Yoruba land before even Benin Obaship was established by Oramiyan. Before Oba, Benin was govern by Ogiso, another Ife decendant.





Thanks Iyaalata

This is fascinating and educating, I loved the way you link the History. Please can you recommend any Yoruba History text book, probably one you've written. I am from Popo Aguda "omo oromi re"……..will be interested to find out where my name originated from.

My knowledge of my family is, my great great great grandfather was an Herbalist and Ifa oracle consultant to the Oba of Lagos.

You've obviously enlighten me in some areas I lacked knowledge.
Thanks again.

Fadu

QuestVis
May 4, 2010, 09:25 PM
okay- looks well reserached

agbonizuanghwe
May 5, 2010, 10:12 PM
okay- looks well reserached

Not quite. there is a lot of information to say that not all peoples that make up the modern day Yoruba decended from or followed Oduduwa from the banks of the Nile.

also that they lived on the banks of the Nile does not make them Egyptian. It has been posited that they are actually a different culture that due to association shared some things in come with ancient Egyptians. It is also said that the original migrants fled the war and gradually wound their way (with temporary settlements at various places) down to present day Yoruba land.

What i do not get is why we find the need to at all cost associate ourselves to either Egypt or israel? It leaves me with the impression that we regard these cultures as superior to whatever we evolved from?!

UncleTisha
Jun 3, 2010, 10:58 PM
Not quite. there is a lot of information to say that not all peoples that make up the modern day Yoruba decended from or followed Oduduwa from the banks of the Nile.

also that they lived on the banks of the Nile does not make them Egyptian. It has been posited that they are actually a different culture that due to association shared some things in come with ancient Egyptians. It is also said that the original migrants fled the war and gradually wound their way (with temporary settlements at various places) down to present day Yoruba land.

What i do not get is why we find the need to at all cost associate ourselves to either Egypt or israel? It leaves me with the impression that we regard these cultures as superior to whatever we evolved from?!


@agbonizuanghwe,

Please can you give me an essential memory upgrade by pointing me in the direction of that information referred to above?

Many thanks.

feyi
Apr 15, 2012, 04:43 AM
The Yoruba are of Israel that was deported by the Assyrian Empire. The name 'Yoruba' is thought to be derived from 'Jeroboam'. A German emeritus professor of African history, Dierk Lange, has put forth convincing arguments in this regard.