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Tola Odejayi
Jan 17, 2008, 08:59 PM
I recently went for a medical examination, and I was told that my body mass index (BMI) calculated from on my height and weight was just over 25, which meant that I was verging on being overweight.

I was surprised at this. Yes, I'm 1.76cm and weigh 78 kg. But (putting modesty to one side), I don't think I'm a slob - have a 31 inch waist, I eat reasonably healthily and I exercise quite a lot. So I ask the Doctors in the House - is the BMI really a good way of telling whether I am overweight or not? If not, is there a better way?

EezeeBee
Jan 18, 2008, 06:09 AM
SLB!

As long as you aren't the guy pictured below, I think you're okay!:D
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f396/cuppers/WhyWomenShouldn_tHaveOnlineAffairs.jpg

Bunch17
Jan 18, 2008, 11:34 AM
I recently went for a medical examination, and I was told that my body mass index (BMI) calculated from on my height and weight was just over 25, which meant that I was verging on being overweight.

I was surprised at this. Yes, I'm 1.76cm and weigh 78 kg. But (putting modesty to one side), I don't think I'm a slob - have a 31 inch waist, I eat reasonably healthily and I exercise quite a lot. So I ask the Doctors in the House - is the BMI really a good way of telling whether I am overweight or not? If not, is there a better way?

Now that I have calmed down, let me attempt to answer your question.
High BMI was initially used as an indicator of health as well as risk factors to certain diseases. But the problem with it was that it did not differentiate between Fat Bustards and heavily muscular and chisselled individuals. It is now being ditched in favor of Total Body Fat (TBF).
BMI has still remained not for it's acuracy but because of ease of measure. ie weight and height are easy to measure ( and don't require any training) unlike TBF.

Your BMI is actually good ( show off! :D) . I bet you are the minority amongst NVS men ( in making myself feel good mode:biggrin:). Your 31 inch waist would be a negative factor for metabolic syndrome.

http://besttreatments.bmj.com/btuk/conditions/1000673125.html (http://besttreatments.bmj.com/btuk/conditions/1000673125.html)

Myne Whitman
Jan 18, 2008, 11:40 AM
Dr Bunch,

I used to think that the BMI threshhold for being overweight was 25 for women and 28 for men? No mind SLB, he is using style to show off and yab us overweight people. :)

BTW, it's obvious your clinic is subscribed to BMJ. Your link requires login...

Bunch17
Jan 18, 2008, 12:03 PM
Dr Bunch,

I used to think that the BMI threshhold for being overweight was 25 for women and 28 for men? No mind SLB, he is using style to show off and yab us overweight people. :)

BTW, it's obvious your clinic is subscribed to BMJ. Your link requires login...

Thank you for pointing this out.
Here is the article.


The metabolic syndrome

In this section
What is it?
How common is it?
What causes it?
How is it diagnosed?
How can it be prevented?

What is it?
The metabolic syndrome isn't a disease. It's a group of features that are linked to your body's metabolism. Your metabolism is the name given to all the chemical processes that take place in your body.

The metabolic syndrome is also known as syndrome X or insulin resistance syndrome.1

The most common features of the metabolic syndrome are:

* Excess body fat around the abdomen
* High levels of harmful fats in the blood
* Low levels of a 'good' fat called high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol
* Blood pressure that is higher than normal
* Blood that clots too much
* Problems with how your body uses insulin. This means there may be too much sugar (glucose) in your blood.

If you think you have any of the features of the metabolic syndrome, your doctor will tell you what to do to stay healthy. Your doctor will tell you what to do to stay healthy. Losing weight and doing regular exercise are important. Your doctor may advise you to make other changes in the way you live, and you may also need to take medicine.

If you have metabolic syndrome, you are more likely to get type 2 diabetes, heart disease, a stroke and some other conditions.1

How common is it?
The metabolic syndrome is very common. In the UK, up to a quarter of people may have it.2

What causes it?
If you have the metabolic syndrome, your body's insulin doesn't work as well as it should. This is called insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can be caused by:

* Being overweight
* Not getting enough exercise
* Your genes or things related to your family.

How is it diagnosed?
There is no special test for the metabolic syndrome. And you don't get symptoms straight away. The health problems it can cause, like type 2 diabetes, happen over time.

There are no guidelines for doctors in the UK about diagnosing the metabolic syndrome. But there are guidelines from the International Diabetes Federation.3

The guidelines say that you have the metabolic syndrome if you have a certain waist measurement, plus some other features. The waist measurement is different for men and women, and for different ethnic groups.

* If you are a man of South Asian or Chinese origin, the waist measurement is 90 centimetres (about 35 inches) or greater. If you are a man of Japanese origin, the measurement is 85 centimetres (about 33 inches) or greater. For all other men, the measurement is 94 centimetres (37 inches) or greater.
* If you are a woman, the waist measurement is 80 centimetres (about 31 inches) or greater.

You also must have at least two of the following four things:

* The level of fats called triglycerides in your blood is 1.7 mmol/L or higher before breakfast, or you are taking medicine to lower your triglyceride levels. (The term mmol/L stands for millimoles per litre.)
* Your level of good (HDL) cholesterol is less than 1.03 mmol/L if you are a man, or less than 1.29 mmol/L if you are a woman or if you are taking medicine to raise your HDL cholesterol.
* The level of glucose in your blood is more than 5.6 mmol/L before breakfast, or you have diabetes.
* Your blood pressure is 130/85 or higher or you are taking medicine to lower your blood pressure. For more, see our articles on high blood pressure.

To find out the levels of glucose, fats and cholesterol in your blood, your doctor will do a blood test.

How can it be prevented?
You can't change your genes. But you can:

* Keep your weight down
* Eat healthily
* Exercise
* Drink alcohol in moderation. That's one drink a day for women or two drinks a day for men.

See your doctor if you think you might have the metabolic syndrome or any of the features of it.