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crimsonbabe
Sep 22, 2007, 08:06 PM
androgen insensitivity syndrome.. they look like female..... with good curves and all...it is better for them to grow up as female.... jamie lee curtis has the syndrome....the actress.....
the other syndrome that makes women look like men is called hyperandrogenism.....
polycystic ovary syndrome can cause high testosterone in women......
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can also make women look like men...


for men to look like women...hyperestrogenism...i think...

i use to label both group too until i got into med sch.....
I have heard about polycystic ovarian syndrome but i didnt know it made women look like men. I thought it was just that conceiving may be difficult. Its made the news a lot in recent years and women like Victoria Beckham and Jules Oliver have talked abt suffering from it but they sure dont look masculine to me

Really learning a lot from this thread

Thanks
CB

.bebi
Sep 22, 2007, 09:13 PM
I have heard about polycystic ovarian syndrome but i didnt know it made women look like men. I thought it was just that conceiving may be difficult. Its made the news on on lot in recent years and women like Victoria Beckham and Jules Oliver have talked abt suffering from it but they sure dont look masculine to me

Really learning on on lot from this thread

Thanks
CB


PCOS i.e Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome makes women hairy hence the looking like men part.Also causes infertility.

SNB
Sep 23, 2007, 02:29 AM
PCOS i.e Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome makes women hairy hence the looking like men part.Also causes infertility.



PCOS...does it have permanent effect of infertility? I thought PCOS was an absence of Ovulation which can be treated successfully with Metformin. Patients who are overweight are often asked to shed a few pounds.


But miracles do happen, I know someone who has PCOS and just had a child. It took a while but God dey answer prayer. This explains why I know more than a bit about the subject matter.

joyhappiness
Sep 23, 2007, 06:59 AM
PCOS...does it have permanent effect of infertility? I thought PCOS was an absence of Ovulation which can be treated successfully with Metformin. Patients who are overweight are often asked to shed a few pounds.


But miracles do happen, I know someone who has PCOS and just had a child. It took a while but God dey answer prayer. This explains why I know more than a bit about the subject matter.

thank God for ur friend
WITH GOD ALL THINGS ARE POSSIBLE...

@emj
will go to the health section....
i am a med student....almost done sha... God dey....

Bunch17
Sep 23, 2007, 08:41 AM
Bunch 17, Bebi, Joyhappiness, can u guys please do more justice to the various health issues raised here in the health section.
Thanks:wink:

I will try to put something down this evening.
CB sorry I have not been able to respond earlier.

Bunch17
Sep 23, 2007, 02:11 PM
Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a condition associated with the presence of several cysts in the ovary. These cysts exist in a state of arrested development cause absence of ovulation in several instances. There is also a disturbance of the hormonal profile of the female including an increased production of androgens leading to the presence of androgen mediated features such as increased hair facial growth, acne and change in voice.

It is a common condition but fortunately the effects are not severe in several people. There is a possibility that some of the ladies having prolonged/irregular periods and regular electrolysis to treat facial hairs may have it. Some studies state that polycystic ovaries are incidental findings in about a quarter of pelvic/ abdominal ultrasound scans. As indicated in above, lots of people have very mild or asymptomatic PCOS.

There has been a "sub classification" into Classical, Biochemical and Radiological PCOS. Biochemical PCOS is when you have the characteristic hormonal changes but no cysts on scans. Radiological PCOS is when you have cysts on scans but no hormonal abnormality, while in classical you have a combination of both. Are you confused? You are not alone. We have not yet fully understood this condition.

Causes

Not yet fully understood but the pre-eminent hypothesis seems to be that it results from ovarian insensitivity to the hormone insulin. There have been studies which followed up women diagnosed with PCOS and the result was that most of these women developed Type II Diabetes within 20 years.

Like Type II Diabetes, it runs in families and is also associated with increased risk of hypertension and raised cholesterol. Weight is a chicken and egg issue as far as PCOS is concerned. People who are overweight have a higher risk of insulin insensitivity while insulin insensitivity also caused abnormal weight gain.

Symptoms

The classic symptoms of PCOS are acne, male pattern hair growth, hoarse voice, menstrual irregularity and abnormal weight gain and sometimes subfertility. Very few women present this way. In some women it may be asymptomatic or manifest only as either irregular periods or acne.

It is extremely rare to see the overt masculination due to this condition.

Treatment

Treatment could be drug treatment or non drug treatment. Exercise, healthy eating and especially weight loss are some of the non drug treatments. The first two lead to the third and weight loss can greatly reduce symptoms of PCOS including subfertility and menstrual irregularity. In my humble opinion, non drug treatment is vital because not only does it help with PCOS, it reduces ones risk of developing Type II Diabetes, Hypertension etc.

I think I will include electrolysis here for treatment of male pattern hair growth.
Until recently there was a surgical treatment which involved cutting out a part of the ovary. We still don't know how that worked but it did work.

Drug treatment is not always necessary and depends on the predominant symptom and the effect it has on the individual eg 36 year old lady, 4 children irregular periods ( no acne, no hair growth) opted for no treatment.

Menstrual irregularity, concerned about it but not ready to conceive one can regularise the period by using oral contraceptives especially Dianette.

Acne with or without hair growth one can use anti androgens such cyproterone acetate (contained in Dianette) or spironolactone a diuretic.

If fertility is a problem, then one can try to stimulate ovulation using clomiphene (clomid) or metformin used in treatment of type II diabetes. It acts by reducing insulin resistance.

I hope I have covered most areas and would be grateful if others could correct or fill in any holes that may exist in this write up.

emj
Sep 23, 2007, 05:26 PM
Thanks a bunch for the info, Bunch17:eek::p

.bebi
Sep 23, 2007, 06:11 PM
Bunch 17, Bebi, Joyhappiness, can u guys please do more justice to the various health issues raised here in the health section.
Thanks:wink:

I try my best but 'll keep trying sha.:neutral:

.bebi
Sep 23, 2007, 06:22 PM
PCOS...does it have permanent effect of infertility? I thought PCOS was an absence of Ovulation which can be treated successfully with Metformin. Patients who are overweight are often asked to shed a few pounds.


But miracles do happen, I know someone who has PCOS and just had a child. It took a while but God dey answer prayer. This explains why I know more than a bit about the subject matter.

There r no absolutes in medicine.Every once in a while,u get a patient that defies the odds which I put down to the power of God.
That aside sha,PCOS is treatable.PCOS causes insulin resistance,that is why Metformin is used in treating it but clomiphene(a fertility drug)seems more effective.
I am not an authority here,just my 2 cents.:smile::lol:

Bunch17
Sep 23, 2007, 06:48 PM
I just want to add that on the issue of fertility PCOS and subfertility is not a certainty. I cannot recollect any literature which gives the ratio of women with PCOS who develop fertility problems but what is certain is that there are much more fertile women diagnosed at one time or the other with PCOS than there are subfertile women with PCOS.

crimsonbabe
Sep 24, 2007, 09:17 PM
There r no absolutes in medicine.Every once in a while,u get a patient that defies the odds which I put down to the power of God.
That aside sha,PCOS is treatable.PCOS causes insulin resistance,that is why Metformin is used in treating it but clomiphene(a fertility drug)seems more effective.
I am not an authority here,just my 2 cents.:smile::lol:


A good friend of mine has PCOS so talked to her abt it over the weekend and she was okay with sharing me sharing her treatment here.

She was diagnosed a few years ago and years of irregular periods with no other symptoms, not fat (in fat, she's skinny:D) no unwanted body or facial hairs and no acne. Apparently her only symptoms was the irregular periods. Tests showed hormonal inbalance and confirmed PCOS. She was put on oral contraceptives to regulate her periods/hormones since her dr felt that scar tissues from not regulating the hormones and allowing more cysts to form in her ovaries were more harmful than being on the pill and advised to let the Dr know once she was ready to get pregnant.

Metformin was advised for her since test showed that she didnt have insulin resistance. She got married Easter 2006 and wanted to get pregant asap. The dr made her wait for abt 3 months and then prescribed Clomid (bebi, i sthat the same as clomiphene?), she was pregnant 3 months later and had a lovely baby girl who's about 3 montsh now and plans to use Clomid again when her baby is at least 9 months old.

Does Clomid typically work that fast and was she just lucky? Could have had something to do with her age (26)?

Also is there a connection between PCOS and Fibroids that seems so very common among black women today

CB

enitan
Sep 25, 2007, 12:34 PM
Crimsonbabe, please let make a few quick corrections...Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) does not make women look like men.

In lay terms, androgen insensitivity simply means a reduced sensitivity to androgens (predominantly male hormones), this has nought to do with PCOS.

PCOS can cause a higher level of testosterone in women, this is true, but as hormone levels vary among individuals the consequences equally vary. It could range from no effect at all, to the common quicker rate of coarse hair growth in 'unwanted places', notably the face.

I would refrain from writing an essay explaining the differences between the conditions that joyhappiness has mentioned, i just needed to clear the air.

PCOS, hyperandrogenism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are all distinct syndromes give or take some overlaps.

So please, whoever has PCOS, like i do,
i hasten to mention, need not worry they will 'look like men' there is absolutely no truth in that. i would suggest people do some research from reputable sources. Let us get our facts straight and not scare people with incorrect information.

crimsonbabe
Sep 25, 2007, 04:58 PM
Crimsonbabe, please let make a few quick corrections...Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) does not make women look like men.

In lay terms, androgen insensitivity simply means a reduced sensitivity to androgens (predominantly male hormones), this has nought to do with PCOS.

PCOS can cause a higher level of testosterone in women, this is true, but as hormone levels vary among individuals the consequences equally vary. It could range from no effect at all, to the common quicker rate of coarse hair growth in 'unwanted places', notably the face.

I would refrain from writing an essay explaining the differences between the conditions that joyhappiness has mentioned, i just needed to clear the air.

PCOS, hyperandrogenism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are all distinct syndromes give or take some overlaps.

So please, whoever has PCOS, like i do,
i hasten to mention, need not worry they will 'look like men' there is absolutely no truth in that. i would suggest people do some research from reputable sources. Let us get our facts straight and not scare people with incorrect information.

Thx Enitan for pointing this out but I never said it made people look like men, instead went as far to say that the women I know with PCOS most definitey do not look like men

Thanks
CB

Anonymous Villager
Sep 25, 2007, 05:15 PM
Crimsonbabe, please let make a few quick corrections...Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) does not make women look like men.

i hasten to mention, need not worry they will 'look like men' there is absolutely no truth in that. i would suggest people do some research from reputable sources. Let us get our facts straight and not scare people with incorrect information.

Enitan,

Kindly take the time to review posts before coming to conclusions. I suggest you shouldn't conflate issues. This thread started as a result of discussing the androgen insensitivity syndrome. This thread has been very informative to all.

Welcome to NVS.

Bunch17
Sep 28, 2007, 06:10 PM
A good friend of mine has PCOS so talked to her abt it over the weekend and she was okay with sharing me sharing her treatment here.

She was diagnosed a few years ago and years of irregular periods with no other symptoms, not fat (in fat, she's skinny:D) no unwanted body or facial hairs and no acne. Apparently her only symptoms was the irregular periods. Tests showed hormonal inbalance and confirmed PCOS. She was put on oral contraceptives to regulate her periods/hormones since her dr felt that scar tissues from not regulating the hormones and allowing more cysts to form in her ovaries were more harmful than being on the pill and advised to let the Dr know once she was ready to get pregnant.

Metformin was advised for her since test showed that she didnt have insulin resistance. She got married Easter 2006 and wanted to get pregant asap. The dr made her wait for abt 3 months and then prescribed Clomid (bebi, i sthat the same as clomiphene?), she was pregnant 3 months later and had a lovely baby girl who's about 3 montsh now and plans to use Clomid again when her baby is at least 9 months old.

Does Clomid typically work that fast and was she just lucky? Could have had something to do with her age (26)?

Also is there a connection between PCOS and Fibroids that seems so very common among black women today

CB

Using clomid again when the baby is 9 months old? Please advise her not to be hasty. Tell her to first get herself tested to see if she is ovulating. If she is then no need for clomid and there is a higher posibility of having multiple if she takes clomid.

Fertility can sometimes be like trying to get ketchup out of a bottle, it is initially difficult but when it starts it is difficult to stop.

Clomid can work that fast and her age would count as a positive factor.
No PCOS and Fibroids are not related. PCOS is due to a pathology in the ovaries while Fibroids is with the uterus. Uterine fibroids is unfortunately a disease of black women.
It is extremely common but fortunately does not cause serious problems in a lot of women. Problems include pain, heavy periods, sometimes subfertility. They tend to shrink with child bearing and with menopause.

I don't know how true this is but in Med School we were told "Bad girls get pregnant while Good girls get Fibroids" I don't know if this is still true but this was based on studies showing that it was far more common amongst catholic nuns. This may be due to the effect child bearing towards regression.

crimsonbabe
Sep 28, 2007, 10:09 PM
Using clomid again when the baby is 9 months old? Please advise her not to be hasty. Tell her to first get herself tested to see if she is ovulating. If she is then no need for clomid and there is a higher posibility of having multiple if she takes clomid.

Fertility can sometimes be like trying to get ketchup out of a bottle, it is initially difficult but when it starts it is difficult to stop.

Clomid can work that fast and her age would count as a positive factor.
No PCOS and Fibroids are not related. PCOS is due to a pathology in the ovaries while Fibroids is with the uterus. Uterine fibroids is unfortunately a disease of black women.
It is extremely common but fortunately does not cause serious problems in a lot of women. Problems include pain, heavy periods, sometimes subfertility. They tend to shrink with child bearing and with menopause.

I don't know how true this is but in Med School we were told "Bad girls get pregnant while Good girls get Fibroids" I don't know if this is still true but this was based on studies showing that it was far more common amongst catholic nuns. This may be due to the effect child bearing towards regression.


Thanks Dr Bunch. I will be sure to tell her about checking to see if she's ovulating but would like to think that any good doctor should check that first if its a pre-requisite as I understand from you

Yes, fibroids is so common among black women and I know so many women that have had this disease..


CB