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Kehinde Akintobi
Aug 8, 2007, 10:07 PM
National Discussions…A project of Basic Principles

10 Alternatives to Oil, 10 Keys to National Prosperity 1
Nothing good comes easy, or so it is said. With good comes another level of good and something is termed good by what it brings along with it. Nigeria's oil seems to have brought with it more challenges than opportunities, more issues than solutions. Corruption, environmental pollution, marginalisation and an emphasis on sharing federal revenue rather than justifying its expenditure are some of the issues that have arisen as a result.

Though the option of solar energy, thermodynamics, bio diesel and windmills have all been suggested as alternatives to energy and power generation and such we appreciate and note, we are however considering this issue from a standpoint of revenue generation and not one of cross comparison of energy alternatives.

The prosperity of a nation is largely dependent on her people within rather than forces without. A nation's situation therefore is a reflection of how her people think, act or behave. Nigeria's present and embarrassing oil situation should therefore be pointed to her people and not at others or Her Creator. There are several other oil producing nations that are not as bedeviled with the kinds of things that we experience in this country. If we are experiencing something different, it is almost sure that we have done something out of place.

In the face of this realization however is a growing concern. Why keep being insistent on a door that does not seem to want to open at the expense of other ones and in the midst of several opportunities? In this edition of National Discussions, a project of Basic Principles we would be looking at some of these doors and opportunities to create national wealth.

1. Tourism: With cities like London, Paris and Haiti raking in millions from visiting tourists, the hospitality industry, transportation, arts and culture are just a few of beneficiary industries in line with what would accrue to our country if able to attract outsiders to come see what we have to offer and make them comfortable during their stay. Yankari, Obudu and a few others are notable examples with much more to be harnessed and put to proper use. The Tinapa Project sure looks full of opportunities but the question is how prepared and ready are we for it?

2.Sports: United Kingdom, United States, Italy, Spain and Brazil have used popular sports like basketball, football, tennis, golf, motor racing and the like to their advantage in terms of generating tons of national revenue. The question is why can't we? Successful hosting of sporting events, tournaments and fiestas not only yields profit for national purse but also showcases and highlights national, cultural, economic and social capital.

3.Entertainment: Showbiz, music, comedy, movies. It is already happening. It can however be developed. Enabling laws, improving legislation, protecting intellectual copyrights and lowering production costs are ways that government could help. Improving quality, promoting local content and patronage, and producing at internationally acceptable and marketable levels are other essential steps to take.

4.Science and technology: Every economic dominating nation has an edge in science and technology. United States, Britain, Russia, Japan, Germany. You name them. Steering the course of youths and providing logistical support for science based education and a producer nation economy would open doors for a brighter national future. Most of the appliances that we use; phones, computers and cars go to prosper the economies of nations that we buy them from. Why can't we therefore make our own? A nation that does not produce, does not progress.

As we hope to come your way again next week in the continuation and conclusion of this piece, let's think and do something about it.

Wishing you well, hoping and working towards a better Nigeria.
Cheers.

Kehinde Akintobi
74 Randle Avenue, box 190,
Surulere, Lagos
churchonthenet004@yahoo.co.uk
BasicPrinceTriples@yahoo.com
234 08060631373

nf5kmw1
Aug 9, 2007, 04:22 AM
National Discussions…A project of Basic Principles

10 Alternatives to Oil, 10 Keys to National Prosperity 1
Nothing good comes easy, or so it is said. With good comes another level of good and something is termed good by what it brings along with it. Nigeria’s oil seems to have brought with it more challenges than opportunities, more issues than solutions. Corruption, environmental pollution, marginalisation and an emphasis on sharing federal revenue rather than justifying its expenditure are some of the issues that have arisen as a result.

Though the option of solar energy, thermodynamics, bio diesel and windmills have all been suggested as alternatives to energy and power generation and such we appreciate and note, we are however considering this issue from a standpoint of revenue generation and not one of cross comparison of energy alternatives.

The prosperity of a nation is largely dependent on her people within rather than forces without. A nation’s situation therefore is a reflection of how her people think, act or behave. Nigeria’s present and embarrassing oil situation should therefore be pointed to her people and not at others or Her Creator. There are several other oil producing nations that are not as bedeviled with the kinds of things that we experience in this country. If we are experiencing something different, it is almost sure that we have done something out of place.

In the face of this realization however is a growing concern. Why keep being insistent on a door that does not seem to want to open at the expense of other ones and in the midst of several opportunities? In this edition of National Discussions, a project of Basic Principles we would be looking at some of these doors and opportunities to create national wealth.



Kehinde Akintobi

I agree with you 100%. I say "We need to spend more time making more and different national and state cakes" Like you say instead spending fighting over division of the national cake. Donald Duke did that in Cross River State did it. A state were their most valuable part (Bakassi rich in oil) was given to Cameroon. Every time I need to keep the hope alive I look at what he did and I share that with you and all Nigerian!!!
http://nigeriansforsuperenergy.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=17&sid=13f98138258441cf4bd01d05b0f15c1f
My Brother I was also add that until we address the energy(Omega and Alpha of civilization) issue all the alternative above will be difficult to accomplish. I hope you join us and spread the word about our plans for energy.

God Bless and Keep hope alive!!!




http://nigeriansforsuperenergy.com/phpBB3/styles/prosilver/imageset/Banners.gif
Joseph Inyang
Nigerians for Super Energy
2026 N. Oakland Ave
Milwaukee, WI 53202
414-272-1656
www.nigeriansforsuperenergy.com
joe@nigeriansforsuperenegy.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Open Letter to President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua


Dear Mr. President:

We are writing in support of your Energy goals for Nigeria. We believe that Nigeria should become energy “Super Energy Power”. You rightly said so on June 11, 2007 and we quote “As I keep saying, we cannot begin to address, in a fundamental manner, the problems of the economy, until we successfully tackle the power and energy issue. It is critical to all my plans. So I am more interested in how much gas we can tap for domestic use than what we can get for export. We must power this economy,” Mr. President as you know, we have a very sick patient, "Nigerian Energy"; we need world class surgeons to lead this effort no more nurses. No disrespect to my mom she was a nurse for over 40 years!! And when you sign the FOI (Freedom of Information) bill you will have about 100m + eyes helping to monitor the progress of the projects. Mr. President below is our humble suggestions for radically changing our energy strategy.

Fuel Plan
24 Refineries in a National/Publicly traded oil company with global reach is what we need!!!
They say imitation is a form of flattery. If so, Nigeria needs to look to Venezuelans to reform its fuel sector. Due to the policies of Venezuelan oil company, PDVSA, the Venezuelans are able to enjoy $0.19 per gallon or N6.12. The Venezuelan oil company, PDVSA, had decided that it was not the crude oil export business but in the global petroleum and chemical business. So they invested in refining and retail business in Venezuela and almost all their export markets. Today PDVSA processes 3.3m barrels per day through 24 refineries: six complexes in Venezuela, one in the Caribbean, eight in the United States and nine in Europe. The Brazilian Oil company, Petrobras is another example. This company is renowned for its leadership in development of advanced technology from deep-water and ultra-deep water oil production. With 55.7% of Petrobras' Common Shares (with vote right) is owned by the Brazilian government, however privately held portions are traded on Bovespa stock market .On April 21st of 2006, President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva announced Brazil's self-sufficiency in petroleum. Mr. President please seek counsel of the architects of PDVSA, Mr. Putin and/or Silva to see what they are doing. We recommend three strategic steps to revolutionize our oil sector.
1. NNPC should be come a government/public firm with part of it shares allocated for Nigerians. This will provide the company with a new direction and ownership need for the global challenges.
2. NNPC should go on a buying spree with the aid of government funds to buy (outright or major) shares in refineries in Africa, China and United States. This will provide us with immediate source of refined products, opportunities to train our people and hard currency. Best of all this does not need the 18 to 24 months to build a refinery. This will also provide us a stop gag measure until we build more refineries. It is all about add value and we need to start doing that.
3. Start building 4 refineries and retail outlets to take care of the local demand as estimated for 2010. This will help put to rest the fuel challenges that we face as a Nation.

Electrical Plan
50,000 megawatts in a well planned power grid is what we need!!!
Why 50,000 Megawatts? Given our population, the goals (15,000MW, 20,000MW, and 30,000MW) currently proposed in different political and business circles does not take care of latent electrical demand. In 1999 we estimated a goal of 4,000mw and 5,600mw, we have reached those goals but still not able to survive disruptions to the power grid. South Africa with a population of 47M generates 36,000MW, Brazil population 188M generates 90,000MW and South Korea population 49M generates 43,833MW. Nigeria with a population of 140M would need to generate 67,021MW to be at par with Brazil the lowest per capita among the three countries. Based on the current estimates of 10,000mw in current or in progress, we will need 40, 000mw to complete our goal. This translates in 1,100mw per state and Abuja. Yes we know some states may not be able to generate this amount due to logistic or cost can join with other states to meet their goal. Some states like Lagos will need double or triple that amount. Using current estimates we believe that we need $29 billion for completion of the goal which about $15 billion should come from the Federal government.
1. The plan would call for part of excess revenue funds to be invested in power generation and transmission.
2. All sates, Abuja and Local governments must contribute a percentage of their net worth to the projects. Land for projects will be provided by state and local governments.
3. All banks must invest a percentage of their net worth. Corporations and individual investors will be encouraged to invest in the projects with a strong push for public stock participation.
4. All companies must provide free electricity and cooking gas to local communities.
5. Alternate sources must be encouraged, At least one coal power station in Enugu with similar capacity of Tutuka, South Africa 6x609 MW. This should be part of the sale of 13 mining titles belonging to the Nigerian Mining Corporation.
6. Gas and oil pipeline should have backup points. We must be able to ship gas or oil to Lagos; after all we ship it to the ends of the world. Our pipe line should be like a Hydra (multi-head monster) that will allow for maintenance without totally shorting down the country.
7. Implement widespread adoption of CFLs (Compact Fluorescent Lights) and other energy saving programs. CFLs save about four times more energy compare to regular lights.
8. Last but not least, industries using gas for energy will be given gas for free or token price.

We are calling on all Nigerians to wear copper colored ribbon (similar to the AIDS ribbon) and March for a Global NNPC with 24 refineries and a 50,000 megawatts power grid. Mr. President since you understand the challenge, we are ready to give you 100% support to make these changes. If the energy issues in Nigeria are solved, a lot of Nigerian lives will be astronomically improved. We call upon all religious, traditional and civic leaders to join Mr. President and 40 days pray and fasting for success.

God Bless Nigeria!!!!



###


Nigerians for Super Energy is a grassroots campaign aimed at supporting the need for energy in Nigeria and the sub region. 35% of all black people in the world need energy to improve the daily lives.

Ochi Dabari
Aug 9, 2007, 05:07 AM
I would be surprised if Yar'Adua, and even Baba, IBB, Buhari, Shonekan, Shagari, Gowon, etc before him did not know all these. There is no incentive to make Nigeria liveable b/c that would end the classification of the society. Can you imagine the almajirin of Katsina State having the same amount of light that Yar'Adua has? Or for that matter, use light from the same source? Or drink from the same tap water? This is what the authors of the above article are suggesting. It is a taboo. The richest people where I am do not own private jets b/c the airlines that are functioning are luxurious enough, and run to time. It is a waste of money for anyone to still own a private jet, for which you would pay parking (hangar) fees. At best, there are private jet companies for them to rent and use; that way, you do not waste your hard-earned money. In Nigeria, our rich people made it from the sweat and misfortune of the people, so they don't flinch when they burn the money. So long they demonstrate class status, they are okay.

ochi

afam
Aug 9, 2007, 06:03 PM
And the bill keeps crashing. I am sure PCHN won't be happy about this.

Just got my latest power bill and it read N304.50.

That is good but the annoying thing is that my actual consumption is just N160.00 whereas as usual they took N100.00 and N30.00 making the total N290.00.

Of course they charged VAT on this amount and I will be coughing out N304.50 to PHCN tomorrow morning before they tell me I didn't pay on time.

And the good thing is that I never have power outages.

Will still look for others ways to further crash this amount until such a time when solar generated electricity won't be considered at all.

Do an energy efficiency program today, replace items that needs replacing and watch your energy requirements go down.

Almost every single appliance you have today has an alternative with a whole lot less power requirement.

Ochi Dabari
Aug 10, 2007, 03:38 AM
Thanks for this contribution, Afam. We want to hear good news from Naija. Did you say there are no outages any more? Where do you live in Nigeria? Apart from the fact that infrastructure is not being maintained in Nigeria, you are right that people use power without consideration for the fact that it is exhaustible. So, you would have a transformer for a large part of town, and people are tapping into it without any plan to pay. My brother in Jos did inform me a few days ago that they are now using pre-paid cards for power consumption. Can this really stop power tapping? Nigerians are ingenious at undoing any protective measure.

You also mentioned the issue of solar. Even overseas, people are turning to this angle, and cutting their bills dramatically. Last year, I visited a Nigerian whose hot water system had blown up, but he did not care, as he had a solar system that was warming his bath water at least. I am sure such a system would cover a good part of the village, where there is not much electrical equipment in use. This was really what Buhari, in charge of the PTF did for the LGs. He installed solar power for the preservation of vaccines and critical medicines. Not a big deal, one would say, but you then had guarantee that the medicines were properly stored. Interestingly, the EVIL ONE (Abacha) made far less money from oil than our saintly Baba did. The difference is really clear - religion is just a yoke, a smokescreen of the Devil.

ochi

nf5kmw1
Aug 10, 2007, 03:55 AM
And the bill keeps crashing. I am sure PCHN won't be happy about this.

Just got my latest power bill and it read N304.50.

That is good but the annoying thing is that my actual consumption is just N160.00 whereas as usual they took N100.00 and N30.00 making the total N290.00.

Of course they charged VAT on this amount and I will be coughing out N304.50 to PHCN tomorrow morning before they tell me I didn't pay on time.

And the good thing is that I never have power outages.

Will still look for others ways to further crash this amount until such a time when solar generated electricity won't be considered at all.

Do an energy efficiency program today, replace items that needs replacing and watch your energy requirements go down.

Almost every single appliance you have today has an alternative with a whole lot less power requirement.

Afam:

Hope you join us in moving the energy campaign for Nigeria and spread the word!!!

The plan Nigerians for Super Energy have calls for energy conservation. I spoke to the world bank people last week and they say the Federal Government is interested in a similar program that was carried out in Ghana. Read more here about some of the more programs http://nigeriansforsuperenergy.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=21&sid=1e60c5da6f9fbd7f5736ece24bf94418

The government also is moving to reduce tariffs.

FG Moves to Cut Electricity Tariffs
By Chika Amanze-Nwachuku, 08.10.2007

Federal Government is putting in place several gas commercialisation and utilisation projects that will ensure the availability of adequate gas for both domestic and commercial use soon.
Speaking last week against the backdrop of inadequate gas supply from the Nigerian Gas Company (NGC) for power generation, Vice President Goodluck Jonathan said the new gas projects were being planned by the government to ensure adequate gas to power the gas turbine plants.
He assured that with the projects in place, electricity consumers will pay low tariffs for the use of power, even as they enjoy uninterrupted power supply.
According to him, aside the Nigeria Liquefied Natural Gas (NLNG), the Brass LNG and the Olokola LNG projects, several others gas gathering plants and Independent Power Plants (IPPs) for domestic power generation are being planned by the government in its commitment to ensuring that consumers pay commercially sustainable tariffs for the use of electricity.
The Vice President, who spoke during the just-concluded 31st annual conference and exhibition of the Society of Petroleum Engineering in Abuja , said incentives had been put in place to encourage private sector investment in the sector adding that government is willing to partner with potential investors in the area of gas.
"Government is committed to ensuring that consumers pay commercially sustainable tariffs for the use of power. This means that consumers will ultimately pay less than they are doing for the alternatives they are struggling with today, as well as ensure uninterrupted supply of power.
"Several gas commercialisation and utilisation projects are ongoing with new ones planned. These include the NLNG, the Brass LNG, Olokola LNG, along with several gas gathering plants and independent power plants (IPPs) for domestic power generation.
"Incentives have been put in place to encourage private sectors investment and government is willing to partner with anyone willing to invest in this sector (Gas Sector)" he said, even as he commended the companies which have invested in the oil and gas sector notwithstanding the challenges that have continued to inhibit the growth of the sector.
The country has been groaning in darkness despite the commissioning of 11 power plants by the immediate past administration.
It was learnt that most of the gas turbine plants were cited far away from their source of raw materials (gas), and are therefore not generating power as the pipes that would carry gas to them are yet to be laid.
In the last few months, the country has experienced shortage of power due to reduction of gas supply to Egbin and Delta Power Stations by the NGC due to condensate evacuation from Utorogu gas station.
The frequent shortage of gas supply to the power stations, often result in load shedding by the Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN). Only last week, the generation output of the two thermal power stations dropped by about 500MW, leading to load shedding by the power company.

afam
Aug 11, 2007, 04:53 PM
Ochi,

The reality is that there is so much hope for the future even though the level of apathy is alarming.

We do not have steady power supply yet in Nigeria but people are beginning to look for meaningful alternatives to experience such.

I use an inverter backup system that takes over when power fails, that way I get to use electricity anytime I want to and at the same time cut down on energy wastage.

The prepaid meters are good as they remove all forms of contact with the PHCN officials that are ever ready to look for avenues to make money from Nigerians.

With the prepaid meters you don't get bills based on estimates neither do you have officials coming to your house or office with a ladder as regards disconnection.

But it does not guarantee that you will have steady supply of power.

Funny enough a lot of Nigerians are just interested in looking for ways to bypass the meter. That is the irony of the whole thing, we deprive PHCN of the much needed revenue while expecting steady supply. At least we should be honest enough to pay for what we use.

@nf5kmw1

Thanks for your comments.

Will visit the link you sent and hopefully the message of conservation of energy will be heard by those that take decisions in this country.

Nigerians waste a lot of energy (I guess its because some don't even pay for the energy to begin with).

It is possible to recover 5/6 of the energy being wasted today in Nigeria (taking bulbs into consideration) by replacing the common 60W bulbs with the energy saving ones rated at 10W. Even at 10W brightness is guaranteed yet consumes so little power.

For now, even with the unreliable power supply properly setup inverter/battery banks can guarantee steady power.

I had toyed with the idea of solar system but when inverter backup systems are providing the much needed steady power in my office and at home then it does not make economic sense for now.

Many thanks for your time.

lumidii
Aug 13, 2007, 08:55 PM
Ochi,

The reality is that there is so much hope for the future even though the level of apathy is alarming.

We do not have steady power supply yet in Nigeria but people are beginning to look for meaningful alternatives to experience such.

I use an inverter backup system that takes over when power fails, that way I get to use electricity anytime I want to and at the same time cut down on energy wastage.

The prepaid meters are good as they remove all forms of contact with the PHCN officials that are ever ready to look for avenues to make money from Nigerians.

With the prepaid meters you don't get bills based on estimates neither do you have officials coming to your house or office with a ladder as regards disconnection.

But it does not guarantee that you will have steady supply of power.

Funny enough a lot of Nigerians are just interested in looking for ways to bypass the meter. That is the irony of the whole thing, we deprive PHCN of the much needed revenue while expecting steady supply. At least we should be honest enough to pay for what we use.

@nf5kmw1

Thanks for your comments.

Will visit the link you sent and hopefully the message of conservation of energy will be heard by those that take decisions in this country.

Nigerians waste a lot of energy (I guess its because some don't even pay for the energy to begin with).

It is possible to recover 5/6 of the energy being wasted today in Nigeria (taking bulbs into consideration) by replacing the common 60W bulbs with the energy saving ones rated at 10W. Even at 10W brightness is guaranteed yet consumes so little power.

For now, even with the unreliable power supply properly setup inverter/battery banks can guarantee steady power.

I had toyed with the idea of solar system but when inverter backup systems are providing the much needed steady power in my office and at home then it does not make economic sense for now.

Many thanks for your time.


I recall my granny once had one of those, about a decade ago, but they were very expensive. It must have been about N200K at the time, and it could only power light bulbs, her fixed wireless phone, and a tiny drinks cooler. Any other appliance would run down the twin heavy duty batteries that stored the energy, which then had to be replaced every 18-24months, and they weren't cheap.

It was all wired up tidily, and easy for anyone to operate by flicking a switch. Just that it was pricey, and out of the reach of the majority. Hope the price has gone down now, with the advent of new technology in power systems.

afam
Aug 14, 2007, 08:21 AM
Sure, the prices are coming down but there is still some work to be done to further reduce the prices.

I have designed an installed backup systems for homes and even ISPs for autonomies ranging from 12hrs to 96hrs (4 days).

So, as long as you have the money to pay for a good battery bank there is basically nothing you cannot connect to the system, it all depends on what you want powered and how long you intend to have them hooked up to the system when utility fails.