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Anonymous Villager
Jun 8, 2007, 01:28 PM
I've always thought I was fit. I don't work out but I look like I do. I got the shock of my life when I received a call from the doctor's office telling me my LDL was unusually elevated.



My doctor told me point blank that I need to start a diet and exercise regimen. I was advised to stay away from fried foods, candy, soda, ice cream, white bread and all the other foods I love and replace them with fruits and vegetables.

I just loaded my freezer up a day ago with some ice cream - Haggen daz, bread and some other foods that didn't make it on my doctor's good food list.

I am scared, how can a size 4 figure 8 woman like myself have high LDL?

Doctors in the house, please recommend some foods for me since I've been told I need a life style change.

Anonymous Villager
Jun 11, 2007, 01:21 PM
I've always thought I was fit. I don't work out but I look like I do. I got the shock of my life when I received a call from the doctor's office telling me my LDL was unusually elevated.



My doctor told me point blank that I need to start a diet and exercise regimen. I was advised to stay away from fried foods, candy, soda, ice cream, white bread and all the other foods I love and replace them with fruits and vegetables.

I just loaded my freezer up a day ago with some ice cream - Haggen daz, bread and some other foods that didn't make it on my doctor's good food list.

I am scared, how can a size 4 figure 8 woman like myself have high LDL?

Doctors in the house, please recommend some foods for me since I've been told I need a life style change.

There's no use trying to get help on this thread. Village dokita na di last place dem dey look.

tatafo
Jun 11, 2007, 07:28 PM
I've always thought I was fit. I don't work out but I look like I do. I got the shock of my life when I received a call from the doctor's office telling me my LDL was unusually elevated.

My doctor told me point blank that I need to start a diet and exercise regimen. I was advised to stay away from fried foods, candy, soda, ice cream, white bread and all the other foods I love and replace them with fruits and vegetables.

I just loaded my freezer up a day ago with some ice cream - Haggen daz, bread and some other foods that didn't make it on my doctor's good food list.

I am scared, how can a size 4 figure 8 woman like myself have high LDL?

Doctors in the house, please recommend some foods for me since I've been told I need a life style change.

Hi AV, I'm surprised that your doctor told you everything else not to eat, without suggesting food to eat. Does your insurance cover working with a Nutritionist? If it does, can you go see one to help you build your food pyramid, after looking at how high your cholesterol level is and going through your family medical history? While I would suggest fruits and vegetables as much as possible in your diets, everyone's BMI and BWI differ, and it would take someone familiar with your chart and some of your history to begin to suggest appropriate staple foods and protein. If you are diabetic or have a history of it in your family, please also try and avoid, sweet fruits, like Pineapple, sweet grapes and apples, and the likes, because their sugar contents are quite high. Try and eat food rich in fiber, also eat a lot of oat meal, and some corn if you like it. But don't miss out on your veggies, believe me they work miracles. I personally like broccoli, and spinach and I think these would help spice up your diet.

I hope this helps.

Anonymous Villager
Jun 11, 2007, 07:44 PM
Hi AV, I'm surprised that your doctor told you everything else not to eat, without suggesting food to eat. Does your insurance cover working with a Nutritionist? If it does, can you go see one to help you build your food pyramid, after looking at how high your cholesterol level is and going through your family medical history? While I would suggest fruits and vegetables as much as possible in your diets, everyone's BMI and BWI differ, and it would take someone familiar with your chart and some of your history to begin to suggest appropriate staple foods and protein. If you are diabetic or have a history of it in your family, please also try and avoid, sweet fruits, like Pineapple, sweet grapes and apples, and the likes, because their sugar contents are quite high. Try and eat food rich in fiber, also eat a lot of oat meal, and some corn if you like it. But don't miss out on your veggies, believe me they work miracles. I personally like broccoli, and spinach and I think these would help spice up your diet.

I hope this helps.

God will bless you a million times over.

Which one is BWI?

tatafo
Jun 11, 2007, 08:05 PM
God will bless you a million times over.

Which one is BWI?

Body Weight Index. It is actually called Better Ideal Weight (BIW) and is basically the same thing as BMI

Anon
Jun 11, 2007, 09:25 PM
Hi AV, I'm surprised that your doctor told you everything else not to eat, without suggesting food to eat. Does your insurance cover working with a Nutritionist? If it does, can you go see one to help you build your food pyramid, after looking at how high your cholesterol level is and going through your family medical history? While I would suggest fruits and vegetables as much as possible in your diets, everyone's BMI and BWI differ, and it would take someone familiar with your chart and some of your history to begin to suggest appropriate staple foods and protein. If you are diabetic or have a history of it in your family, please also try and avoid, sweet fruits, like Pineapple, sweet grapes and apples, and the likes, because their sugar contents are quite high. Try and eat food rich in fiber, also eat a lot of oat meal, and some corn if you like it. But don't miss out on your veggies, believe me they work miracles. I personally like broccoli, and spinach and I think these would help spice up your diet.

I hope this helps.

Gbam Gbam Gbam! Ok to add a bit to what tatafo has above, please if your insurance does not cover a dietitian or a nutritionist, your can build your own food pyramid through the process of food elimination started by your doctor. For instance, you have a list of things not to indulge in. From the listing of what you have in your stocked fridge, I am in total agreement with your doctor that you need a life style change even if you look fit. :lol: Two things about Cholesterol you ought to know from the start, is that it is hard to avoid cholesterol through diet, and Cholesterol can be naturally produced through your family history like Tatafo has alluded to.

Here is my advice: Take out everything that your doctor has said not to eat, and include the following to that list. Eliminate alcohol if you can (except for red wine which is quite good for the heart if taken in moderation), eliminate baked foods as well as much as possible. including cookies, pancakes, donuts, and grilled cheese sandwiches and the likes. If you have to eat baked goods, ensure they do not contain trans fat, this is why I usually suggest less baked goods, infact anything high on calories. and avoid greasy food and butter or margarine.

Then throw in a lot of vegetables in your menu, as much vegetable as you can eat, not over cooked, and as much as possible natural veggies (as in salads and cold slaw). If you can walk a lot, please do so, as a form of exercise, it is most helpful. If you work out, work with a trainer on the types of exercise that will not strain the heart. Then like TTF says, eat food high in fiber-- for breakfast, some wheat like cereals might be fine. The cereal under the brand name cheerios are quite good, Oat meal is also quite good for combating high cholesterol. Then if you cannot eliminate eggs from your diet, you also need to do away with the egg yolk (i.e. yellow part of egg) in your diet and rather eat just the egg whites. Take a lot of yogurt, if you are a yogurt type. Okro is said to be rich in fiber which helps cholesterol too. Use less Palm oil in your food.

One last advice, is that I would not suggest or advice taking any drugs to lower your cholesterol please. Sometimes these drugs merely complicate one’s digestive system. If you can lower your cholesterol by eating right (I cannot emphasize veggies enough), do so. I will really advice that you work with a dietitian if your insurance covers it. You would be much the better for it. The sites below have some useful information. Best of luck

http://www.cholesterolcholestrol.com/ (This looks very useful)
http://www.hpathy.com/health/reischman_cholestrol.asp (I found this very interesting. There are a number of practitioners that agree with this line of thought too.)
http://www.vytorin.com/ezetimibe_simvastatin/vytorin/consumer/sources_of_cholesterol/index.jsp?WT.srch=1&WT.mc_id=Y0330 (Pay no attention to the medication suggested)

sukaoma
Jun 11, 2007, 10:07 PM
Unfortunately lifestyle changes have not proven to be easy to adapt to as much as it is the first line of action. However, you may need medication because atherosclerosis can be IRREVERSIBLE so why take a chance? If after 3 mths, there is no noticeable change in your LDL with lifestyle changes that have been suggested, then there is nothing wrong with adding on atorvastatin (Lipitor) which affects both LDL (decrease) and HDL (increase). What is your baseline LDL by the way, also were you supposed to get a fasting plasma cholesterol level? Did you eat instead of fasting? Cos that can also affect your results. But goodluck anyway with the lifestyle changes

tatafo
Jun 12, 2007, 01:24 AM
Unfortunately lifestyle changes have not proven to be easy to adapt to as much as it is the first line of action. However, you may need medication because atherosclerosis can be IRREVERSIBLE so why take a chance? If after 3 mths, there is no noticeable change in your LDL with lifestyle changes that have been suggested, then there is nothing wrong with adding on atorvastatin (Lipitor) which affects both LDL (decrease) and HDL (increase). What is your baseline LDL by the way, also were you supposed to get a fasting plasma cholesterol level? Did you eat instead of fasting? Cos that can also affect your results. But goodluck anyway with the lifestyle changes

Sukaoma just a quick question, is Lipitor not the one that comes with the FDA and manufacturers warning on the possibility of Liver and Kidney complications? I'm not quite sure again, but I remember a lot of back and forth before this drug was approved with very strong warning labels, but I may be mistaken or is it not the the same one?

Anon
Jun 12, 2007, 11:20 PM
On a more serious note, AV, I hope you are not getting confused on this thread. I will thank Tatafo and Sukoma for both their input because they both raise a lot of salient issues. I also went back to read your request, and saw that your doctor who has all your medical information including your baseline LDL decided that the best course of action for you was a “life style change.” I bet he has more information than we do about you and reached that conclusion based on your records, charts, and the information you gave him. It was based on this that your initial request on this thread was for “Doctors in the house… to recommend some foods for you since you've been told you need a life style change”.

This was why I asked you to ignore the suggested medication in one of the links I posted because it might be bit hasty to push you into medication without full knowledge of your medical history, your medical situation, any pre-existing condition you might have, other drugs that you might currently be on, and your possible predisposition to those drugs. It might even be a bit reckless to prescribe or suggest any sort of medication for you over the internet without all these necessary information. Sukoma is quite right in the sense that life style changes can be hard/difficult to adopt, and I agree, but for you to get better, it still has to be done. There is little sense in continuing to eat the foods you eat currently without any modification while hoping that medication cures you. And should you decide upon the advice and recommendation of your doctor that you cannot lower your cholesterol without the aid of medication, you would still have to engage a life style change that involves a diet and exercise regimen. To do otherwise, would lead to futility in your situation despite every medication. It would be akin to a diabetic continuing with their intake of sugar/starch or carbohydrate, while taking insulin medication in the hope of reducing their blood sugar level.

Your doctor who knows you better than we do, has asked that you change your diet. I therefore encourage you to really start a dietary regimen as a start and try to keep to it. You can start small or start by cutting out the frequency of certain things in your diet like your doctor initially suggested. If however, at any point you feel that some help could be gotten from medication you can explore that option with your doctor as well. Sukoma has also given you a lot of good pointers in terms of the questions and important points you can raise with your doctor if you feel that you cannot go it alone, when next you see him be sure to raise these issues with him, or better still, you can actually call him on the phone and ask him these questions if you want to.

Finally, also, be sure to do your own homework and check out any drugs prescribed for you before accepting it from the doctor. I am really one of those doctors that recommend medication as a last result rather than as a first step. Drugs are only a necessity if and only if there is no other way. Like Tatafo also alluded to I would suggest that you go to the FDA website and do a search for any drug and read the history of the drug, its trials, the side effects, and toxicity effects, the hurdles it faced before being passed by the FDA and what its benefits are, before you take them. Remember drug companies are businesses and exist mainly to make benefits. Also remember that 'your' health is 'your' wealth. Even though doctors are there to help, they know your body not, and certainly not as well as you know do. They work off the information you give them, so always help your doctors, help you.

That is all the advice I have to give you on this thread.

.bebi
Jun 13, 2007, 10:12 AM
My dear AV,don't panic.Its not easy to suddenly change your diet but you can do it by substituting dangerous foods with healthy options.You can start by replacing whole milk if thats what u take with skimmed milk which has virtually all the fat content removed.The liquid type is not easy to take but I find that the powdered type is almost manageable,infact thats what I use and I dont even know if I can use whole powdered milk again.Also having muesli for breakfast is really good and because it contains oat,helps in reducing bad cholesterol levels i.e LDL.It also has a low GI(glycemic index) and so is a slow release food which prevents major fluctuations in your blood glucose and insulin.You can also switch to wholegrain bread,pasta and rice(I dont know if basmati is popular stateside).We can not overemphasise the importance of exercise.It doesnt matter if u r a size 4 or 20,if u live a sedentary life,it doesnt help.
Lifestyle changes have to be made first before jumping to medications.
I hope I have been helpful.

sukaoma
Jun 14, 2007, 05:27 PM
Sukaoma just a quick question, is Lipitor not the one that comes with the FDA and manufacturers warning on the possibility of Liver and Kidney complications? I'm not quite sure again, but I remember a lot of back and forth before this drug was approved with very strong warning labels, but I may be mistaken or is it not the the same one?

Lipitor to the best of my knowledge does not have a "black box" warning on it. But like you rightly said, there is a risk of liver disease/complication which is likely dose related. Patients should get a baseline liver function test, then get them checked every 12 wks while on treatment. If the liver enzymes remain stable after a year or 2, the liver function test can be cut back to semi-annually. The medication should be stopped if liver enzymes are elevated 5 times the upper limit of normal