Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls

My first trip to Saudi Arabia for the performance of Hajj was in 1995. Over the past thirteen years I have performed the holy pilgrimage a few times and so I can conveniently look back and record my observation in terms of the organization and performance of hajj including those developments that makes the performance of hajj today a strenuous exercise.

In 1995 the cost per pilgrim from Nigeria was N42,000.00 (forty two thousand naira) whereas in 2008 the cost averaged N500,000.00 (five hundred thousannaira). The exchange rate in 1995 was N22.00 to One Saudi Riyal but the rate in 2008 is about N40. Whereas there has been 81% increase in exchange rate the percentage increase in the cost of hajj is over 1000%.

The holy pilgrimage, hajj is the fifth and last pillar of the Islamic faith. The activities and rites of hajj can be traced to Prophets Abraham, Ismail, Adam and his wife Hauwa (May Allah's peace and blessings be upon them all).

In the last the last thirteen years, the city of Makkah has transformed in several ways. The bizarre display of opulence, increased trading activities, the increased number of pilgrims as well as the increasing inability of Saudi authorities to cope with the increasing number of pilgrims thereby increasing the strains and pains associated with the performance of hajj are issues which caught my attention . Infact it can be safely averred that certain decisions of the Saudi authorities such as erecting gigantic commercial edifices within the precincts of the Kabbah (the most sacred house in Islamic theology) with the attendant pains and strains on worshippers as they move towards the Kabbah is clearly an error. Perhaps some muslims are beginning to equate worship with "adornments of this world".

I experienced discomforts just as others as the inflicted pains and strains impacted negatively on our spirituality and the proper performance of our rites – even salat was said in unclean street corners and on jam packed streets with anger flying in the air. The admonition of "wala rafasa wala fusuka wala jidala fil hajj' was tested several times by negative environmental and human forces..

It is becoming increasingly clear that the Saudi government requires external assistance from other muslim countries and organizations in order to be able to organize hajj that will inflict less pain on the faithfuls.

Kabbah & its Environs

In those days pilgrims were filled with expectations and anxiety as they approach the Kabbah . The sight of the Kabbah was unmistakable when you arrive there. The elegance and grandeur of the Kabbah clearly marked it out in its environment.

But today the case is different. The Kabbah is ambushed by buildings whose architecture and opulence assault your sensibilities. They are distractions and reminders of worldy possessions.

From the Reea Bahksh area to the Kabbah and from Al-Mansur street to the Kabbah one comes in contact with imposing commercial entities and edifices.

Closely related to these distractions it is unfortunate to observe that while worshippers struggled, shoved and pushed each other for space during prayer times, with some praying on the bridges, rocky hills and dirty street corners (about 300mtrs from the Kabbah) some of these buildings have permanently taken up space that could conveniently sit over 250,000 worshippers. Apart from one of then which makes provision for a praying arena on its first floor, no such provision is made by the other buildings despite the fact that they are sitting right in the backyard of the Kabbah.

As I have stated earlier, these gigantic structures house commercial shopping malls such as KFC, Emirates, The Museum, Rolex, hotels etc. The case of the jewelry shops with their overpowering allurements and adornments which arrest and distract the attention of faithfuls are also worthy of mention. There is a reckless display of opulence. It is doubtful if Islam supports such reckless display of opulence even if it is rightly stated that they are engaged in trading.

It is inconceivable that these malls can be built in such a way as to give the impression that commercial activities (including money changers, eateries, hotels) are more important than the Kabbah. The arena is always jam-packed by shoppers and it is always difficult for the earnest worshippers to have easy access to the Kabbah.

In other words, the entrances to the Kabbah are melting points of confusion as there is a constant and unending competition between worship and commerce. The principles behind the establishment of the commercial malls and that behind the establishment of the Kabbah (as recorded in the Quran) are diametrically opposed that one wonders if it is right to turn the entrances and backyard of the House of Allah to a "den of money changers, manipulators, hoteliers etc) صا

Inside the Kabbah a large proportion of pilgrims were busy taking photographs and engaged in some other forms of amusements even as they performed rites which have spiritual implications and importance. To them Kabbah was just another Disneyland or some live comedy. Where the police banned the use of cameras most of them used their mobile phones. The tragedy is that such pilgrims did not realize that they were going through physical as well as spiritual processes.

Public Utilities

As part of the hajj rites, we move to Mina, Arafat, Muzdallifah. It is to the credit of the authorities in those places that water and public toilets were in abundance (almost every 100metres). These assisted in no small measure in improved hygiene and the reduction in the stress usually associated with such strenuous journey.

However, within the precincts of the Kabbah the toilets have virtually disappeared. Pilgrims either perform their ablution from their hostels/hotels or buy water from corner shops that litter the landscape.

From the two opposing sides of Reea Bakhsh and Al-Mansur (a journey of about 45 minutes) to the Kabbah there is no single place for ablution or water closet. Some pilgrims ended up defeacating in the public near the Kabbah and near the uncompleted sites. Indeed I arrived at the Kabbah at 10am for my first jumat service in the holy land and I had to make additional request to Allah to prevent my bowels from rioting. Thank God my prayer was answered. Where do I get a toilet and how do I get back inside the Kabbah. These were the thoughts going through my mind.

Indeed with so many eateries around the Kabbah one wonders if those who eat will not require water closets to complete the process. Even the proposed new Kabbah has only one slot each for male and female water closets.

Traffic Congestion and Pollution

The absence of public car parks, especially at holy sites, the indiscriminate parking of cars on the roads and the unending fight for right of way between vehicles and pilgrims was another source of unnecessary strain and stress.

It is unbelievable that pilgrims can stay in traffic for over six hours on the Arafat- Muzdallifah road; infact some spent the night inside their buses. The perennial traffic on the roads leading to the Kabbah during prayer times is avoidable. Why should all cars, including those of inhabitants of Makkah be on the road at these peak periods. Some of them even harass us with their old and KIA cars as we struggle to meander through the traffic. And just as you are trying to ensure your safety , the long buses and some caravan-like "jeeps" emit obnoxious and toxic carbons from their exhaust pipes. Indeed it was getting so serious that I was afraid I could suffer seriously in the cardiac area. However, they made me dizzy and suffered minor health problems which made me see our resident doctors

The Saudi Police and their Suzuki jeeps also contributed their own quota to the confusion through incessant and reckless blaring of sirens. These heightened tension and commotion. Only God knows the degree of damage that they have inflicted on the faithfuls.

Conclusion

It is my hope and prayer that the Saudi authorities will look into some of these issues and make amends where necessary so that those who really come to hajj for worship will not lose out in the contest between commerce and spirituality. Efforts should be made to make hajj less strenuous and painful. And this is achievable. Shopping malls should be taken away from holy sites to places where they will not interfere with worshippers who have come to the Kabbah for worship, to circumbulate the Kabbah and to meditate therein.

The Saudis are at liberty to create their own Oxford street and the likes but these should be sited in such a way as not to interfere with the worship of Allah. Afterall every other thing will perish and only His majesty will remain

Finally the Saudi authorities can also seek assistance from other countries with large population such as Indonesia, India etc on crowd control, traffic management and sundry matters.

Wallahu Alam. I am delighted to have performed the pilgrimage as a muslim but our hosts need to make it easier for us.

Thank you for having read this piece.

Taslim Anibaba (FCA) 14th December, 2008



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Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Lateesha posted on 12-14-2008, 20:26:43 PM
QUOTE:
From the two opposing sides of Reea Bakhsh and Al-Mansur (a journey of about 45 minutes) to the Kabbah there is no single place for ablution or water closet. Some pilgrims ended up defeacating in the public near the Kabbah and near the uncompleted sites. Indeed I arrived at the Kabbah at 10am for my first jumat service in the holy land and I had to make additional request to Allah to prevent my bowels from rioting. Thank God my prayer was answered. Where do I get a toilet and how do I get back inside the Kabbah. These were the thoughts going through my mind.


Indeed with so many eateries around the Kabbah one wonders if those who eat will not require water closets to complete the process. Even the proposed new Kabbah has only one slot each for male and female water closets.


When nature calls,we all must answer even in Mecca and Medina
Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Agidimolaja posted on 12-15-2008, 02:06:10 AM
I read your lamentations and felt so sorry for you Moslems especially those that took it upon themselves to go to Mecca.

But having read the frauds, pains and creative sufferings that you highlighted, I laughed and said - good for you all!.

I also asked few questions among of which were;is it not supposed to be Allah's own place?

Why are the Saudi Policemem harrassing you pilgrims?

Why are you people who supposed to be so holy and humble pushing and fighting one another all over the place why trying to gain entrances to your so called sacred centres?

Why has Saudi authority failed to provide adequate facilities and amenities for worldwide pilgrims despite the fact that Saudi Royal Family is sitting upon such huge amount of money?

Why has the price tag of pilgrimage from Nigeria gone so high?Fraud? Yes, it is!

I'm never impressed by Islamic religion and your account is part of my several reasons.

Based upon your painful narrative, one can truthfully conclude that the so called holyland is surely an unholyland. It is a land ofpains, frauds,creative sufferings, make-beliefs, rituals, cheap idolatory etc.
Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Dem posted on 12-15-2008, 02:21:53 AM
If you ask me, the bloke who conceived this yearly enforced pilgrimage to Saudi for Muslims was a genius. What a nice little earner!

I know that there are some 'must dos' for the Islamic faithfuls but, presumably, folks can still get into Heaven without visiting Saudi right?
Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Tunde meee posted on 12-15-2008, 04:19:26 AM
Jazakallahu Khaeran. My first experience was last year and I must say the sight of Ka'abah and the accompanying emotions remains indelible in my brain and I pray to Allah to grant all those willing to visit the Holy Land the ability to do so because it is a one in life time experience. I agree with you that Saudi Authority could have made things easier for us but I still think they are trying their best though not good enough especially in the area of crowd control. As for trade around the Masjid l-haram, I belief there is virtually no way this could be avoided. The only option is to make it illegal which will, in my opinion,only serve the purpose of making aram out of alal for as long as the trade is not conducted in the vicinity of the mosque.
Having said all these, I think the first Hadith of Al Nawawi has summarised and also succeeded in differentiating spiritualitic and materialistic visits to the Holy land." For every action there is an intention and everyone shall be rewarded according to his/her intention. Whoever perform Hijra(hajj) with Allah and His messenger in mind, his/her Hijra shall be for Allah and His messenger. And whoever does same for worldly reason, his/her reward shall be according to the reason for his/her Hijra(hajj)--Prophet Muhammad,SAW(570AD-632AD).
Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Tunde meee posted on 12-15-2008, 04:35:48 AM
[QUOTE=dem;300221]If you ask me, the bloke who conceived this yearly enforced pilgrimage to Saudi for Muslims was a genius. What a nice little earner!
QUOTE]

Exactly what I thought initially until I realise that ascribing such a foresightedness to an illiterate Arab, in the desert and in the period of ignorance is making a god of him.
Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Wayfarer posted on 12-15-2008, 04:50:13 AM
Why doesn't Allah use his mighty power to conduct an efficient Hajj? Why doesn't he do that? Oh, I forgot. He doesn't exist. Entities who don't exist can't do anything. It is a tetstament to the gullibility of human beings that they would spend their hard-earned money for the priviledge of worshipping an inanimate and impotent stone. And Africans, being the gullible lot that we are, we naturally gravitate to such nonsense. Never mind that Mohammed, the presumed savior of mankind, could have chosen our neck of the woods to conduct his redemption from. Naa, that would get in the way of slavishly worshipping something from another culture and another land.

Good point there, Dem.

I don't know why we bother looking for crazy people. If we saw a man on a street corner talking to himself, we would call him crazy. Who is crazier, that man or the one who spends his life savings so that he can mumble mumbo jumbo to a stone and then touch it?

Man is truly not that evolved.
Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Dewdrops posted on 12-15-2008, 04:51:42 AM
QUOTE:


In other words, the entrances to the Kabbah are melting points of confusion as there is a constant and unending competition between worship and commerce. The principles behind the establishment of the commercial malls and that behind the establishment of the Kabbah (as recorded in the Quran) are diametrically opposed that one wonders if it is right to turn the entrances and backyard of the House of Allah to a \"den of money changers, manipulators, hoteliers etc)


Inside the Kabbah a large proportion of pilgrims were busy taking photographs and engaged in some other forms of amusements even as they performed rites which have spiritual implications and importance. To them Kabbah was just another Disneyland or some live comedy. Where the police banned the use of cameras most of them used their mobile phones. The tragedy is that such pilgrims did not realize that they were going through physical as well as spiritual processes.



I think all pilgrimages have become highly commercialized and the significance of enhancing a superior spiritual re-habilitation in people have been lost generally.

As children...my mom...(formerly stauch catholic who does not receive communion anymore) took us to Jerusalem...Israel and to Lourdes in France on 2 notable Christian pilgrimages. I enjoyed them because they reminded me of places where I could get in touch with my spirituality or to know God better.

http://www.lourdes-france.org/index.php?goto_centre=ru&contexte=en&id=405

20 years later.....all 6 of us decided to embark on that pilgrimage to Lourdes in France(deliberate boycott of Israel totally...with all their fight fight).....to rekindle that spirit as on of the last chances of re-discovering God to no avail. On getting to Lourdes in 2002 I believe.....the place was something else. It had been over taken by mega malls and petty street trading.

The sanctuary of Bernadette was a mockery of what it used to be. In short....the place was a more of a commericial tourist attraction with petty thieves allover the place.

On another occasion visiting Rome, Italy...right there in St. Peter's Basilca(The Vatican)....after making it up to the top of the torturous stairs(no elevators) were people waiting to rob you blind as "fellow tourists" or pilgrims. By the time we made it back down.....there were several complaints from fellow "pilgrims" about missing bags and so one with long lines of waiting to cancel credit cards and so on from being robbed in the holiest of places.

I gladly gave up the notion of pilgrimages since I was better off going to the malls or been robbed in my place of residence while I "spiritualized" on my bed!

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/italy/rome-st-peters-basilica.htm


THE WAY OF THE NEW WORLD I GUESS....ALL ABOUT MATERIALISM, NO SPIRITUALITY.

QUOTE:

As part of the hajj rites, we move to Mina, Arafat, Muzdallifah. It is to the credit of the authorities in those places that water and public toilets were in abundance (almost every 100metres). These assisted in no small measure in improved hygiene and the reduction in the stress usually associated with such strenuous journey.


However, within the precincts of the Kabbah the toilets have virtually disappeared. Pilgrims either perform their ablution from their hostels/hotels or buy water from corner shops that litter the landscape.

From the two opposing sides of Reea Bakhsh and Al-Mansur (a journey of about 45 minutes) to the Kabbah there is no single place for ablution or water closet. Some pilgrims ended up defeacating in the public near the Kabbah and near the uncompleted sites. Indeed I arrived at the Kabbah at 10am for my first jumat service in the holy land and I had to make additional request to Allah to prevent my bowels from rioting. Thank God my prayer was answered. Where do I get a toilet and how do I get back inside the Kabbah. These were the thoughts going through my mind.


Indeed with so many eateries around the Kabbah one wonders if those who eat will not require water closets to complete the process.
Even the proposed new Kabbah has only one slot each for male and female water closets


GOOOOOOOOOOOOD LORRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRD!!!!!!

Please thank God for "the other kinds" of religious pilgrimages(choosing ma letters extremely carefully).......hygiene was not a problem at all.

I remember experiencing this nastiness on the airplanes. What memories....never to travel on any air plane around the hajj season.

No need to elaborate...so that some sensitive peeps do not yank off my posts...for simply expressing the fact as they may and throw me into a fit of rage this afternoon.
Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Tunde meee posted on 12-15-2008, 05:19:29 AM
@ Wayfarer,

You want to stand behind the Garden to discover what is in it. Come into the garden, I can assure you we dont worship the black stone. Remember Islam remains the only monotheistic religion, ask your friend who studied Religion.
Re: Hajj 2008: Killing The Spirit Of The Faithfuls
Tanibaba posted on 12-15-2008, 12:08:38 PM
QUOTE:
Jazakallahu Khaeran. My first experience was last year and I must say the sight of Ka'abah and the accompanying emotions remains indelible in my brain and I pray to Allah to grant all those willing to visit the Holy Land the ability to do so because it is a one in life time experience. I agree with you that Saudi Authority could have made things easier for us but I still think they are trying their best though not good enough especially in the area of crowd control. As for trade around the Masjid l-haram, I belief there is virtually no way this could be avoided. The only option is to make it illegal which will, in my opinion,only serve the purpose of making aram out of alal for as long as the trade is not conducted in the vicinity of the mosque.
Having said all these, I think the first Hadith of Al Nawawi has summarised and also succeeded in differentiating spiritualitic and materialistic visits to the Holy land.\" For every action there is an intention and everyone shall be rewarded according to his/her intention. Whoever perform Hijra(hajj) with Allah and His messenger in mind, his/her Hijra shall be for Allah and His messenger. And whoever does same for worldly reason, his/her reward shall be according to the reason for his/her Hijra(hajj)--Prophet Muhammad,SAW(570AD-632AD).


Thanks for the hadith of the Prophet which talks about rewards and intentions. It actually came to my mind and that is the reason why i am not against commerce.
However, the hadith that makes me fear and tremble is that which states that the Prophet was crying and when asked he said there will come a time when there will be so much religiousity but that piety will be absent. I hope we have not gotten to that stage yet in our bid to obliterate spirituality and enthrone materialism.

taslim
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