Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps

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Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell to the Fed House of Reps

By Sheyi Oriade


As various victorious candidates of varying cuts of political cloth celebrate their legislative electoral triumphs and salivate at the opportunities which lie in prospect, one legislator's name is conspicuous by its absence from the roll-call of political victors. The Hon. Patrick Obahiagbon, one of the nation's most colourful and cerebral legislators in the Federal House of Representatives will not be returning to it as a member when it reconvenes in May. This follows his unsuccessful bid to attain the right to represent his political party in last weekend's federal legislative election. The news of his non attainment of this privilege will have come as a surprise to some, a relief to others and a disappointment to many. But such is the drawback and majesty of elective representative government, such that no one is assured a monopoly of representation in the affairs of the people. This can be a good thing or a bad thing depending on the calibre of the politician concerned.

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In surveying the assembly of Federal Representatives for 2007-11, one would struggle to find many of that political intake who towered above Patrick Obahiagbon in the public eye. A collective of elective representatives, notorious for their staging of well publicised festivals of fisticuffs, in which certain members showcased their pugilistic skills to the amusement, astonishment and embarrassment of the nation. Not even the Speaker of the House, with whom, Pat Obahiagbon, shared the distinction of being one of the most visible of that legislative congregation, towered above him. In matter of fact, the Speaker's visibility owed more to his position and the lofty status accorded to it in the national political hierarchy, rather than to the memorability of his contributions to the national political discourse.

In contrast, to the Speaker, he was a stellar performer who was often to be found pontificating grandiloquently on different political matters. Captivating and regaling his audience with his engaging and entertaining style as he offered his diagnoses and prognoses of national political problems.

Admittedly, he was not everyone's favourite drinking potion and for some he was an acquired taste, but for others he was an easy swallow. His preference for, and use of, psychedelic language couched in exoteric and esoteric complexity often concealed kernels of wisdom. Kernels of wisdom embraced by some and dismissed by others.

But his chosen approach may have had more to do with the fact that in performing as he did, he often adopted a role akin to that of ‘the fool' in ancient theatre. But in drawing such an analogy, it is important to point out, that one does not imply or impute or seek to convey the idea that he is, in any way foolish or given to trivialities. He is not. His enactment of such a role in a contemporary political setting was an intelligent way of allowing him to establish the latitude to pronounce upon pertinent political issues of the day without restriction or regard for whose oxen were gored in the process. He positioned himself at the centre of key political debates, leaving the periphery to those who preferred to play it safe, content as they were, with issuing blandishments calculated to curry favour and fortune with those in high political positions.

In commentating on different political issues, he often unveiled refreshing insights. For instance, in his assessment of the performance of the present political system, he was quick to point out that what Nigeria is currently undergoing is civilian rather than democratic rule. It was a rich insight. As the two notions are often conflated and confused as one and the same thing. Nothing could be more erroneous and misleading. Civilian rule in our experience has not been much different from military rule – give or take the difference in costumes of the different masquerades on parade. The corruption, the abuse of power, the proliferation of bank accounts swollen with stolen funds, the general climate of underperformance and non-performance, and the atmosphere of impunity remain integral aspects of our political system, regardless of whether the operatives are uniformed or in mufti.

He, it was, who talked about the palpable lack of ideological underpinnings of the main political parties, to the extent that not much differentiates one from another. These political parties appear buoyed, but are without ideological anchor, bereft as they are of guiding principles and political leitmotifs; they drift aimlessly in uncertain political waters. Most seem bound together by threads of acquisitiveness which tie them to the acquisition of public funds for private benefit.

On the subject of poverty, he pointed out that its debilitating effects were the same regardless of where its victims were from in Nigeria. Thus, pointing out the need for a commonality of action to deal with the root causes of this socio-economic problem regardless of the ethnicity, religious affiliation, or political association of the victims.

During the political impasse regarding the whereabouts and capacity of the late president to discharge his official functions, he spoke out in favour of a swift constitutional resolution of the situation. And when the late president was returned surreptitiously to the country at night, he not only questioned the wisdom of such action, but queried the propriety of involving soldiers in such subterfuge.

In a nation, in which the general tendency has been to ignore the outpourings of its political class, Pat Obahiagbon was successful in arresting the attention of the nation. He raised his head above the parapet, while others in similar positions around him chose to bury theirs in the sand. By his courage, he achieved national recognition beyond the borders of his Oredo Federal Constituency.

In effecting a pause in his political career his political party may have unwittingly done him a favour. It had become clear to observers that he had assumed the proportions of a ‘Gulliver' in ‘Lilliput'. And as such required time to reflect carefully on what platform is best suited to his talents. But, nonetheless, the Federal House of Representatives is the poorer for his absence from its benches.

Wherever his political future leads, I, for one, do not believe that the nation has heard, or seen, the last of him. And if the Grand Geometrician of the Universe has anything to do with it, he will be back before long.

Hon. Pat Obahiagbon, thank you for the memories!

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Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Patcho posted on 04-14-2011, 22:41:30 PM

Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell to the Fed House of Reps


By Sheyi Oriade




As various victorious candidates of varying cuts of political cloth celebrate their legislative electoral triumphs and salivate at the opportunities which lie in prospect, one legislator's name is conspicuous by its absence from the roll-call of political victors. The Hon. Patrick Obahiagbon, one of the nation's most colourful and cerebral legislators in the Federal House of Representatives will not be returning to it as a member when it reconvenes in May. This follows his unsuccessful bid to attain the right to represent his political party in last weekend's federal legislative election. The news of his non attainment of this privilege will have come as a surprise to some, a relief to others and a disappointment to many. But such is the drawback and majesty of elective representative government, such that no one is assured a monopoly of representation in the affairs of the people. This can be a good thing or a bad thing depending on the calibre of the politician concerned.


alt


In surveying the assembly of Federal Representatives for 2007-11, one would struggle to find many of that political intake who towered above Patrick Obahiagbon in the public eye. A collective of elective representatives, notorious for their staging of well publicised festivals of fisticuffs, in which certain members showcased their pugilistic skills to the amusement, astonishment and embarrassment of the nation. Not even the Speaker of the House, with whom, Pat Obahiagbon, shared the distinction of being one of the most visible of that legislative congregation, towered above him. In matter of fact, the Speaker's visibility owed more to his position and the lofty status accorded to it in the national political hierarchy, rather than to the memorability of his contributions to the national political discourse.


In contrast, to the Speaker, he was a stellar performer who was often to be found pontificating grandiloquently on different political matters. Captivating and regaling his audience with his engaging and entertaining style as he offered his diagnoses and prognoses of national political problems.


Admittedly, he was not everyone's favourite drinking potion and for some he was an acquired taste, but for others he was an easy swallow. His preference for, and use of, psychedelic language couched in exoteric and esoteric complexity often concealed kernels of wisdom. Kernels of wisdom embraced by some and dismissed by others.


But his chosen approach may have had more to do with the fact that in performing as he did, he often adopted a role akin to that of ‘the fool' in ancient theatre. But in drawing such an analogy, it is important to point out, that one does not imply or impute or seek to convey the idea that he is, in any way foolish or given to trivialities. He is not. His enactment of such a role in a contemporary political setting was an intelligent way of allowing him to establish the latitude to pronounce upon pertinent political issues of the day without restriction or regard for whose oxen were gored in the process. He positioned himself at the centre of key political debates, leaving the periphery to those who preferred to play it safe, content as they were, with issuing blandishments calculated to curry favour and fortune with those in high political positions.


In commentating on different political issues, he often unveiled refreshing insights. For instance, in his assessment of the performance of the present political system, he was quick to point out that what Nigeria is currently undergoing is civilian rather than democratic rule. It was a rich insight. As the two notions are often conflated and confused as one and the same thing. Nothing could be more erroneous and misleading. Civilian rule in our experience has not been much different from military rule – give or take the difference in costumes of the different masquerades on parade. The corruption, the abuse of power, the proliferation of bank accounts swollen with stolen funds, the general climate of underperformance and non-performance, and the atmosphere of impunity remain integral aspects of our political system, regardless of whether the operatives are uniformed or in mufti.


He, it was, who talked about the palpable lack of ideological underpinnings of the main political parties, to the extent that not much differentiates one from another. These political parties appear buoyed, but are without ideological anchor, bereft as they are of guiding principles and political leitmotifs; they drift aimlessly in uncertain political waters. Most seem bound together by threads of acquisitiveness which tie them to the acquisition of public funds for private benefit.


On the subject of poverty, he pointed out that its debilitating effects were the same regardless of where its victims were from in Nigeria. Thus, pointing out the need for a commonality of action to deal with the root causes of this socio-economic problem regardless of the ethnicity, religious affiliation, or political association of the victims.


During the political impasse regarding the whereabouts and capacity of the late president to discharge his official functions, he spoke out in favour of a swift constitutional resolution of the situation. And when the late president was returned surreptitiously to the country at night, he not only questioned the wisdom of such action, but queried the propriety of involving soldiers in such subterfuge.


In a nation, in which the general tendency has been to ignore the outpourings of its political class, Pat Obahiagbon was successful in arresting the attention of the nation. He raised his head above the parapet, while others in similar positions around him chose to bury theirs in the sand. By his courage, he achieved national recognition beyond the borders of his Oredo Federal Constituency.


In effecting a pause in his political career his political party may have unwittingly done him a favour. It had become clear to observers that he had assumed the proportions of a ‘Gulliver' in ‘Lilliput'. And as such required time to reflect carefully on what platform is best suited to his talents. But, nonetheless, the Federal House of Representatives is the poorer for his absence from its benches.


Wherever his political future leads, I, for one, do not believe that the nation has heard, or seen, the last of him. And if the Grand Geometrician of the Universe has anything to do with it, he will be back before long.


Hon. Pat Obahiagbon, thank you for the memories!



..Read the full article
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Digniphy posted on 04-15-2011, 02:19:24 AM
Indeed, the star of the NASS. He will be greatly missed by every right thinking observer of the NASS. We know he chose to be this great by simply doing that for which he was elected to do, not sit and wait for allowances.
Pat is a great man in words and in deeds. We await his come back most probably on another platform because as it is he was sleeping with strange bedfellows in PDP.
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Joseph Monehin posted on 04-15-2011, 03:28:00 AM
It was sad to learn that the inimitable reprersentative from Edo State will not be returning to the House.
You have earned my respect Pat, and you were more useful to the country than those whose legacies are the inconclusive Power Probes, Peugeot contract scam, the tardiness in declaring Umaru incapacitated, the physical attack on opposition members on the floor of the house, the disregard for court judgements, self-serving amendments to the electoral act, and their eventual humiliation by an unknown aspirant in an election among less than a hundred thousand voters.
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Denker posted on 04-15-2011, 04:06:31 AM
QUOTE:
This is a good read. I was quite saddened when I received news of Pat's none involvement in the coming \\"civilian\\"-cum democratic dispensation. Pat was a burning fibre encased with a steel that's not been submitted to wishes of a red hot fire. The best I read of him is his tribute to irresistible late Chief Gani Fawenmi. Hear him, \"No. No. No. Let somebody tell me this is a huge joke. Am in tears. The grand initiation of Chief Gani Fawehinmi has since brought me emotional laceration and thrown me into a state of utter cataplesy. This was a man who inured himself in the aqua of self abnegation and immolation just to give justice to the down-trodden. Can there be another Gani in Nigeria's legal firmament? I dare say I have my doubts. Chief Gani Fawehinmi was simply inimitable, puritanically committed, inscrutably remonstrative, ideologically transcendental, quixotically cosmopolitan and a ready conveyor-belt for legal tomahawks which he intrepidly deployed in his cascading fulminations against our philistine military and political class. His transition is not just the fall of an Iroko but indeed the grand initiation of an iconic legal salamander. We only hope that we didactically learn herefrom that it is not so much our sybaritic life styles that matters more than the quality of service we render whilst we sojourn on this earth plane.\"

Indolent NASS has lost it's gem. Pat, please, find ways to reach your admirers. You will be back.


....dat bloke is the alpha + omega of supreme queen's language...even our own congi no reach dis iceberg of grammar,
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Jabolondon posted on 04-15-2011, 04:32:07 AM
It is a nice enough writeup about the man but skims over what most suspect was his main failing in the NASS. It's not a bad strategy using some form of unothordoxy to draw attention to your person but the more bombastic he became the more people stepped back and thought "what next?"

For example, how many bills related to his pontifications (poverty, political parties) did he personally sponsor?

To how many bills that could have changed the lives of people did he commit as much energy as his lingoistic outputs?

How many "yeye" motions (such as the NASS members enrichment wuruwuru) did he reject out of hand?

What house committies did he partake in and what was his impact therein?

Finally, no one can convince me anyone associated with that den of thieves (PDP) is not forever compromised in the Nigerian political sphere.
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Tunde meee posted on 04-15-2011, 06:28:46 AM
Many were times I rushed to the Advanced English dictionary with hope to find that he was making his own words up. No, I was wrong all his "igilarity" are there in the dictionary waiting to be memorised by whoever care as much as Pat.
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Benjani posted on 04-15-2011, 09:54:52 AM
Patrick Obahiagbon was a PDP member for 7 years, switched to ACN last year when he saw the the handwriting on the wall.
Thank God his people refused to be fooled.
I am not surprised at all that one Patrick is patting another Patrick in the back.
Why are Nigerians easily shocked and awed by a man full of empty bombasts? Let Obahiagbon go to the university or high school and teach if English is his concern. The people of Igueben send him to the house of Reps to bring them government goodies - roads, schools, hospitals, water. They did not send him there to go and prove once again the black African mentality - trying to speak English better than the English.
Of his eight year in the house, this wanna-be came to lime-light last year or so not because of his achievement for his constituency but for penchant for don gone turenchi.
As @Jabolondon correctly stated, how many bills did he sponsor? He voted for all those ridiculous bills sponsored by PDP. He gleefully joined his fellow Reps to over pay themselves.
Obahiagbon failed his constituency, and praising him to the high heaven stinks to the high heaven. If better used, a quarter of the time he wasted constructing his English jargons would've gotten his people better dividends.
A fashion misfit, he wears his pants on his nipples.
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Danzu posted on 04-15-2011, 10:19:13 AM
I would like to meet with this ebullient Pat, one day. A man who singlehandedly put smily on the face of gruesome Nigerian political face. I love his means, I cherish his tenacity, his direction, his purpose and his delivery. PDP led government has no business in making lives better for Nigerians but for a very very few Nigerians. The charge that he did not contribute any bill to make Nigerians' burden lighter does not hold any weight. The man knew the circus he was in, and the role that was expected of him. He played that role, and for that, many of us will continue to cherish him and hope for his comeback very soon.
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
Dapxin posted on 04-15-2011, 11:15:39 AM
In a sense, he was probably the only good that ever came out of that godforsaken air-conditioned block of mass NASS in abuja....

anyways
Re: Hon Pat Obahiagbon – Farewell To The Fed House Of Reps
UDEMEAKPAN posted on 04-15-2011, 11:50:40 AM
Thank you for this befitting eulogy to the Honorable Patrick Obahigbon, whose bombast has been my secret pleasure, for the years that he has been a legislator.

'Honorable', we will miss your peculiar incoherence, and most importantly, you, Honorable Patrick Obahigbon, stand as an icon of self-generated neologisms, a pathology to some, an art form to others.

We your fans wait on bated breath for your 'second (or is it third) coming', as I predict that the pugilistic chambers of the House of Assembly, will find no quick replacement for you, Obahiagbon.

Your loss at the polls, will only provide you the opportunity, to fortify, enhance and embellish your already bulging verbal arsenal. I predict that you will return to our warm embrace, a man, from whom a rejuvenated armamentarium of verbal-weapons-of-mass destruction will spew forth effortlessly, to our delight and to the bafflement of your, then, less endowed fellow Legislators.

As I bid you farewell, I titillate my memories, for the umpteenth time, with Youtube video clips of your verbal skirmishes at the Chambers of the Federal House of Assembly. In your, now, immortalized Youtube video clips, you take all your viewers and fans on a journey to verbal Nirvana, I shudder, again, both in pleasure and alarm, at your peerless exhibition of incoherence; I reach for my thesaurus, and find it hopelessly inadequate.
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