Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?

If, as Simon Kolawole, asserts recently in his Thisday column, General Ibrahim Babangida is only on an egomaniacal mission to self-construct as "the main issue" in Nigeria's political life, the gap-toothed evil man from Minna must be chuckling in satisfaction. His recent declaration of interest in the 2011 presidential race has transformed our nation-space into one giant Babangidapolis. Our entire commentariat has been operating on overdrive – as if the perceptive Okey Ndibe never warned several weeks ago that it could come to this.

Simon Kolawole is only partly right though. He is somewhat naïve to assume that attention and centrality to our national narrative are all Babangida seeks. There is a sinisterly dark side to Babangida's ego which creates a restless urge to be a living determiner of history. Nigeria and Nigerians are mere instruments in Babangida's urge to self-consecrate as history. He seeks a presidential podium from which to gloat: "when I used the expression, "step aside" instead of step down in 1993, I was talking in full cognizance of the fact that history would one day beckon on me again to lead this nation and I would be left with no choice than to humbly accept the call of history." This is a speech that this silly man has been rehearsing since 1993 in his head and his ego would never surrender to the idea that he wouldn't deliver it one day as President.

This is where the dangers, contradictions, and dilemmas of our current national situation come in. We are held hostage by an ego that can and will only be stopped by the collective will and vigilance of the Nigerian people. But it is also an ego that feeds on and thrives in the attention it gets – no matter how negative. Make no mistake about it – Babangida is enjoying all of this. And he is likely to continue to make one outrageous statement after the other till 2011 – and have Kassim Afegbua issue tepid denials after grabbing the headlines for weeks. That's a strategy and it is working. We cannot ignore such provocations. Yet our frenzied reactions water the man's ego. This is the terrible bind into which Babangida has pushed us. There is more. He is an expensive distraction.

Ask yourself this question: what do we risk as a nation when Babangida works us into a frenzy and we all plug into his mystique – even while attacking him? Think of what happens whenever an opposing team focuses exclusively on and throws all defenders around Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo. They make themselves vulnerable to an orgy of goals by other opportunistic and equally dangerous strikers. By transforming Babangida to the Messi that we need to stop at all costs, are we perhaps overlooking the Zlatan Ibrahimovic that the National Assembly represents?

Babangida is distracting us from the dangers of not completely overhauling the National Assembly come 2011. All things considered, Nigerians have suffered more from being so poorly served by our wholly useless National Assembly since 1999 – and particularly since 2007 – than we have suffered from being equally poorly served by a no less useless federal Executive. The National Assembly has wasted more money than any other arm of government since 2007; they have squandered more opportunities of national growth and rebirth than any other arm of government; they have stolen more money than any other arm of government.

Even at the symbolic level, the National Assembly has been much more disastrous for our national image than any other arm of government. The picture is grim: very few of them – especially David Mark - won the election that got them there in the first place; too many charlatans, motor park touts and certificate forgers – one slapped a security guard and another slapped a female secretary; they traffic in careless, pedestrian statements unbecoming of their station – one fool advised the nation to sacrifice 20 million lives, Ekweremadu wants Mutallab senior to be given a national honour; majority of them are illiterates who have zilch knowledge of parliamentary discourse and procedure – hence the common incidence of a reps and senators who just go there to sleep, wake up after debates, collect their daily quota of Ghana-must-go, and repeat that cycle for four years. And the latest embarrassment is Sani Ahmed Yerima, that silly Taliban from Zamfara, who just bought a 13-year-old Egyptian slave.

One could go on retailing these instances of individual irresponsibility that have made the National Assembly not just the most dysfunctional and indolent arm of government but also the most embarrassing. Their conduct in the Yar'Adua saga – their inability to rise up to the occasion and impeach the man swiftly – should sensitize us all to the dangers of having a mediocre National Assembly. Although they like to sell the myth that as lawmakers, they are not in the position to affect/improve our lives materially and qualitatively like folks in the federal, state, and local government Executives, the truth of the matter is that we suffer very real, concrete, and material consequences from their demission and inactions.

The same type of characters are now benefitting from the Messi-Ronaldo dynamic that Babangida's interest in 2011 has foisted on the country. As the anti-Babangida protests grow louder, snowballing into our exclusive national political praxis and preoccupation, scurrilous characters are prowling every nook and cranny of the country, expressing interest in the Federal House of Representatives and the Senate. Apart from what I've been able to read in the papers about emergent and depressing candidacies, I've been tapping into my networks and connections all over the country to get hands-on information on who is interested in heading to the National Assembly. The news is not good: same people, same structures, same old story.

We are so worried about Babangida that we seem to have forgotten that there is an even greater danger for us in the combination of a Babangida presidency and a dysfunctional, corrupt, and mediocre PDP-controlled National Assembly in 2011. If the combination of Yar'Adua and the National Assembly has been so disastrous for us, just imagine what the combination of Babangida and this National Assembly would be!

Nigerians need to begin to multitask their vigilance and mobilization. The mobilization against Babangida should be matched by an equally zealous mobilization against the sort of National Assembly we currently have. We should sleep with both eyes open – one watching Babangida, the other watching the National Assembly – as we approach 2011. Babangida must be stopped and the composition of the National Assembly must change. You can only do that by paying very close attention to who is going around in your own ward quietly making moves to become your senator or federal rep. If s/he is one of the opposite people, resist him or her with the same zeal with which you are now resisting Babangida. Remember you may see him as just one person but if you accept his money and bag of rice, he will join forces with his ilk in Abuja and you get the sort of National Assembly we currently have!



1 2
Re: Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Shinycoin posted on 04-22-2010, 07:59:46 AM
QUOTE:
Big Bros you don talk am finish...we have to sleep with two eyes open as we approach 2011. But i always ask...where all d credible & qualified people go hide sef Its election time again and if we continue to leave 'election' in the hands of politicians, we would continue in this flop till infinity. #enoughisenoughnigeria.


Y'know, i've asked myself this same question a thousand times and not arrived at any sensible answer. Where are all the credible candidates that could vie for political offices and lead the country in an organized manner?

Evil happens when good people stand by and do nothing...

Where are the university graduates, university professors, lecturers, school teachers, leaders of thoughts in communities and intelligent people than can band together and constitute a driving force of change so necessary to lead our nation out of the doldrums we find ourselves 50 years after independence?

Who is a credible alternative to IBB? Who would emerge and lay claim to the intelligence and forthrightness needed at times like this in our nation's history?

It's because the self proclaimed evil genius has looked at the political horizon of Nigeria and rightly or wrongly concluded that no acceptable alternative exit to challenge him, and that accounts for his confidence and outspokenness, cynicism, disdain and insult to the Nigerian youths and younger generation, and indeed his insult to the entire Nigerian nation, both at home and in diaspora.

So far we only see the same crop of thieves and treasury looters that has been there before in one guise or the other, either as civilians or as military administrators; from the hills of Northern Nigeria, to the valleys of the East of Nigeria, from the swamplands of the south to the savanna of the west of Nigeria; its just the same old ex senators, same ex governors, ex members of the House, ex ministers and other discredited morons who did next to nothing while they served.

In other civilized countries, the media and the people mobilizes, identifies credible individuals and builds a momentum of support and advocacy around these people, strongly urging them to run for offices and extolling their virtues and experience and the maturity they will bring to bear on the office they assume.

Nigeria can and should do the same... widely discredit the looters and morons that has emerged so far and seek out responsible persons we know from our communities that can do the job, both at the local and federal level and let the anti-IBB movement continue!!!
Re: Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Agbonizuanghwe posted on 04-22-2010, 09:36:57 AM
QUOTE:

Evil happens when good people stand by and do nothing...

Where are the university graduates, university professors, lecturers, school teachers, leaders of thoughts in communities and intelligent people than can band together and constitute a driving force of change so necessary to lead our nation out of the doldrums we find ourselves 50 years after independence?


If they exist Nigeria would have some truly successful, truly exemplary public institutions. Poor rulership would then pale into insignificance or be easily challenged
Re: Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Bode Eluyera posted on 04-22-2010, 09:57:12 AM
Thank you for another enlightening and timely article. To be honest with you, recently, I have also started to think of this version - which I think is even likely to be true. In any case, we need to take into consideration all versions and PREPARE VERY WELL for them so that we won't be caught on awares. Details of my proposals will be provided in my article. Keep up the good job.
Re: Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Gun ho commando posted on 04-22-2010, 10:47:25 AM
QUOTE:
Why do Nigerians insist on ascribing some kind of mythical attributes to this fellow. He is just another politician on the make, not a particularly honourable one given his antecendents and continued play for relevance.

IBB this, IBB that, like he sits right next to Zeus on Olympus. He can only be as powerful as you the people choose to make him. Why pray tell, should he not be allowed to fade into insignificance as he deserves? How in the scheme of things does he remain relevant, either as a detractor or even a protagonist? I'd say feed the man pap and put him out to graze. He had his chance and made nought of it. Nigeria actually became worse and his policies sent most of you into voluntary exile although many choose to blame Abacha


This man, IBB, ca only be driven into oblivion through the present hues and cries of Nigerians. There is no doubt IBB believes the rest of Nigeria is made up of fools. Imagine his kite of True Federalism on which to ride to power this time!

To help make IBB fade away and possibly be made to pay for his sins in future, Nigeians must now:
(1) Organise NO-TO-IBB rallies all over Nigeria and beyond.
(2) shift their focus on the PDP to ensure the Ogbulafors of the party adhere to internal party democracy in the party's choice of candidates for the 2011 elections.
(2) Ensure that when M. Iwu is gone - and he needs to go even though he is not the major cause of Nigeria's election woes - and if the National Assembly insists the President must appoint his successor, there must be no 'wururu' in the process; a candidate apparently acceptable to most of the political parties needs to be appointed.
Attracting & keeping the right persons at the right places in Nigeria.
M. Akosa posted on 04-22-2010, 14:54:27 PM
QUOTE:
Y'know, i've asked myself this same question a thousand times and not arrived at any sensible answer. Where are all the credible candidates that could vie for political offices and lead the country in an organized manner?

Evil happens when good people stand by and do nothing...

Where are the university graduates, university professors, lecturers, school teachers, leaders of thoughts in communities and intelligent people than can band together and constitute a driving force of change so necessary to lead our nation out of the doldrums we find ourselves 50 years after independence?

Who is a credible alternative to IBB? Who would emerge and lay claim to the intelligence and forthrightness needed at times like this in our nation's history?

It's because the self proclaimed evil genius has looked at the political horizon of Nigeria and rightly or wrongly concluded that no acceptable alternative exit to challenge him, and that accounts for his confidence and outspokenness, cynicism, disdain and insult to the Nigerian youths and younger generation, and indeed his insult to the entire Nigerian nation, both at home and in diaspora.

So far we only see the same crop of thieves and treasury looters that has been there before in one guise or the other, either as civilians or as military administrators; from the hills of Northern Nigeria, to the valleys of the East of Nigeria, from the swamplands of the south to the savanna of the west of Nigeria; its just the same old ex senators, same ex governors, ex members of the House, ex ministers and other discredited morons who did next to nothing while they served.

In other civilized countries, the media and the people mobilizes, identifies credible individuals and builds a momentum of support and advocacy around these people, strongly urging them to run for offices and extolling their virtues and experience and the maturity they will bring to bear on the office they assume.

Nigeria can and should do the same... widely discredit the looters and morons that has emerged so far and seek out responsible persons we know from our communities that can do the job, both at the local and federal level and let the anti-IBB movement continue!!!



Shiny,

The simple answer to that big naija headache are;
*Federal character
*Quota
*Tribalism and ethnic sentiments
*Endemic corruption (the order of the day)

Personally I enjoy public services, and would infact encourage all of my children to go into public services one way or another, in any of their chosen careers, even though I am also a very shrewd and successful business woman too. To also give back or be there for others, while being blessed is one of my greatest values.
But honestly for me, that naija something (public services) is a bad rash.

While over here in diaspora, I am also affected by the similar negative factors that stiffles the best in an individual, but the good news is that there are also laws, policies and the rules of the game, that supports, promotes and advances persons like me, no matter what the majority population or popular interests think.

I am already now used to meeting with, or working with people who just have a hard time (serious issues) accepting my presence, contributions or position. But too bad for them, as the law of the land says otherwise.
Unlike for my kind in Nigeria.
Re: Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Akigbemaru posted on 04-22-2010, 15:01:49 PM
Thanks for your informative write-up. We all need to be at alert at this time and make sure we uncheck the vernal politicians.
Re: Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Felix posted on 04-22-2010, 16:16:50 PM
Great observation. For sometime now I have been wondering too; is this guy serious? He is supposed to be the maradonna of Nigerias politics right? So why jump into the fray seemingly unprepared many times? Or do we normally make the mistake of crediting him with too much political sophistication simply because he was able to manipulate everybody while in power, utilizing the corrupt lucre associated with state apparatus then? I mean several times in the past election periods, Babangida will rear his ugly head, make all kinds of noise, campaign like he is serious and then before you know it, he will fizzle back to his hill top mansion pretending either to be disinterested again or to have been shouted down by popular resistance. He has repeated this behavior for several times and in each occasion , the result has followed this same pattern. Just like Prof Utomi , one is warry to term it a coincedence, I am starting to suspect his ultimate motive too. Yet, I don't think he makes all these noise because of the senatorial elections. Senatorial elections in Nigeria are much easier to rig without drawing much attention while senators seem to pass through a very corrupt process during the primaries that anybody that gets to represent a party like PDP is most likely as corrupt or even willing to "out-corrupt" Babangida himself.


My suspicion is that Babangida knows how well he is loathed by Nigerians but like Obasanjo, he is willing to 'sacrifice' himself by expending a bit of political capital just for the benefit of class preservation. So they will come together at the wee hours of the night somewhere in one of their glittering mansions and decide that it is Umaru who would be president. But in order to make it look like there was a contest or skirmish amongst them, this evil jumps into the contest, moving from one place to the other, making inflammatory statements while drawing all the attention as usual. We will all be busy pouring scorn on him and by the time he says something like "I am too old for this job" or that " Umaru is my younger brother and I want to leave for the younger generation" , everybody is exasperated and it is already election day. The real guy that was designated to take over the duty of ruining our lives for the next 4 or 8 years will not get the scrutiny nor attention he deserves and once he is already elected and Babangida safely back at his mansion , the press turn the mantra into ; "safeguarding our nascent democracy". We beat our chest;'Umaru is better than the evil in Minna so lets give him a chance to 'perform'' We are the 'winners' , afterall he is back at his house in minna?!
Re: Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Bamaguje posted on 04-22-2010, 17:23:26 PM
QUOTE:
Where are all the credible candidates that could vie for political offices and lead the country in an organized manner?
Evil happens when good people stand by and do nothing...

The upright "credible" candidates like the late Gani Fawehinmi, Pat Utomi and Balarabe Musa presented themselves but couldn't win because of the corrupt nature of our pseudo-democracy, which is more about rigging than about voting.

"Winning" an election requires hiring thugs, bribing INEC officials, sucking up to godfathers; settling village elders, traditional rulers and other power brokers.
Thus in the process of running for office, upright Nigerians get corrupted. They loose focus, direction and morals.

We need a revolution to wipe out the corrupt political class, so we can start afresh.
Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Pius Adesanmi posted on 04-22-2010, 19:35:57 PM

If, as Simon Kolawole, asserts recently in his Thisday column, General Ibrahim Babangida is only on an egomaniacal mission to self-construct as "the main issue" in Nigeria's political life, the gap-toothed evil man from Minna must be chuckling in satisfaction. His recent declaration of interest in the 2011 presidential race has transformed our nation-space into one giant Babangidapolis. Our entire commentariat has been operating on overdrive – as if the perceptive Okey Ndibe never warned several weeks ago that it could come to this.


Simon Kolawole is only partly right though. He is somewhat naïve to assume that attention and centrality to our national narrative are all Babangida seeks. There is a sinisterly dark side to Babangida's ego which creates a restless urge to be a living determiner of history. Nigeria and Nigerians are mere instruments in Babangida's urge to self-consecrate as history. He seeks a presidential podium from which to gloat: "when I used the expression, "step aside" instead of step down in 1993, I was talking in full cognizance of the fact that history would one day beckon on me again to lead this nation and I would be left with no choice than to humbly accept the call of history." This is a speech that this silly man has been rehearsing since 1993 in his head and his ego would never surrender to the idea that he wouldn't deliver it one day as President.


This is where the dangers, contradictions, and dilemmas of our current national situation come in. We are held hostage by an ego that can and will only be stopped by the collective will and vigilance of the Nigerian people. But it is also an ego that feeds on and thrives in the attention it gets – no matter how negative. Make no mistake about it – Babangida is enjoying all of this. And he is likely to continue to make one outrageous statement after the other till 2011 – and have Kassim Afegbua issue tepid denials after grabbing the headlines for weeks. That's a strategy and it is working. We cannot ignore such provocations. Yet our frenzied reactions water the man's ego. This is the terrible bind into which Babangida has pushed us. There is more. He is an expensive distraction.


Ask yourself this question: what do we risk as a nation when Babangida works us into a frenzy and we all plug into his mystique – even while attacking him? Think of what happens whenever an opposing team focuses exclusively on and throws all defenders around Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo. They make themselves vulnerable to an orgy of goals by other opportunistic and equally dangerous strikers. By transforming Babangida to the Messi that we need to stop at all costs, are we perhaps overlooking the Zlatan Ibrahimovic that the National Assembly represents?


Babangida is distracting us from the dangers of not completely overhauling the National Assembly come 2011. All things considered, Nigerians have suffered more from being so poorly served by our wholly useless National Assembly since 1999 – and particularly since 2007 – than we have suffered from being equally poorly served by a no less useless federal Executive. The National Assembly has wasted more money than any other arm of government since 2007; they have squandered more opportunities of national growth and rebirth than any other arm of government; they have stolen more money than any other arm of government.


Even at the symbolic level, the National Assembly has been much more disastrous for our national image than any other arm of government. The picture is grim: very few of them – especially David Mark - won the election that got them there in the first place; too many charlatans, motor park touts and certificate forgers – one slapped a security guard and another slapped a female secretary; they traffic in careless, pedestrian statements unbecoming of their station – one fool advised the nation to sacrifice 20 million lives, Ekweremadu wants Mutallab senior to be given a national honour; majority of them are illiterates who have zilch knowledge of parliamentary discourse and procedure – hence the common incidence of a reps and senators who just go there to sleep, wake up after debates, collect their daily quota of Ghana-must-go, and repeat that cycle for four years. And the latest embarrassment is Sani Ahmed Yerima, that silly Taliban from Zamfara, who just bought a 13-year-old Egyptian slave.


One could go on retailing these instances of individual irresponsibility that have made the National Assembly not just the most dysfunctional and indolent arm of government but also the most embarrassing. Their conduct in the Yar'Adua saga – their inability to rise up to the occasion and impeach the man swiftly – should sensitize us all to the dangers of having a mediocre National Assembly. Although they like to sell the myth that as lawmakers, they are not in the position to affect/improve our lives materially and qualitatively like folks in the federal, state, and local government Executives, the truth of the matter is that we suffer very real, concrete, and material consequences from their demission and inactions.


The same type of characters are now benefitting from the Messi-Ronaldo dynamic that Babangida's interest in 2011 has foisted on the country. As the anti-Babangida protests grow louder, snowballing into our exclusive national political praxis and preoccupation, scurrilous characters are prowling every nook and cranny of the country, expressing interest in the Federal House of Representatives and the Senate. Apart from what I've been able to read in the papers about emergent and depressing candidacies, I've been tapping into my networks and connections all over the country to get hands-on information on who is interested in heading to the National Assembly. The news is not good: same people, same structures, same old story.


We are so worried about Babangida that we seem to have forgotten that there is an even greater danger for us in the combination of a Babangida presidency and a dysfunctional, corrupt, and mediocre PDP-controlled National Assembly in 2011. If the combination of Yar'Adua and the National Assembly has been so disastrous for us, just imagine what the combination of Babangida and this National Assembly would be!


Nigerians need to begin to multitask their vigilance and mobilization. The mobilization against Babangida should be matched by an equally zealous mobilization against the sort of National Assembly we currently have. We should sleep with both eyes open – one watching Babangida, the other watching the National Assembly – as we approach 2011. Babangida must be stopped and the composition of the National Assembly must change. You can only do that by paying very close attention to who is going around in your own ward quietly making moves to become your senator or federal rep. If s/he is one of the opposite people, resist him or her with the same zeal with which you are now resisting Babangida. Remember you may see him as just one person but if you accept his money and bag of rice, he will join forces with his ilk in Abuja and you get the sort of National Assembly we currently have!



..Read the full article
Re: Is Babangida More Dangerous As A Distraction?
Emenanjo posted on 04-22-2010, 19:35:57 PM

If, as Simon Kolawole, asserts recently in his Thisday column, General Ibrahim Babangida is only on an egomaniacal mission to self-construct as "the main issue" in Nigeria's political life, the gap-toothed evil man from Minna must be chuckling in satisfaction. His recent declaration of interest in the 2011 presidential race has transformed our nation-space into one giant Babangidapolis. Our entire commentariat has been operating on overdrive – as if the perceptive Okey Ndibe never warned several weeks ago that it could come to this.


Simon Kolawole is only partly right though. He is somewhat naïve to assume that attention and centrality to our national narrative are all Babangida seeks. There is a sinisterly dark side to Babangida's ego which creates a restless urge to be a living determiner of history. Nigeria and Nigerians are mere instruments in Babangida's urge to self-consecrate as history. He seeks a presidential podium from which to gloat: "when I used the expression, "step aside" instead of step down in 1993, I was talking in full cognizance of the fact that history would one day beckon on me again to lead this nation and I would be left with no choice than to humbly accept the call of history." This is a speech that this silly man has been rehearsing since 1993 in his head and his ego would never surrender to the idea that he wouldn't deliver it one day as President.


This is where the dangers, contradictions, and dilemmas of our current national situation come in. We are held hostage by an ego that can and will only be stopped by the collective will and vigilance of the Nigerian people. But it is also an ego that feeds on and thrives in the attention it gets – no matter how negative. Make no mistake about it – Babangida is enjoying all of this. And he is likely to continue to make one outrageous statement after the other till 2011 – and have Kassim Afegbua issue tepid denials after grabbing the headlines for weeks. That's a strategy and it is working. We cannot ignore such provocations. Yet our frenzied reactions water the man's ego. This is the terrible bind into which Babangida has pushed us. There is more. He is an expensive distraction.


Ask yourself this question: what do we risk as a nation when Babangida works us into a frenzy and we all plug into his mystique – even while attacking him? Think of what happens whenever an opposing team focuses exclusively on and throws all defenders around Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo. They make themselves vulnerable to an orgy of goals by other opportunistic and equally dangerous strikers. By transforming Babangida to the Messi that we need to stop at all costs, are we perhaps overlooking the Zlatan Ibrahimovic that the National Assembly represents?


Babangida is distracting us from the dangers of not completely overhauling the National Assembly come 2011. All things considered, Nigerians have suffered more from being so poorly served by our wholly useless National Assembly since 1999 – and particularly since 2007 – than we have suffered from being equally poorly served by a no less useless federal Executive. The National Assembly has wasted more money than any other arm of government since 2007; they have squandered more opportunities of national growth and rebirth than any other arm of government; they have stolen more money than any other arm of government.


Even at the symbolic level, the National Assembly has been much more disastrous for our national image than any other arm of government. The picture is grim: very few of them – especially David Mark - won the election that got them there in the first place; too many charlatans, motor park touts and certificate forgers – one slapped a security guard and another slapped a female secretary; they traffic in careless, pedestrian statements unbecoming of their station – one fool advised the nation to sacrifice 20 million lives, Ekweremadu wants Mutallab senior to be given a national honour; majority of them are illiterates who have zilch knowledge of parliamentary discourse and procedure – hence the common incidence of a reps and senators who just go there to sleep, wake up after debates, collect their daily quota of Ghana-must-go, and repeat that cycle for four years. And the latest embarrassment is Sani Ahmed Yerima, that silly Taliban from Zamfara, who just bought a 13-year-old Egyptian slave.


One could go on retailing these instances of individual irresponsibility that have made the National Assembly not just the most dysfunctional and indolent arm of government but also the most embarrassing. Their conduct in the Yar'Adua saga – their inability to rise up to the occasion and impeach the man swiftly – should sensitize us all to the dangers of having a mediocre National Assembly. Although they like to sell the myth that as lawmakers, they are not in the position to affect/improve our lives materially and qualitatively like folks in the federal, state, and local government Executives, the truth of the matter is that we suffer very real, concrete, and material consequences from their demission and inactions.


The same type of characters are now benefitting from the Messi-Ronaldo dynamic that Babangida's interest in 2011 has foisted on the country. As the anti-Babangida protests grow louder, snowballing into our exclusive national political praxis and preoccupation, scurrilous characters are prowling every nook and cranny of the country, expressing interest in the Federal House of Representatives and the Senate. Apart from what I've been able to read in the papers about emergent and depressing candidacies, I've been tapping into my networks and connections all over the country to get hands-on information on who is interested in heading to the National Assembly. The news is not good: same people, same structures, same old story.


We are so worried about Babangida that we seem to have forgotten that there is an even greater danger for us in the combination of a Babangida presidency and a dysfunctional, corrupt, and mediocre PDP-controlled National Assembly in 2011. If the combination of Yar'Adua and the National Assembly has been so disastrous for us, just imagine what the combination of Babangida and this National Assembly would be!


Nigerians need to begin to multitask their vigilance and mobilization. The mobilization against Babangida should be matched by an equally zealous mobilization against the sort of National Assembly we currently have. We should sleep with both eyes open – one watching Babangida, the other watching the National Assembly – as we approach 2011. Babangida must be stopped and the composition of the National Assembly must change. You can only do that by paying very close attention to who is going around in your own ward quietly making moves to become your senator or federal rep. If s/he is one of the opposite people, resist him or her with the same zeal with which you are now resisting Babangida. Remember you may see him as just one person but if you accept his money and bag of rice, he will join forces with his ilk in Abuja and you get the sort of National Assembly we currently have!



..Read the full article
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