Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers

The recent report that the Lagos state government had shut down four strip clubs around Opebi Street and Allen Avenue in Lagos made headlines and elicited naughty guffaws from people as such stories are wont to do. According to the report, the Lagos State Environmental and Special Offences Monitoring Unit, which sacked the clubs, whisked off 33 of the nude dancers and two of their managers. Governor Fashola, a man many of us admire, was apparently forced to act following the protest of religious leaders at the increasing number of strip tease and nude clubs in the city. Cardinal Anthony Okogie, the Catholic Archbishop of Lagos, was quoted as saying that the rapid increase in the number of nude clubs was a sign that evil had descended on the city and asked the Governor to sack the clubs.

While the Lagos State Government has the right to take measures that it believes will preserve the public good, there is a feeling that the issues involved with strip and nude clubs are not as simple as presented by religious leaders. In a secular, plural and democratic society, an issue like this, however morally repugnant one feels about it, deserves at least a public discussion - as done in many of the countries we often look up to as models of democracy and freedom.

Several arguments used to justify a clampdown on sexually explicit expressions in public places:

One, is the morality argument. Traditionally states have always felt a need to suppress or at least strongly regulate sexually explicit expressions in order to maintain ‘morality' and ‘standards of decency'. The primary concern of the moralists appears to be that sexually explicit expressions could undermine moral values and the institution of marriage. The British lawyer, judge and jurist, Lord Devlin, articulated this view in his book, The Enforcement of Morals (1965). Lord Devlin argued that since a shared set of basic moral values is essential to a society, public authorities are justified in protecting the society against attacks on these values - such as mounted by pornography and nude dancing.

Opponents of a clampdown however counter that in a plural society, any consensus or ‘moral glue' regarding sexual attitudes has either disappeared or is rapidly disappearing. In other words, they posit that the argument that nude dancing will endanger morals is untenable in a society where the notion of sexual morality is increasingly becoming contentious.

Opponents of a clampdown also contend that the ‘enforcement of morality' argument neglects the ‘moral autonomy' of individuals, namely that it is up to individuals, not the state, to make their own moral decisions on whether they should go and patronise nude clubs or not. They equally argue that a clampdown disrespects the fundamental right of nude dancers over their bodies, especially in a secluded area where people are not forced to watch.

Two, nude dancing has also been criticised from a feminist perspective. The argument here is that permitting sexually explicit expressions such as nude dancing or pornography would amount to a damaging attack on the dignity of womanhood. It is also argued that sexually explicit expressions often have a coded ideological message, namely that the woman is a mere object of gratification.

Supporters of nude dancing however counter that if explicit sexual expressions embody a ‘political message' as contended by feminists, then it will be wrong for the state to suppress it since such ideological expressions, as unpalatable as they may appear to some, are contributions to the marketplace of ideas that enrich democracy.

Three, critics of nude dancing equally argue that the images people are exposed to bear a causal relationship to their behaviour, implying that permitting nude dancing and strip tease clubs would encourage promiscuity or aggression towards women in the society. Those against a clampdown however rebut this, arguing that if this line of reasoning is stretched, it would also mean banning many films and TV shows as well as sports that depict violence such as boxing and wrestling, since they would apparently also promote violence in the society. They further argue that the offence nude dancing may cause to some is sometimes misconstrued to be a damage it will do.

Additionally, opponents of a ban accuse the state of ‘selective justice'. They argue that the wide availability of pornography on the internet and semi pornography magazines as well as the ubiquity of pop videos featuring scantily dressed females and male dancers show that the society is quite thoroughly saturated with sexuality in a commodified form. So, why pick on nude dance clubs, they argued?

In the US, court decisions on nude dancing tend to be contentious, especially when presented as an artistic expression that deserves a First Amendment protection. For instance in September 2008, a judge in Des Moines, Iowa, USA, ruled in favour of a nude dancing club owner charged with violating Iowa's indecent exposure law. The case concerned a 17-year-old niece of the local Sherriff, Steven MacDonald, who danced nude at a club. The club owner, Clarence Judy, was charged with violating Iowa's public indecent exposure law. Judy's lawyer contended that: "Dance has been considered one of the arts as is sculpture, painting and anything else like that. What Clarence has is a club where people can come and perform." The judge ruled that prosecutors failed to prove that the strip club does not qualify as a theatre because Iowa law allows nudity at theatres, museums and other venues devoted to the arts or theatrical performances. The judge further argued: "Given the First Amendment implications of a statute that may limit expression, it is not the role of the Court to judge the taste or quality of the art represented at Shotgun Geniez when determining whether or not it is a theatre."

Even when the courts have ruled in favour of local obscenity or indecency laws, it has often been split decisions. In 2000 for instance, the Supreme Court ruled by 6-3 to broaden the authority of the state of Pennsylvania to regulate sexually expressive conduct. At issue in the case was an ordinance from the city of Erie, Pennsylvania, banning public nudity and requiring dancers in adult clubs to don at least pasties and a G-string before appearing on stage. In 1998, Pennsylvania's top court struck down the ordinance, rejecting the city's argument that the nude dancing ban was justified to combat crime. The Supreme Court reversed that decision in March 2000. In criticising the Supreme Court ruling, The New York Times argued: "Dancing in the nude, like other forms of dance, is an expressive activity that conveys a distinct artistic message warranting free-speech protection."

The above would suggest that in a plural society such as Lagos, banning nude dancing on the say-so of religious leaders, however much we respect them, could amount to imposing a particular form of morality on all. The clampdown could also possibly infringe on the rights of the nude dancers and the club owners.

________________________

Jideofor Adibe, PhD, LLM,(pcjadibe@yahoo.com) is editor of the multidisciplinary journal African Renaissance, and publisher of the London-based Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd (www.adonis-abbey.com). He is also the CEO of Holler Africa! (www.hollerafrica.com), a public relations, polling and image management firm.



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Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Bode Eluyera posted on 01-14-2010, 21:38:31 PM
STOP PROMOTING PROSTITUTION AND LOW MORAL VALUES IN THE NAME OF DEMOCRACY AND PLURALISM!!!

It is very unfortunate, or will it be better to say a TRAGEDY that somebody like you, who is well read and exposed should be advocating for and promoting PROSTITUTION publickly in the name of democracy. In my opinion, I think FAKE INTELLECTUALS like you, who have not just forgotten about their African roots, culture and heritage, but are disassociating themselves from it, pose a serious threat to the MORAL UPRIGHTNESS of our society.

I am in support of democracy, plurasim of opinion, e.t.c. but not to the extent of condolling, promoting nudity and prostitution in the name of entertainment or freedom. I assume that one of the major responsibilities of a journalist is to enlighten and guide the people. In your case, you have chosen to lead Africans astray all in the name of God knows what. I don't think that it is healthy for Africans to emulate everything from the so called BARBARIC western culture just to show/prove that we are also civilised. This is the major difference between me and you. I studied, live and work in Europe, but deep in my heart, I remain an Africanist - who is proud of Africa's rich culture and tradition.

This is why the Japanese and the Asians in general are fairing much better than us. Despite the fact that they have embraced western education - if we can really say so - nevertheless they are proud of their culture and go to any length to protect it.

I have visited some of these nude clubs too. But I am CATEGORICALLY AGAINST replicating them in Lagos or anywhere in Nigeria/Africa simply because dancing naked is not our culture! Very soon, before we say Jack Daniels, you will start writing in defense of HOMOSEXUALS, LESBIANS AND SEX TRANSPLANTS IN AFRICA. The Yorubas have a proverb that goes thus "Were dun wo loja, kose bi lomo." Translation: 'It is fun watching how a mad man displays in the market, but you don't pray to have him as your son/daughter.' If dancing naked is part of civilization and freedom - then I pray that we should remain uncivilised. We don't need that kind of civilization in Nigeria/Africa.

Will you be happy if your daughter, sister and/or wife strips themselves naked and start dancing in the public? Personally, I will kill my daughter if she does anything that like that and I can never have any serious relationship with a strip dancer talkless of marrying her. I don't know much about the Ibo culture - judging by name, it seems to me that you are Igbo - but dancing naked is against the Yoruba culture!!!

Therefore, I support governor Fashola for closing down the club!!! As a matter of fact those girls and the owners of the club ought to be flogged very well too to teach them some moral lessons.


You should cover your face in shame for writing this baggage in the name of journalism or democracy.

If it was within my power, I will strip you naked in Tinubu square and give you 100 lashes of koboko for this gabage that you have written. Don't ever come near me if you don't want to be in trouble. You are an educated illiterate who has an upside-down knowledge of how Africa should be vis a vis the west. After reading your article, I lost any interest in visiting your site. I was just wondering what you would had written if you don't have a ph.D? Perhaps you would have proposed that our girls should be going to school and the swimming pool without their pants!

WHICH KIND YEYE JOURNALIST BE THIS SELF!
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Pcjadibe posted on 01-15-2010, 06:56:39 AM
Thanks Bode for your emotionally-laden comments. My name is Jideofor Adibe. I am the author of the article.

1) People who believe in one line of argument and who do not want to even entertain an opposing line of view are described as ‘fanatics', and I am sure you are not one - despite the emotional flourishes in your write-up. Kindly google Ngozi Chimamanda Adichie's, ‘The Danger of a Single Story'


2) I am happy to note that you also live in Europe. A hallmark of any society regarded as ‘stable' is tolerance – including for groups that some will regard as offensive such as racist groups like the British National Party,strip clubs, etc. These groups are allowed to legally exist because it is feared that to suppress them will drive their ideas underground, which will make them more dangerous. More importantly, it is believed that to suppress them will abridge their free speech rights, which is regarded as the foundation of democracy. In many democracies such as US and UK, because of the importance of free speech as the foundation of democracy, ideas, including those we find obscene or obnoxious, can only be suppressed if they are proven to pose ‘real and immediate danger' to the society.

3) It is wrong to argue that Africa is so different that practices, such as tolerance, that have helped other countries to co-exist despite the differences in their own society cannot work in ours. For years, we used this alleged uniqueness of Africa to dismiss ideas like freedom, good governance or democracy or to rationalise practices that benefit a few. Intolerance is at the root of religious insurrections, terrorism, and ethnic strifes.

4) I am happy to read that you also live in the UK (I guess both of us are in self-imposed exile for reasons best known to us). In the UK and US fanatics are regarded as a greater threat to society than any idea they try to defend because they have no qualms inflicting damages on people who espouse ideas they don't like or even taking life to defend a spurious idea. It is for this reason that they are often placed on the watch list in both countries. You have just mentioned that if you have your way, you will have me flogged in public. There are also many people in the UK, who, if they have their way, will have us deported or even killed – just because we look different. Another name for this is bigotry. If you publish the sort of vituperations you wrote here in any British medium, you will be placed on a watch list, and most likely will be visited by the police for ‘uttering a threat in writing'

5) The price of liberty is eternal freedom. There are societies that do not even allow love songs because of fears that it will give certain urges to men, which they argue would lead to sexual violence against women. So we can descend on nude clubs today, tomorrow it will be music videos that show half-naked women, and next will be night clubs etc. You obviously use the Internet, which has numerous pornography websites and even sites on how to take your own life. Perhaps you can convince us of your ‘moral purity' by deciding henceforth not to use the Internet. Most people will prefer the freedom to be allowed to use the Internet and to make their own moral decision on whether they want to visit websites that host pornography and nude dancing.

6) Your assumption that, as Africans, we are morally superior to other societies is debatable. Yes, we may be more ‘churcheous' and invoke the name of God more than other races, but that does not necessarily translate into moral uprightness. Have you not read that a significant population of female undergraduates in Nigeria are prostitutes? Have you not heard of cultism in universities, of insecurity of life and property, of wanton bribery, kidnapping, ritual murders, the hawking of human parts? Did nude clubs cause these? Has the moral decay not gone as low as it can go even without nightclubs?

7) Moral grandstanding is not the same as righteousness. By your admission you have visited the nude clubs. What did you go there to do, Sir? Kindly read this piece on ‘The Hypocrite in All of Us?"
http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/articles/jideofor-adibe/the-hypocrite-in-all-of-us.html
Can you swear you have never done other things morally more reprehensible than visiting a nightclub?

8) Contrary to your opinion, the article (if you read it) does not advocate for nightclubs. It merely presents the various sides to the argument, and posits that it is wrong to take a decision in a secular and plural society on the say-so of the religious right (which represents only one version of morality). It is instructive that many websites now allow people opportunities to comment on articles they publish. It is one way of allowing ideas to compete in the marketplace of ideas. You exercised such right, but will not want to hear of opposing views – even when it is obvious you are not the most informed on the subject. Were you to be a publisher, perhaps only opinions that are in line with yours will be published. Was this not essentially what the military dictators did in the Nigeria?
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Denker posted on 01-15-2010, 07:44:14 AM
QUOTE:
Contrary to your opinion, the article (if you read it) does not advocate for nightclubs.


..btw, wats wrong about nightclubs...as long as everyding exist within ambit of rules, laws and regulations..abi we all no dey for west dey enjoy the sane societies with all the alleged decadence/s? -abeg make una carri go...au revoir!
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Southernnortherner posted on 01-15-2010, 08:01:20 AM
@ Bode Your criticisms were too harsh, and you stooped so low to insult the writer in person. That is barbaric. I believe you still have much to learn from the UK, cos your height of intolerance is definitely unacceptable, especiallyfor a supposed intellectual ( which you call yourself ). His reply is adequate, and I bet you can see a lot of maturity from his response. I rest my case.
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Pcjadibe posted on 01-15-2010, 08:35:14 AM
Apologies. I meant to say it was not advocating for nude clubs, which the author has accused me of. The article took no position because in relatively homogenous cities, it could make sense. The European Union jursiprdunce takes such a position on moral issues - they leave toi countries to decide, and even within countires, municipal authorities also have a say through by-laws. I believe it is wrong to impose a clampdown, in a plural society, because one section that represents a version of morality says so.
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Do-do-me posted on 01-15-2010, 08:44:08 AM
Bode Eluyera, I totally disagree with your agrument. As a woman, I feel women should not subject their bodies to such low moral values. But for the survival instincts in a country where the government are more concerned about their pockets, people have decided to survive this way and I do not object to it. Is theire somewhere in the by-laws that says this is wrong then I am okay with the govt closing their stores or if as a business the organization does not pay taxes.

You talk about the japanese and asians, i am sure its in their by-laws not to pratice these acts. However on my last visit to the Netherland - red district, i saw more asian than any other nationality.

I noticed that you also visited the clubs, so why did you visit them. For an economy to grow, there must be buying and selling of services and not everyone can work in an office. Even in Nigeria, there are no jobs for people who really want it.

I would rather encourage that as we imbibe western values, we also imbibe their legal systems where everyone is subject to legal system. You shouldnt be able to close someone's shop just like that. There should be a system for monitoring these types of services and granting licenses - maybe make the licensing fees very high to curb such services.

I have visited Nigeria and I no longer see much of the african culture in the big cities. We should not deceive ourselves that certain things are not acceptible. We should accept the good and the bad with westernization.

Note I have not visited any of such clubs but I am always glad when people are paid for whatever services they perform. They should also be dully taxed. Shekena!!!
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Kelechi posted on 01-15-2010, 13:38:25 PM
Nudity is not uncommon to Africans. It was actually western civilization that eradicated nudity through the provision of clothes, etc. Even then, nudity was never commodified when Africans were supposed to know no better. As such, I will personally find it difficult to buy the argument that it is justifiable to condone the patronage of nudity as a form of art but I do agree that the Lagos State government should have taken the case to the court of public opinion. My argument is that we are a secular society and should not be seen to dance to the tunes of religious bodies. Would the same government cede if the same demand or a more ridiculous one was made on it by an Islamic body?

In Dublin - Ireland, public outcry was all it took for Peter Stringfellow to close his lap-dancing club (Stringfellows) in 2006. He promised to set up another one soon after but 4 years later, he knows better than to try.

In democracy the peoples opinion MUST count for something.
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Bode Eluyera posted on 01-15-2010, 22:37:03 PM
QUOTE:
Thanks Bode for your emotionally-laden comments. My name is Jideofor Adibe. I am the author of the article.

1) People who believe in one line of argument and who do not want to even entertain an opposing line of view are described as ‘fanatics', and I am sure you are not one - despite the emotional flourishes in your write-up. Kindly google Ngozi Chimamanda Adichie's, ‘The Danger of a Single Story'


1. I don't need to google Ngozi Chimamanda Adichie's, ‘The Danger of a Single Story' because it was aired on NVS and I even left a post. She spoke about European misconception/stereotype about Africa and not about nude dancing and/or prostitution. She spoke about Africa's rich culture and literature;


2) I am happy to note that you also live in Europe. A hallmark of any society regarded as ‘stable' is tolerance – including for groups that some will regard as offensive such as racist groups like the British National Party,strip clubs, etc. These groups are allowed to legally exist because it is feared that to suppress them will drive their ideas underground, which will make them more dangerous. More importantly, it is believed that to suppress them will abridge their free speech rights, which is regarded as the foundation of democracy. In many democracies such as US and UK, because of the importance of free speech as the foundation of democracy, ideas, including those we find obscene or obnoxious, can only be suppressed if they are proven to pose ‘real and immediate danger' to the society.


2. I have already told you in my earlier post that free speech or democracy should not be confused with promoting prostitution- which is what you are indirectly doing. I am not against night clubs. What I am against is nude dancing. Apart from the fact that nude dancing promotes prostitution it is IMMORAL. I don't think that democracy or freedom of speech should be an avenue to debase the society. If we are to go by your analysis or free expression concept, then any crime committed - including selling of drugs, 419, armed robbery - too is justified.

3) It is wrong to argue that Africa is so different that practices, such as tolerance, that have helped other countries to co-exist despite the differences in their own society cannot work in ours. For years, we used this alleged uniqueness of Africa to dismiss ideas like freedom, good governance or democracy or to rationalise practices that benefit a few. Intolerance is at the root of religious insurrections, terrorism, and ethnic strifes.

3. I am 100% Yoruba and well versed in Yoruba culture and tradition. I can tell you with confidence that the Yoruba culture in general is self sufficient and richer that the European culture. Talking about culture, I consider Europeans to be animals/barbaric. I don't think that we should emulate Europeans in everything. Good governance is about competence, accountability and MORAL UPRIGHTNESS of those that govern us. The society has the right to get adequate and timely information on their activities. Nude dancing is more of a moral issue. It has nothing in common with religious riots. You are mixing up things here.

4) I am happy to read that you also live in the UK (I guess both of us are in self-imposed exile for reasons best known to us). In the UK and US fanatics are regarded as a greater threat to society than any idea they try to defend because they have no qualms inflicting damages on people who espouse ideas they don't like or even taking life to defend a spurious idea. It is for this reason that they are often placed on the watch list in both countries. You have just mentioned that if you have your way, you will have me flogged in public. There are also many people in the UK, who, if they have their way, will have us deported or even killed – just because we look different. Another name for this is bigotry. If you publish the sort of vituperations you wrote here in any British medium, you will be placed on a watch list, and most likely will be visited by the police for ‘uttering a threat in writing'


4. I said that I would flog you in the public for propagating prostitution and nudity if I have my way - in order to teach you some moral lessons, and I still stand by this. I did not say that I will kill. Punishment is part of correction in Yoruba culture. Honestly, I think you have been brainwashed by the British to polute our culture and society. I still hold the opinion that you are an educated illiterate. BTW, can you read, write and speak fluently in any Nigerian language?


5) The price of liberty is eternal freedom. There are societies that do not even allow love songs because of fears that it will give certain urges to men, which they argue would lead to sexual violence against women. So we can descend on nude clubs today, tomorrow it will be music videos that show half-naked women, and next will be night clubs etc. You obviously use the Internet, which has numerous pornography websites and even sites on how to take your own life. Perhaps you can convince us of your ‘moral purity' by deciding henceforth not to use the Internet. Most people will prefer the freedom to be allowed to use the Internet and to make their own moral decision on whether they want to visit websites that host pornography and nude dancing.

5. If we allow proponents of nude clubs like you to have your way, tomorrow you will start a new campaign in support of HOMOSEXUALS, LESBIANS, SAME SEX MARRIAGES, SEX TRANSPLANTS E.T.C. Unlike free or/and uncontrolled access to the internet which has become a hot debate in the society especially among parents recently, nude dancing and prostitution are within the control of the society.


6) Your assumption that, as Africans, we are morally superior to other societies is debatable. Yes, we may be more ‘churcheous' and invoke the name of God more than other races, but that does not necessarily translate into moral uprightness. Have you not read that a significant population of female undergraduates in Nigeria are prostitutes? Have you not heard of cultism in universities, of insecurity of life and property, of wanton bribery, kidnapping, ritual murders, the hawking of human parts? Did nude clubs cause these? Has the moral decay not gone as low as it can go even without nightclubs?

6. To be honest, I don't know everything about African culture, but I know a lot about Yoruba culture. And as I have said earlier, our culture is much richer than the Europeans'. Europeans have no culture. They are barbaric. I am speaking from my own personal experience. I studied, lived with them and befriended them. Most of the amoral conducts in our society today are due to the negative influence of Europeans: films and through their agents like you who promote their amoral values and tell us that there is nothing wrong in nude dancing, prostitution, smoking, e.t.c. Bribery, kidnapping and other crimes are due mainly to bad governance, mismanagement, poverty, moral decay in the society and the fact that we have been ruled for long by heartless imbeciles who were to power by the Europeans. Allowing nightclubs will even worsen our already bad situations. Don't you think so?

7) Moral grandstanding is not the same as righteousness. By your admission you have visited the nude clubs. What did you go there to do, Sir? Kindly read this piece on ‘The Hypocrite in All of Us?\"
http://www.nigeriavillagesquare.com/articles/jideofor-adibe/the-hypocrite-in-all-of-us.html
Can you swear you have never done other things morally more reprehensible than visiting a nightclub?

7. Sometimes I visit night clubs - but not necessaryly nude clubs. Unfortunately, since I reside in Europe, this is beyond my control. I never drink nor smoke. Ever since I was born, I have never even smoked a single stick of cigarette nor drunk a glass of beer. In addition, as I have earlier said, 'One thing is to watch European girls dancing nakedly, it is completely a different thing if I am in support of setting up nude clubs in Nigeria. The fact that I go to night/nude clubs does not necessaryly mean that I am in support of replicating them in Nigeria. I interact with people that smoke and drink, but that does not mean that I am in support. I never allow my visitors to smoke in my house because of PASSIVE SMOKING, but I give them beer or whatever they want to drink

8) Contrary to your opinion, the article (if you read it) does not advocate for nightclubs. It merely presents the various sides to the argument, and posits that it is wrong to take a decision in a secular and plural society on the say-so of the religious right (which represents only one version of morality). It is instructive that many websites now allow people opportunities to comment on articles they publish. It is one way of allowing ideas to compete in the marketplace of ideas. You exercised such right, but will not want to hear of opposing views – even when it is obvious you are not the most informed on the subject. Were you to be a publisher, perhaps only opinions that are in line with yours will be published. Was this not essentially what the military dictators did in the Nigeria?
]


.[COLOR="blue"]

8. I disagree with you too on this. I appreciate your reply. I took my time to go through it carefully and reread your article. Your arguments as far as I am concerned do not hold water: There are lots of contradictions and attempt to manipulate facts in your reply. I can read between the lines. Perhaps, you did not directly advocate for setting up nightclubs, but on my objective analysis of your write-up, that is what you are insinuating. You are indirectly in support, but not bold enough to come out boldly. The purose of your article was to gauge the reaction of the villagers to your position. I am 100% sure that it were within your power, you would play an active part in setting up n ightclubs in Nigeria. Nude clubs is not part of Yoruba's culture.

Every publisher has its own policies, preferences, strategies and priorities which go a long way in determining what books/authors get published.

As you can see/testify, none of your 8 arguments are convincing. They are all flawed. You can not manipulate me. You can only manipulate those who lack the ability to think clearly and ask the right questions.[/COLOR
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Manoj posted on 08-13-2010, 02:04:17 AM
hi
Re: Governor Fashola And The Nude Dancers
Aphrodite posted on 08-13-2010, 11:06:03 AM
Bode, I have so many things I would have loved to say to you...I don't know where to start so I will just touch on one issue and leave the rest for another day.

You go to strip clubs in "the abroad"but don't want it in Nigeria to taint your pure African sisters and daughters. I tell you what you remind me of right away, the great hypocrite of a married man who has a girlfriend that gives him a bj but would never have his wife perform the "evil, dirty" act on him so as not to taint the same mouth she kisses his children "goodnight" with.

And oh, by the way, I think you are a fanatic and you are pathetic.

When you come to Naija, please contact me, I need to hook you up to some strippers to f%@k your brains out make you for calm down. Your body too hot.
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