IBB, Abiola and the America connection

These questions were never meant to be asked, at least not by me. Over the years beclouded by the phrase "let bygone be bygone", Nigerians were subdue to make public these damning questions regarding the suspicious manner Bashorun MKO Abiola died. Perhaps after a long tragic battle for the actualisation of populist governance, those who should have asked these questions saw the need not to give the military further reasons to hold on to power. It was plainly a situation where silent is golden. Understanding the necessity of this silent in our national interest, Abiola's family seem to have faithfully accepted their fate; so do his diehard supporters. These questions too were buried in my heart; but with the emergence of IBB in our political space, is will be fatal not to ask them and demand for answers.

The annulment of the freest election ever in Nigeria by the then Military dictator, Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida has refused to die even with the passage of time. Babangida with all his flattery charms and sycophantic lieutenants have not been able to kill the infamy of that sadistic decision on the people of this country till date. Everywhere he go and whatever he seeks for, seems to remind him of his June 12, 1993 notoriety. Even his boldface apologies, only open more atrocious revelations of his personality and why Nigerians should not allow him go to his grave in peace.

The story goes thus; When the blood thirsty dictator, General Sani Abacha died, General Abdulsalam, the long standing friend of IBB succeeded him. Against military seniority, the then Lt. General Jerry Useni was edged out of the succession scheme, despite the fact that he was the most senior military officer after Abacha. In a matter of days, it became obvious that Abdulsalam's government was an extension of IBB's reign. Our saving grace was that Abdulsalam is a docile leader, who is afraid to push his luck too far. General Abdulsalam was in a hurry to leave power, but needed an anointed successor; someone the ÔÇśestablishment' will trust to cover their evil deeds and compensate the yorubas at least for a short period of time.

Chief Olusegun Obasanjo came into their picture. They remembered he was once used to subvert the wishes of the people, and he did so well then. He was their main man; he is the sadist spoiler and avowed enemy of the poor. In prison, they went for him; he was released and immediately granted presidential pardon. OBJ was flown in a presidential jet back to his farm in Otta and within forty eight hours, IBB visited him.

Meanwhile, Chief Abiola the political detainee, who was not convicted yet of any crime, was still kept in detention. Few days later, he died in a very suspicious manner. Abiola's police attach├ę admitted before the Oputa commission investigating human right abuses that he was called to Aso Rock villa to see the then Chief of General Staff, Admiral Mike Akhigbe. And that minutes after he left for the villa, Abiola was given a cup of tea which culminated his life. This attach├ę told the panel that he always taste whatever Abiola was offered first before the business mogul devour the remaining content, but on the day, Abiola died he was not there to taste the tea because he was far away in Aso rock villa for a meeting that never took place.

This tale open so many prying questions seeking answers. And the more one put the brain to task, the more it obvious the man was killed. Then the next set of questions are: Who are his killers? Why did they want him dead? What is America connection in all of this? And finally what did IBB told Obasanjo, and what were OBJ responses, when IBB visited him immediately he was released from prison? Remember Abiola was still alive then.

You don't need to be a detective to draw this logical deduction; if Abiola is alive, OBJ can never be the successor to General Abdulsalam. And don't forget the interest of this destructive military cabal of that time, must be actualised. Do I need to say more?

After Babangida's annulment of June 12, 1993 presidential election, a Abiola fight back presidency would have been IBB's waterloo. Abiola would have drown IBB in the world of business and power; to see him live, would have been IBB's eternal nightmare.

Also Chief Abiola wanted reparation paid to Africa for centuries of slavery against its people. Americans were vehemently opposed to it. Abiola's presidency would have led other African leaders in spearheading this demand to logical end. That's why I'm at a lost over the fact that he died in the midst of visiting American delegates.

A little over twelve years ago, Chief Moshood Abiola was forcefully evicted from this world by evil men and enemies of the common man. Killing the ÔÇśhopes 1993' that bind the masses of Nigeria together. Equally painful is the realisation that benefitting ÔÇśdemocratic' governments have not given him, his long overdue befitting monuments.

Instead of confining himself to a solitude of silence and regrets, which should have been his everlasting reward for the injuries he brought to the psyche of our people. The principal destructive character that annulled our peoples' hope in 1993, wants to come back and lord it over us again.

Questions raised over Bashorun Abiola's unconvincing natural death need answers. It will be our mortal fatality as a people if those who one way or the other aided it are allowed to return to power. Abiola must not die in vain, that is why the onus lies on us to tell IBB and his cohorts this simple sentence by our collective votes: "Another IBB's presidency, never again."

By Olurotimi Adeola

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