What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria

More than ever before, Nigerian discourses are rapidly migrating to what one might call the virtual public sphere. Spirited and occasionally transformative discourses about Nigerian politics, economics, and culture are now increasingly taking place on such Web sites as Facebook, Sahara Reporters, the Nigerian Village Square, and a whole host of other digital discursive arenas. It came as no surprise to me when I read sometime ago that almost 40 percent of Internet traffic from Africa's over 50 countries now originates in Nigeria.

We have outrivaled South Africa and the North African nations of Egypt and Tunisia in Internet use. Until this year, these countries had dominated the African presence on the Web. This is a good sign. Discursive democracy, which has been sorely lacking in our political culture, is taking roots. This is especially helped by the impersonality and anonymity of the Internet, which conduce to the bracketing of social status differentials, so that people at the lower end of the social scale can converse on equal terms with people at the upper end of the scale.

This all bodes well for deliberative democracy, except that the nature, tenor, and compass of most of the discussions that take place in digital Nigeria give cause for a little worry. Go to the comments page of a typical article in, say Sahara Reporters or the Nigerian Village Square, on any issue. You will be petrified by the unnervingly savage profusion of unspeakably raw, undiluted ethnic and religious chauvinism that pass for comments. The display of baleful and willful ignorance is often so thick you can cut it with a knife.

If readers don't agree with a writer's point of view - or, in fact, if they merely don't like his/her name! - they almost always ignore the substance of his argument and launch vicious attacks on his ethnicity, religion, and region. And, of course, they never forget to add that he or she is a paid hack of some politician. In the twisted opinion of much of the contemporary Nigerian Internet commentariat, no opinion is the product of any individual's independent analytical or discursive choice; it's always already inspired either by primordial loyalties or by pecuniary gratification - or both! The only "objective" and "balanced" opinions are those that reinforce and give comfort to the commenters' prejudices and biases. Although there are the occasional sane, measured, and thoughtful comments on articles and news stories, they are often, for the most part, drowned out by the primitive cacophony of rank ignorance and bigotry that now pass for "comments" on Nigerian-based Web sites.

Every issue is gazed at from the crude prism of Nigeria's primordial fault-lines, which have unfortunately been actively promoted and even sanctified by our backward ruling elites since Nigeria's founding. Calls for the dissolution of the country or for the excision of certain parts of the country from the union, or the belittling of whole peoples and cultures almost always accompany ANY Nigerian online discussion. In short, the quality of discourse is often so terrifyingly crude, so rhetorically violent, so destitute in basic conversational decorum you would think you are in some godforsaken cyber-jungle where wild, blood-thirsty animals are tearing each other apart with maniacal glee.

A friend once mentioned to me that if the comments people make on popular Nigerian cyber forums is a genuine reflection of what we think about the fascinating ethnic and religious tapestry that is Nigeria, then we have no business remaining as one country. While I understand the sentiment behind this point of view, I think it misses three crucial points.

First, there is something about anonymity that just brings out the beasts in people. People write mean-spirited and unmentionable things about other people that they can't say about them or to them if they were to meet physically. Anonymity frees people from the burden of responsibility, accountability, and restraint. This fact, to be fair, is true of most anonymous online discourses; it isn't exclusive to Nigeria, although a certain class of Nigerians would seem to be patenting hate and irresponsibility in online comments.

Second, for most of our life as a nation, we have been under totalitarian military governments whose hallmark had been the cruel, iron-clad strangulation of dissent and honest national conversation. The brief periods of civilian administrations we've had have not been qualitatively different. Plus, our national media formation is, for the most part, corrupt, compromised, closed, and obsessed with the petty squabbles of the ruling elite. So people have not had avenues to vent the pent-up anger, angst, and anxieties that have built up in their systems over the years. The Internet is now providing the platform for them to ventilate their suppressed frustrations. Perhaps, after a while, the undisguised rawness and vulgarity that characterize online comments on popular Nigerian online discussion forums will wane and rational, reasoned conversations and logical disputations would take place. I hope I am right.

Third, it appears that the poor and lowly taste of the comments in these forums is a reflection of the low quality of mind and immaturity of the people who participate in them. If mastery of basic grammar can be a reliable measure of educational attainment ( I know it not always is), then most of the commenters really sound barely educated. They come across as angry, ignorant, ill-mannered little terrors. It appears that mature, well-educated Nigerians have withdrawn from participating in these forums and just watch in amusement from the sidelines. I can bear testimony that when I started to actively participate in Nigerian online conversations in the early times, the quality of discourse was far superior to what obtains now. The incredible ignorance and viciousness that now pass for discussion on Nigerian online discussion boards is truly staggering.

I've stopped participating in popular online Nigerian conversations in the last one year. I have even stopped reading comments on my articles, which is sad because there are the occasional insightful comments, contestations, additions, suggestions, etc from a few thoughtful readers. But I can't subject myself to the torment of reading scorn-worthy, malicious illiteracy that I have chosen not to respond to because I want to read the occasional intelligent comment. That's why I include my email address in every of my posts. If people have something important to say, they will probably send it to my email. And since the email will hopefully bear the real names of the senders, they are likely to be more civil and more measured than they would be under the cloak of anonymity that the message boards give them.

After all is said and done, I don't advocate that anybody be banned or censured for the egregiousness of their comments. I think the key is to introduce some mechanism for people to be accountable for the comments that they make - such as registering their IP addresses and making them trackable. But if "virtual" Nigeria is a true reflection of the "real" Nigeria, then ours is a country where frighteningly naked hate and mutual suspicion and distrust reign supreme. Wise leaders would take a cue from this.

Author can be reached at farooqkperogi@gmail.com. He blogs at www.farooqkperogi.blogspot.com



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Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Ozuo posted on 10-30-2010, 16:51:47 PM
"that's why GEJ's presidency is going to end in a disaster!!! the man is a eunuch, politically and biologically (ever wondered why his wife can't have babies?) lol" ----Iln too

The provenance of a man/woman that made the above comment today on NVS?
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Reality check posted on 10-30-2010, 16:51:47 PM
QUOTE:
I think the key is to introduce some mechanism for people to be accountable for the comments that they make - such as registering their IP addresses and making them trackable. But if \"virtual\" Nigeria is a true reflection of the \"real\" Nigeria, then ours is a country where frighteningly naked hate and mutual suspicion and distrust reign supreme. Wise leaders would take a cue from this.


"If"???

Welcome from your slumbering journey.
Welcome to WAZOBIA land of closet ethnic and religious bigotry. Now, go back to sleep again.

Sir, your main problem here like most Nigerians engage in is being in denial, not to mention self-deceit.

Poor you. You seem to be in a trance. You cannot even separate appearance and reality when it comes to Nigerian matters. What makes you think that "virtual" reality on the cyber airways is different from that of the 'real' Nigeria?

Any international forum is a just reflection of the society it represents.

What leaders are you talking about? The leaders of the society just like the owners of any online forum are not different. The internet is a reflection of whom we are. If the head of the fish is rotten.......God bless Atiku for that statement. The leaders are worse than the followers, for they set the tone of how things should be in or out of the cyber airways.

Check out other international forum with the same concepts or even simple blog sites that are well moderated. Due to the fact that the individuals come from civilized countries, the level of civility is often reflected in their discourses.

So, what do you expect from Nigerians and their messageboards. If you cannot hold your leaders and forum moderators to the same standards, why would you expect to do that for ordinary posters. Especially when the leaders are worse off than the ordinary citizens?

Registering ISP addresses for accountability and so on have been in effect for the longest time. But where you have inequitable use of such a corrective measure, it defeats the purpose when you always have sacred cows just because "they" finance the campaign and agenda of the so-called leaders and forum owners. You can't bite the 'arse' that feeds you right. lol

It is called the "Ribadu" syndrome of selective justice. Or the animal farm syndrome of "all animals are equal, but some are all equal than others".

Please, call a spade a spade and stop dreaming. Who is afraid of internet warriors anyway? For cowards die many times before their deaths. If you can't take the heat, gerrrrout of the gaddem kitchen.

Reuben Abati and Phillip Emeagwali remain my internet heros. Sticks and stones may break their backs but not words. Hoooray!
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Carrygo posted on 10-30-2010, 16:51:47 PM

More than ever before, Nigerian discourses are rapidly migrating to what one might call the virtual public sphere. Spirited and occasionally transformative discourses about Nigerian politics, economics, and culture are now increasingly taking place on such Web sites as Facebook, Sahara Reporters, the Nigerian Village Square, and a whole host of other digital discursive arenas. It came as no surprise to me when I read sometime ago that almost 40 percent of Internet traffic from Africa's over 50 countries now originates in Nigeria.

We have outrivaled South Africa and the North African nations of Egypt and Tunisia in Internet use. Until this year, these countries had dominated the African presence on the Web. This is a good sign. Discursive democracy, which has been sorely lacking in our political culture, is taking roots. This is especially helped by the impersonality and anonymity of the Internet, which conduce to the bracketing of social status differentials, so that people at the lower end of the social scale can converse on equal terms with people at the upper end of the scale.

This all bodes well for deliberative democracy, except that the nature, tenor, and compass of most of the discussions that take place in digital Nigeria give cause for a little worry. Go to the comments page of a typical article in, say Sahara Reporters or the Nigerian Village Square, on any issue. You will be petrified by the unnervingly savage profusion of unspeakably raw, undiluted ethnic and religious chauvinism that pass for comments. The display of baleful and willful ignorance is often so thick you can cut it with a knife.

If readers don't agree with a writer's point of view - or, in fact, if they merely don't like his/her name! - they almost always ignore the substance of his argument and launch vicious attacks on his ethnicity, religion, and region. And, of course, they never forget to add that he or she is a paid hack of some politician. In the twisted opinion of much of the contemporary Nigerian Internet commentariat, no opinion is the product of any individual's independent analytical or discursive choice; it's always already inspired either by primordial loyalties or by pecuniary gratification - or both! The only "objective" and "balanced" opinions are those that reinforce and give comfort to the commenters' prejudices and biases. Although there are the occasional sane, measured, and thoughtful comments on articles and news stories, they are often, for the most part, drowned out by the primitive cacophony of rank ignorance and bigotry that now pass for "comments" on Nigerian-based Web sites.

Every issue is gazed at from the crude prism of Nigeria's primordial fault-lines, which have unfortunately been actively promoted and even sanctified by our backward ruling elites since Nigeria's founding. Calls for the dissolution of the country or for the excision of certain parts of the country from the union, or the belittling of whole peoples and cultures almost always accompany ANY Nigerian online discussion. In short, the quality of discourse is often so terrifyingly crude, so rhetorically violent, so destitute in basic conversational decorum you would think you are in some godforsaken cyber-jungle where wild, blood-thirsty animals are tearing each other apart with maniacal glee.

A friend once mentioned to me that if the comments people make on popular Nigerian cyber forums is a genuine reflection of what we think about the fascinating ethnic and religious tapestry that is Nigeria, then we have no business remaining as one country. While I understand the sentiment behind this point of view, I think it misses three crucial points.

First, there is something about anonymity that just brings out the beasts in people. People write mean-spirited and unmentionable things about other people that they can't say about them or to them if they were to meet physically. Anonymity frees people from the burden of responsibility, accountability, and restraint. This fact, to be fair, is true of most anonymous online discourses; it isn't exclusive to Nigeria, although a certain class of Nigerians would seem to be patenting hate and irresponsibility in online comments.

Second, for most of our life as a nation, we have been under totalitarian military governments whose hallmark had been the cruel, iron-clad strangulation of dissent and honest national conversation. The brief periods of civilian administrations we've had have not been qualitatively different. Plus, our national media formation is, for the most part, corrupt, compromised, closed, and obsessed with the petty squabbles of the ruling elite. So people have not had avenues to vent the pent-up anger, angst, and anxieties that have built up in their systems over the years. The Internet is now providing the platform for them to ventilate their suppressed frustrations. Perhaps, after a while, the undisguised rawness and vulgarity that characterize online comments on popular Nigerian online discussion forums will wane and rational, reasoned conversations and logical disputations would take place. I hope I am right.

Third, it appears that the poor and lowly taste of the comments in these forums is a reflection of the low quality of mind and immaturity of the people who participate in them. If mastery of basic grammar can be a reliable measure of educational attainment ( I know it not always is), then most of the commenters really sound barely educated. They come across as angry, ignorant, ill-mannered little terrors. It appears that mature, well-educated Nigerians have withdrawn from participating in these forums and just watch in amusement from the sidelines. I can bear testimony that when I started to actively participate in Nigerian online conversations in the early times, the quality of discourse was far superior to what obtains now. The incredible ignorance and viciousness that now pass for discussion on Nigerian online discussion boards is truly staggering.

I've stopped participating in popular online Nigerian conversations in the last one year. I have even stopped reading comments on my articles, which is sad because there are the occasional insightful comments, contestations, additions, suggestions, etc from a few thoughtful readers. But I can't subject myself to the torment of reading scorn-worthy, malicious illiteracy that I have chosen not to respond to because I want to read the occasional intelligent comment. That's why I include my email address in every of my posts. If people have something important to say, they will probably send it to my email. And since the email will hopefully bear the real names of the senders, they are likely to be more civil and more measured than they would be under the cloak of anonymity that the message boards give them.

After all is said and done, I don't advocate that anybody be banned or censured for the egregiousness of their comments. I think the key is to introduce some mechanism for people to be accountable for the comments that they make - such as registering their IP addresses and making them trackable. But if "virtual" Nigeria is a true reflection of the "real" Nigeria, then ours is a country where frighteningly naked hate and mutual suspicion and distrust reign supreme. Wise leaders would take a cue from this.

Author can be reached at farooqkperogi@gmail.com. He blogs at www.farooqkperogi.blogspot.com



..Read the full article
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Tanibaba posted on 10-30-2010, 16:51:47 PM

More than ever before, Nigerian discourses are rapidly migrating to what one might call the virtual public sphere. Spirited and occasionally transformative discourses about Nigerian politics, economics, and culture are now increasingly taking place on such Web sites as Facebook, Sahara Reporters, the Nigerian Village Square, and a whole host of other digital discursive arenas. It came as no surprise to me when I read sometime ago that almost 40 percent of Internet traffic from Africa's over 50 countries now originates in Nigeria.

We have outrivaled South Africa and the North African nations of Egypt and Tunisia in Internet use. Until this year, these countries had dominated the African presence on the Web. This is a good sign. Discursive democracy, which has been sorely lacking in our political culture, is taking roots. This is especially helped by the impersonality and anonymity of the Internet, which conduce to the bracketing of social status differentials, so that people at the lower end of the social scale can converse on equal terms with people at the upper end of the scale.

This all bodes well for deliberative democracy, except that the nature, tenor, and compass of most of the discussions that take place in digital Nigeria give cause for a little worry. Go to the comments page of a typical article in, say Sahara Reporters or the Nigerian Village Square, on any issue. You will be petrified by the unnervingly savage profusion of unspeakably raw, undiluted ethnic and religious chauvinism that pass for comments. The display of baleful and willful ignorance is often so thick you can cut it with a knife.

If readers don't agree with a writer's point of view - or, in fact, if they merely don't like his/her name! - they almost always ignore the substance of his argument and launch vicious attacks on his ethnicity, religion, and region. And, of course, they never forget to add that he or she is a paid hack of some politician. In the twisted opinion of much of the contemporary Nigerian Internet commentariat, no opinion is the product of any individual's independent analytical or discursive choice; it's always already inspired either by primordial loyalties or by pecuniary gratification - or both! The only "objective" and "balanced" opinions are those that reinforce and give comfort to the commenters' prejudices and biases. Although there are the occasional sane, measured, and thoughtful comments on articles and news stories, they are often, for the most part, drowned out by the primitive cacophony of rank ignorance and bigotry that now pass for "comments" on Nigerian-based Web sites.

Every issue is gazed at from the crude prism of Nigeria's primordial fault-lines, which have unfortunately been actively promoted and even sanctified by our backward ruling elites since Nigeria's founding. Calls for the dissolution of the country or for the excision of certain parts of the country from the union, or the belittling of whole peoples and cultures almost always accompany ANY Nigerian online discussion. In short, the quality of discourse is often so terrifyingly crude, so rhetorically violent, so destitute in basic conversational decorum you would think you are in some godforsaken cyber-jungle where wild, blood-thirsty animals are tearing each other apart with maniacal glee.

A friend once mentioned to me that if the comments people make on popular Nigerian cyber forums is a genuine reflection of what we think about the fascinating ethnic and religious tapestry that is Nigeria, then we have no business remaining as one country. While I understand the sentiment behind this point of view, I think it misses three crucial points.

First, there is something about anonymity that just brings out the beasts in people. People write mean-spirited and unmentionable things about other people that they can't say about them or to them if they were to meet physically. Anonymity frees people from the burden of responsibility, accountability, and restraint. This fact, to be fair, is true of most anonymous online discourses; it isn't exclusive to Nigeria, although a certain class of Nigerians would seem to be patenting hate and irresponsibility in online comments.

Second, for most of our life as a nation, we have been under totalitarian military governments whose hallmark had been the cruel, iron-clad strangulation of dissent and honest national conversation. The brief periods of civilian administrations we've had have not been qualitatively different. Plus, our national media formation is, for the most part, corrupt, compromised, closed, and obsessed with the petty squabbles of the ruling elite. So people have not had avenues to vent the pent-up anger, angst, and anxieties that have built up in their systems over the years. The Internet is now providing the platform for them to ventilate their suppressed frustrations. Perhaps, after a while, the undisguised rawness and vulgarity that characterize online comments on popular Nigerian online discussion forums will wane and rational, reasoned conversations and logical disputations would take place. I hope I am right.

Third, it appears that the poor and lowly taste of the comments in these forums is a reflection of the low quality of mind and immaturity of the people who participate in them. If mastery of basic grammar can be a reliable measure of educational attainment ( I know it not always is), then most of the commenters really sound barely educated. They come across as angry, ignorant, ill-mannered little terrors. It appears that mature, well-educated Nigerians have withdrawn from participating in these forums and just watch in amusement from the sidelines. I can bear testimony that when I started to actively participate in Nigerian online conversations in the early times, the quality of discourse was far superior to what obtains now. The incredible ignorance and viciousness that now pass for discussion on Nigerian online discussion boards is truly staggering.

I've stopped participating in popular online Nigerian conversations in the last one year. I have even stopped reading comments on my articles, which is sad because there are the occasional insightful comments, contestations, additions, suggestions, etc from a few thoughtful readers. But I can't subject myself to the torment of reading scorn-worthy, malicious illiteracy that I have chosen not to respond to because I want to read the occasional intelligent comment. That's why I include my email address in every of my posts. If people have something important to say, they will probably send it to my email. And since the email will hopefully bear the real names of the senders, they are likely to be more civil and more measured than they would be under the cloak of anonymity that the message boards give them.

After all is said and done, I don't advocate that anybody be banned or censured for the egregiousness of their comments. I think the key is to introduce some mechanism for people to be accountable for the comments that they make - such as registering their IP addresses and making them trackable. But if "virtual" Nigeria is a true reflection of the "real" Nigeria, then ours is a country where frighteningly naked hate and mutual suspicion and distrust reign supreme. Wise leaders would take a cue from this.

Author can be reached at farooqkperogi@gmail.com. He blogs at www.farooqkperogi.blogspot.com



..Read the full article
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Emj posted on 10-30-2010, 16:53:56 PM
I
QUOTE:
've stopped participating in popular online Nigerian conversations in the last one year. I have even stopped reading comments on my articles, which is sad because there are the occasional insightful comments, contestations, additions, suggestions, etc from a few thoughtful readers. But I can't subject myself to the torment of reading scorn-worthy, malicious illiteracy that I have chosen not to respond to because I want to read the occasional intelligent comment. That's why I include my email address in every of my posts. If people have something important to say, they will probably send it to my email. And since the email will hopefully bear the real names of the senders, they are likely to be more civil and more measured than they would be under the cloak of anonymity that the message boards give them.


Sorry buddy, not likely to send u an email...and eherm, u yab no be small
Why not make us go for a mental and fitness test to certify us fit to comment on articles.
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Ozoodoo posted on 10-30-2010, 17:11:52 PM
Kperogi
You have a bloated sense of self-importance. You are just being delusional.
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Bode_Boluz posted on 10-30-2010, 20:11:43 PM
Farooq A. Kperogi... You have summed it up nicely.

Wow! I couldn't have expresed it any better!!!

It is a sad state of affairs.

Thanks for giving voice and clarity to the opinion and observation some of us hold, about the chaotic state of Nigerian Internet Etiquette and Conduct.

Nice one.
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Dr Damages posted on 10-30-2010, 21:11:25 PM
You are a very stupidi man. You hear me so?

And since you're not going to read my comment anyway, I can say it again. You're a very stupidiiest man.

Who do you think you are? Who gave you power to decide who go school and who no go school? Nonesense!

Na because your papa steal money and come send you to better school, you wan riddiculus us wey go community secondari skool. Mind yourself! wetin?

In fact, you are stupidi thrice time.

Who be de people who dey kill other Nigerians under the cover of riot/religious crisis/demostration?

No be the same annonymous people?

You go school, meanwhile, you be arant ignoramus.

You no say i fit copy this put for your email address. But no go do am. You no deserve am. Make your padipadi friends tell you wetin I talk.

As I see you so, you go need someone to interpret am for you.

Cambridge, my asss.

Stop opening your deti mouth for public. We no need your advices. Since you commot for messageboards, wetin happen? We no even know say you commot.

A beg, so sit your nyashi down for potopoto.
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
Tanibaba posted on 10-31-2010, 02:22:00 AM
Farook,

While I agree with you that there is a need to improve the way we address ourselves on this forum, that we need to reduce abusive language and move towards etiquette on the internet I disagree with what you have written here.

When you wrote the article about the death of your wife most of these commentators sympathised with you reflecting the good side of their human nature. However , when you wrote this article Before President Jonathan's Men Murder Another Journalist which was nasty, brutish and indecent most people came down heavily on you. And it will appear that you deserve all the bashings for writing that piece. We have not heard from the hajia since that time.

You see you have to be the change that you want to see in others.

You have to strive very hard not to be a victim of the very song that you sing.

Sometimes I have been attacked on this site but instead of quitting I have adopted some strategies to overcome the disappointments i sometimes experience when I read some comments.
How can you change people when you dont engage them? How can you improve your communication skills if you run away from people that are not seeing things your way.
How can you insult us by telling us that you dont read what we write? Even when people write poor English, if you are patient enough you will understand the message they are trying to pass. Wisdom has no other name even if it is communicated in Swahili

What you require are some skills and to shed the toga of arrogance that you put on whenever you come to the villagesquare.

I was told in our Production Mgt class that one of the ways of discovering new products is through the production of defective ones. In everything there is a lesson to be learnt. Only a coward that is not ready to learn will run away.

taslim
Re: What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria
KaparaK posted on 10-31-2010, 12:08:35 PM
@ Tanibaba, I feel your pain in my comment below designed to kill three (3) birds with one (1) stone, thusly:

In case you missed it, I hope Kperogi saw my response to one of his cousins, Dove, commented on the length that small-brained Sonala Olumhense went on his vituperation aptly called "Obasanjo's Church" just to spite a mere mortal like KaparaK versus 150 million hapless Nigerians. I have repeat, below, the gist for you & your pea-brained colleagues:

Geez! KaparaK must be so important to Sonala and Dove that KaparaK and his hero, OBJ, must be so lashed with lanyard that even Empowered NewsWire wrote its own uncorroborated piece: "Obasanjo Moves Against Jonathan At UN Over UNPFA Top Job" in a desperate attempt to pit former Pres OBJ against the incumbent Pres JONA. OMG! Now, I am blushing!

This self importance has gone to my head that I will be tickled pink if Gerd-rude-ol'man of the mountain and his tontos - IlnToo, Okey Ndibe among other runts, start posting their own fictitious innuendoes as well just to spite KaparaK, his heroes, OBJ, and all the President's Men so much so that within a blink of an eye, we will be reading about Deep Throat, Water Gate at the Potomac of Aso Rock. But Gerd is a wiser man.

KaparaK must be so important to the miserable lives of jeun-jeun Journalists & ghost Writers to corrupt politician, they have to go to the length that little prick, Kperogi has gone in questioning the tone of Nigerian commentators in his lame "What Virtual Nigeria Says About Real Nigeria."

Am I reading these 10/30/10 columns right? They must be a Halloween Eve's Costume Conspiracy. It used to be the Police & Journalist chasing the Thieves & Demonic Politicians, now the table has turned wherein compromised Journalists & ghostly Writers fronting for demonic Politicians-cum-Robbers are now chasing the Police and the Public. That is the Real Nigeria.

Only in Nigeria must it be OK for Nigerian Leaders to steal so brazenly and for Journalist/Writers to report lies, innuendoes, and fictitious doggerels as facts to miss-educate the public in their desperate attempt to cover up the crimes, expecting observant public commentators to be mute, sidon, and keep looking in a trance like Zombies.

They forget the ubiquitous Latin phrase: Vox Populi, Vox Dei. In case you know not what it means, let us spell it for ya - the Voice of the Public is the Voice of God. Better yet, we the Public are gods (tin, may be, to be humble), and you: fictitious writers, jeun-jeun journalists, and lootocrat-politicians are runts. Got it? These bogeymen/women are coming after y'all. Boo-ha-ha!!! The conspiracy is over.

Of course, please keep your doggerels coming and discernible people like us will continue to bust up the upside of your frigging heads with our kondos. You ain't seen nothing yet.
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