Why Team Nigeria Failed at London Olympics

About two weeks ago, we arrived London for the 2012 Olympics with a contingent of 51 sportsmen and women competing in 8 sports namely, athletics, weightlifting, taekwondo, boxing, wrestling, table tennis, canoeing and basketball. We were competing in the last two for the first time ever.

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Even though we did not expect to win the competition, we had arrived hoping to make a decent showing. We even had reasons to believe we could surpass some of our recent achievements at this level of competing. Why not?
We had arrived London riding on the wave of a short but intensive preparation of our athletes in different parts of the world where they did not only have the benefits of high quality facilities and technical support but also had the opportunity to match up against some of the best athletes from other parts of the world, and on some occasions, beating them.
Many commentators agreed that while not ideal, we have had one of our best preparations coming into this competition in recent years. This, coupled with a system that put athletes’ welfare at the heart of planning and an atmosphere devoid of rancor and acrimony, we believed would guarantee us a couple of medals.
However, here we are, only a few days to the end of the competition. Team Nigeria is still not on the medals table. I must say this is as disappointing for my team and myself as it is for all Nigerians everywhere. But even as painful as this disappointment is, we must have the courage to see it for what it is. This, therefore, is a scientific diagnosis of our condition; a clear testimony to how far our sports have fallen behind.
We shall therefore not attempt any excuses or indulge in any unproductive blame game. Rather than see this as a failure, we must see it as an opportunity to rebuild. When other countries have found themselves in this kind of situation in the past, they have used the galvanizing power of disappointment to get down to work. At Atlanta 1996 Olympics, Team Great Britain won only one gold medal. Returning home, the right questions were asked, and the necessary actions were taken. Four years later in Sydney, they returned with 11 gold out of 28 medals. In Beijing four years ago, they returned with 19 gold medals out of 47, placing them in the fourth position. Today, Team GB is sitting pretty in the third position of the medals table surpassing their own expectation. Today, they are able to look back and say they have moved from “zeroes to heroes.” This is our chance. We can also do it. We must see this crisis as the necessary disequilibrium required for serious actions and drastic change. We will not allow this opportunity to pass.
Having being appointed Minister and Chairman, National Sports Commission only two months to the Olympics, I have had to learn very quickly. And I have not received a better lesson than in the last two weeks of the London 2012 Olympics. I have learnt three key lessons from this Olympics:
1. Olympics medal is about hard cash. It is not a coincidence that the medals table appears to reflect the level of economic development of the countries. But having the resources is one thing, making the right strategic investment is another. Team Great Britain largely owes its dramatic success to what is described as “unprecedented financial investment” totaling up to more than 740 million GBP over 15 years. The current annual spending on sports stands at 100 million GBP. However, only 40% of this comes from the treasury, while the remaining 60% is lottery fund.
Conversely, Australia finished fourth in Sydney with 16 gold medals. In London, Australia has fallen outside the top 10 with 6 gold medals. Australians have blamed reduced funding for elite athletes and a lack of facilities at the grassroots levels.
2. Every medal is clearly projected and carefully planned for both in financial and technical terms over a sustained period of time. Only years of intensive, unrelenting training and preparation can win medals. There is no short cut. Medals are won by people who have worked hardest not by those who have prayed hard. We can only win medals by building systems that are capable of producing medalists and champions not by selecting athletes that we hope can win medals.
3. Olympics are a lifetime commitment. The champion is in the child. Ye Shiwen, the 16 year old Chinese girl that shocked the swimming world by setting a new world record in individual medley was only 12 when her country hosted the Olympics. Lizzie Armistead who won the Team GB’s first medal in this Olympics with Silver in cycling got her first bicycle at the age of 4.
The immediate challenge for us is how to translate these lessons into concrete actions in the days ahead. The process of rebuilding will start with the National Sports Festival in Lagos later this year. We shall use this event to flag-off our preparation for the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow and thereafter the 2016 Olympics in Brazil. Some of our top priorities in the days ahead are therefore as follows:
1. Identifying five sports that give us competitive opportunities.
2. Restructuring the Federations of these Sports to make them more democratic, accountable and efficient.
3. Developing a Sports Calendar that will ensure year-round sports activities both within and outside the schools.
4. Strategic engagement with the private sector with the aim to improve funding for sports.
5. Strengthen our coaching and training capabilities by developing strategic partnership with national and international bodies.
I thank all of you here for your support and understanding. We will keep this conversation going, in our belief that you in the media are our major strategic ally in the great task ahead. I want to say thank you to all my athletes and their coaches. They have all tried their best. Even though they have not won medals, many of them got to the quarter finals, the semifinals and finals of their various events and even setting new national, Africa and Commonwealth records in the process. But this is the Olympics, where micro-seconds have made the difference between gold medals and no medals. You are all our heroes and we can only hope to build on your achievements.
I thank the Federal Government and the people of Nigeria everywhere for their wonderful support and understanding during this difficult time. The task ahead has been made grimly clear. Therefore, lets get down to work.
By Bolaji Abdullahi


1
[Sports] Why Team Nigeria Failed at London Olympics
Bolaji Abdullahi, Minister of Sports posted on 08-11-2012, 12:47:18 PM
About two weeks ago, we arrived London for the 2012 Olympics with a contingent of 51 sportsmen and women competing in 8 sports namely, athletics, weightlifting, taekwondo, boxing, wrestling, table tennis, canoeing and basketball. We were competing in the last two for the first time ever.
user posted image

Even though we did not expect to win the competition, we had arrived hoping to make a decent showing. We even had reasons to believe we could surpass some of our recent achievements at this level of competing. Why not?
*
We had arrived London riding on the wave of a short but intensive preparation of our athletes in different parts of the world where they did not only have the benefits of high quality facilities and technical support but also had the opportunity to match up against some of the best athletes from other parts of the world, and on some occasions, beating them.
*
Many commentators agreed that while not ideal, we have had one of our best preparations coming into this competition in recent years. This, coupled with a system that put athletes’ welfare at the heart of planning and an atmosphere devoid of rancor and acrimony, we believed would guarantee us a couple of medals.
*
However, here we are, only a few days to the end of the competition. Team Nigeria is still not on the medals table. I must say this is as disappointing for my team and myself as it is for all Nigerians everywhere. But even as painful as this disappointment is, we must have the courage to see it for what it is. This, therefore, is a scientific diagnosis of our condition; a clear testimony to how far our sports have fallen behind.
*
We shall therefore not attempt any excuses or indulge in any unproductive blame game. Rather than see this as a failure, we must see it as an opportunity to rebuild. When other countries have found themselves in this kind of situation in the past, they have used the galvanizing power of disappointment to get down to work. At Atlanta 1996 Olympics, Team Great Britain won only one gold medal. Returning home, the right questions were asked, and the necessary actions were taken. Four years later in Sydney, they returned with 11 gold out of 28 medals. In Beijing four years ago, they returned with 19 gold medals out of 47, placing them in the fourth position. Today, Team GB is sitting pretty in the third position of the medals table surpassing their own expectation. Today, they are able to look back and say they have moved from “zeroes to heroes.” This is our chance. We can also do it. We must see this crisis as the necessary disequilibrium required for serious actions and drastic change. We will not allow this opportunity to pass.
Having being appointed Minister and Chairman, National Sports Commission only two months to the Olympics, I have had to learn very quickly. And I have not received a better lesson than in the last two weeks of the London 2012 Olympics. I have learnt three key lessons from this Olympics:
*
1. Olympics medal is about hard cash. It is not a coincidence that the medals table appears to reflect the level of economic development of the countries. But having the resources is one thing, making the right strategic investment is another. Team Great Britain largely owes its dramatic success to what is described as “unprecedented financial investment” totaling up to more than 740 million GBP over 15 years. The current annual spending on sports stands at 100 million GBP. However, only 40% of this comes from the treasury, while the remaining 60% is lottery fund.
*
Conversely, Australia finished fourth in Sydney with 16 gold medals. In London, Australia has fallen outside the top 10 with 6 gold medals. Australians have blamed reduced funding for elite athletes and a lack of facilities at the grassroots levels.
*
2. Every medal is clearly projected and carefully planned for both in financial and technical terms over a sustained period of time. Only years of intensive, unrelenting training and preparation can win medals. There is no short cut. Medals are won by people who have worked hardest not by those who have prayed hard. We can only win medals by building systems that are capable of producing medalists and champions not by selecting athletes that we hope can win medals.
*
3. Olympics are a lifetime commitment. The champion is in the child. Ye Shiwen, the 16 year old Chinese girl that shocked the swimming world by setting a new world record in individual medley was only 12 when her country hosted the Olympics. Lizzie Armistead who won the Team GB’s first medal in this Olympics with Silver in cycling got her first bicycle at the age of 4.
*
The immediate challenge for us is how to translate these lessons into concrete actions in the days ahead. The process of rebuilding will start with the National Sports Festival in Lagos later this year. We shall use this event to flag-off our preparation for the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow and thereafter the 2016 Olympics in Brazil. Some of our top priorities in the days ahead are therefore as follows:
*
1. Identifying five sports that give us competitive opportunities.
2. Restructuring the Federations of these Sports to make them more democratic, accountable and efficient.
3. Developing a Sports Calendar that will ensure year-round sports activities both within and outside the schools.
4. Strategic engagement with the private sector with the aim to improve funding for sports.
5. Strengthen our coaching and training capabilities by developing strategic partnership with national and international bodies.
*
I thank all of you here for your support and understanding. We will keep this conversation going, in our belief that you in the media are our major strategic ally in the great task ahead. I want to say thank you to all my athletes and their coaches. They have all tried their best. Even though they have not won medals, many of them got to the quarter finals, the semifinals and finals of their various events and even setting new national, Africa and Commonwealth records in the process. But this is the Olympics, where micro-seconds have made the difference between gold medals and no medals. You are all our heroes and we can only hope to build on your achievements.
*
I thank the Federal Government and the people of Nigeria everywhere for their wonderful support and understanding during this difficult time. The task ahead has been made grimly clear. Therefore, lets get down to work.
*
By Bolaji Abdullahi
*

Read full article
Re: [Sports] Why Team Nigeria Failed at London Olympics
Ph3y posted on 08-11-2012, 12:47:18 PM


About two weeks ago, we arrived London for the 2012 Olympics with a contingent of 51 sportsmen and women competing in 8 sports namely, athletics, weightlifting, taekwondo, boxing, wrestling, table tennis, canoeing and basketball. We were competing in the last two for the first time ever.



alt



Even though we did not expect to win the competition, we had arrived hoping to make a decent showing. We even had reasons to believe we could surpass some of our recent achievements at this level of competing. Why not?





We had arrived London riding on the wave of a short but intensive preparation of our athletes in different parts of the world where they did not only have the benefits of high quality facilities and technical support but also had the opportunity to match up against some of the best athletes from other parts of the world, and on some occasions, beating them.





Many commentators agreed that while not ideal, we have had one of our best preparations coming into this competition in recent years. This, coupled with a system that put athletes’ welfare at the heart of planning and an atmosphere devoid of rancor and acrimony, we believed would guarantee us a couple of medals.





However, here we are, only a few days to the end of the competition. Team Nigeria is still not on the medals table. I must say this is as disappointing for my team and myself as it is for all Nigerians everywhere. But even as painful as this disappointment is, we must have the courage to see it for what it is. This, therefore, is a scientific diagnosis of our condition; a clear testimony to how far our sports have fallen behind.





We shall therefore not attempt any excuses or indulge in any unproductive blame game. Rather than see this as a failure, we must see it as an opportunity to rebuild. When other countries have found themselves in this kind of situation in the past, they have used the galvanizing power of disappointment to get down to work. At Atlanta 1996 Olympics, Team Great Britain won only one gold medal. Returning home, the right questions were asked, and the necessary actions were taken. Four years later in Sydney, they returned with 11 gold out of 28 medals. In Beijing four years ago, they returned with 19 gold medals out of 47, placing them in the fourth position. Today, Team GB is sitting pretty in the third position of the medals table surpassing their own expectation. Today, they are able to look back and say they have moved from “zeroes to heroes.” This is our chance. We can also do it. We must see this crisis as the necessary disequilibrium required for serious actions and drastic change. We will not allow this opportunity to pass.



Having being appointed Minister and Chairman, National Sports Commission only two months to the Olympics, I have had to learn very quickly. And I have not received a better lesson than in the last two weeks of the London 2012 Olympics. I have learnt three key lessons from this Olympics:





1. Olympics medal is about hard cash. It is not a coincidence that the medals table appears to reflect the level of economic development of the countries. But having the resources is one thing, making the right strategic investment is another. Team Great Britain largely owes its dramatic success to what is described as “unprecedented financial investment” totaling up to more than 740 million GBP over 15 years. The current annual spending on sports stands at 100 million GBP. However, only 40% of this comes from the treasury, while the remaining 60% is lottery fund.





Conversely, Australia finished fourth in Sydney with 16 gold medals. In London, Australia has fallen outside the top 10 with 6 gold medals. Australians have blamed reduced funding for elite athletes and a lack of facilities at the grassroots levels.





2. Every medal is clearly projected and carefully planned for both in financial and technical terms over a sustained period of time. Only years of intensive, unrelenting training and preparation can win medals. There is no short cut. Medals are won by people who have worked hardest not by those who have prayed hard. We can only win medals by building systems that are capable of producing medalists and champions not by selecting athletes that we hope can win medals.





3. Olympics are a lifetime commitment. The champion is in the child. Ye Shiwen, the 16 year old Chinese girl that shocked the swimming world by setting a new world record in individual medley was only 12 when her country hosted the Olympics. Lizzie Armistead who won the Team GB’s first medal in this Olympics with Silver in cycling got her first bicycle at the age of 4.





The immediate challenge for us is how to translate these lessons into concrete actions in the days ahead. The process of rebuilding will start with the National Sports Festival in Lagos later this year. We shall use this event to flag-off our preparation for the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow and thereafter the 2016 Olympics in Brazil. Some of our top priorities in the days ahead are therefore as follows:





1. Identifying five sports that give us competitive opportunities.



2. Restructuring the Federations of these Sports to make them more democratic, accountable and efficient.



3. Developing a Sports Calendar that will ensure year-round sports activities both within and outside the schools.



4. Strategic engagement with the private sector with the aim to improve funding for sports.



5. Strengthen our coaching and training capabilities by developing strategic partnership with national and international bodies.





I thank all of you here for your support and understanding. We will keep this conversation going, in our belief that you in the media are our major strategic ally in the great task ahead. I want to say thank you to all my athletes and their coaches. They have all tried their best. Even though they have not won medals, many of them got to the quarter finals, the semifinals and finals of their various events and even setting new national, Africa and Commonwealth records in the process. But this is the Olympics, where micro-seconds have made the difference between gold medals and no medals. You are all our heroes and we can only hope to build on your achievements.





I thank the Federal Government and the people of Nigeria everywhere for their wonderful support and understanding during this difficult time. The task ahead has been made grimly clear. Therefore, lets get down to work.





By Bolaji Abdullahi





..Read the full article
Re: Why Team Nigeria Failed at London Olympics
Olamide posted on 08-12-2012, 03:22:11 AM
The Nigerina contigent was 51 athletes but the MInister refused to mention the number of officials and their hanger-on who went on the jamboree with public funds wasted for nothing. The relays also showed that the Nigerian team did not practice together before the races as they were busy shopping in London. I watched the races and was convinced about the lack of practice because of the need to make visual contact during baton changes by the Nigerians. If you practice together as a team, baton changes comes effortlessly and this explains why the Nigerian teams were not able to pick any medals in the relays and not because the Americans and the Jamaicans were too good. Making visual contact during baton change means you miss three steps before you get back in full stride. Baton changes occurs thrice in a relay race and that means Nigeria lost 9 full strided during each race.
Look at the Jamaicans, Kenyans and Ethiopians, South Africans et al having their flags raised at the olympics while we never had the opportunity even once.
Re: Why Team Nigeria Failed at London Olympics
Olamide posted on 08-12-2012, 03:32:26 AM
The Minister lies about the 'hard cash' part. Jamaica does not spend a huge amount of money but nurtured the talents discovered. Our public officials should stop relying on ready-made athletes and focus on grassroots development which does not require huge cash to do. Provide facilities in schools and encourage the type of competitions we used to have in the 80s and 90s before everyone went mad. Activities must take place within the schools as most talents are discovered in schools. Private schools should mandatorily have sports fields. Most of them have no sporting facilities. Students sit and watch TV during lunch and go to felllowship after that. In my own days, lunch periods were times to play football games and race ourselves on the school field. I never saw a student with a pot belly then but they are very common now beacuse of lack of exercise.
Nigeria as a nation is becoming overweight and this is reflecting in our overall performance. MR. Minister, go back to the drawing board and start preparing for teh next Olympics from next week. you are already late as other countries have started preparing for the next Olympics since two years ago.
Re: [Sports] Why Team Nigeria Failed at London Olympics
Godwin posted on 08-12-2012, 11:36:11 AM
QUOTE:
I am sure he meant to say

QUOTE:
About two weeks ago, we (12 coaches, 29 administrators officers, 9 medical officials, 5 contingent officials and 6 secretariat officials.) arrived London for the 2012 Olympics with a contingent of 51 sportsmen and women competing in 8 sports namely, athletics, weightlifting, taekwondo, boxing, wrestling, table tennis, canoeing and basketball. We were competing in the last two for the first time ever.



Nigeria participated in Basketball @ 2004 Olympics with the women's team.
Re: [Sports] Why Team Nigeria Failed at London Olympics
Bode Eluyera posted on 08-15-2012, 09:42:40 AM
BOLAJI ABDULLAHI - MEDIOCRACY AT THE HIGHEST LEVEL!!!

SHAME NO DEY CATCH YOU BOKO HARAM MINISTER FOR SPORTS?!!!

NO MORE EXCUSE FOR MEDIOCRACY!!!

WE DEMAND THE RESIGNATION OF BOLAJI ABDULLAHI NOW!!!

JONATHAN BADLUCK SHOULD SACK BOLAJI ABDULLAHI WITH IMMEDIATE EFFECT!!!



@KaparaK, enyi, Olumide and others, thanks for your posts.

You have already pointed out some of the things I was planning to say. Personally, I am not surprised about the performance of the Nigerian team. However what is most embarrasing and insulting is the crap that this man that calls himself a minister wrote above! It's an insult on our intelligence!!! One of the major problems of that country called Nigeria is that it's being ruled at all levels by mediocres, opportunists and bandits - and Bolaji Abdullahi(or whatever he calls himself) just happens to be one of them. The same thing applies to those that Nigeria send out as diplomats and ambassadors to represent the country. They all lack the necessary knowledge, backgrounds, tools, skills and vision to carry out their responsibilities as expected. They are mainly clerks. I have had the opportunity to meet and interact with these bunch of opportunists, and I just could not help but weep for Nigeria and Nigerians. Like I wrote in one of my series titled "FREEDOM COALITION: $250M FUND TO ELECT MAJ. ABUBAKAR UMAR (RTD.) RIBADU AND AKUNYILI IN 2011 AND GET RID OF BABANGIDA, JONATHAN AND THE CABAL FOR GOOD! YES WE CAN! available at nigeriansinamerica.com, the brutal and protracted military regime in Nigeria have created a' big leadership vacuum.' This has resulted in a tragic sitiuation whereby mediocres and opportunists are now representing us as ministers, diplomats, ambassadors, governors, senators, members of house representatives etc. These people earn very high salaries for doing little or nothing! And even in most cases, they get paid for ruining our economy and making lives unbearable for us.

As a matter of fact, it's worth mentioning that those Nigerians (our basketballers, sprinters etc) that even managed to qualify for the Olympics are based abroad and did so mainly on their own merits without any inputs whatsoever from the Federal government. The hens, as they say, have finally come to roost(or maybe 'to get roasted' for Ramadan) for Nigeria. I have said it a million times that NIGERIA IS A FAILED STATE, THE BIGGEST BANANA REPUBLIC IN THE WORLD, A VERY SIK AND DOOMED COUNTRY. The woeful performance of our sportsmen(not due to their fault) at the 2012 London Olympics is another WATER-PROOF evidence that I am 100% right about Nigeria being a failed state. To be honest, personally, I am not surprised about the result. I expected it. It has already become a trend. In the 2011 World Athletics Championship, Nigeria performed woefully too. NO SINGLE MEDAL WAS WON BY THE BIG FOR NOTHING GIANT OF AFRICA - while countries like Kenya, Ethiopia, South Africa, Jamaica, Barbados, etc carted away medals. WE are already used to praying for miracles without doing anything. But, you just can not grow grass and expect to harvest cocoa. We are reaping the bad fruits of our labour. Imagine somebody who calls himself a minister and is not aware of the fact that Nigeria had already being represented earlier in basketball at the Olympics as far back as 2004. A minister can not even get some basic facts right!!! Na wa for una o mr. honourable minister!!!!!!

The poor sportsmen should not be blamed under any circumstances. They tried their best. Winning medals at the Olympics needs not only a lot of financing, but as well requires providing the necessary facilities for training, competent coaches, moral support, incentives and conducive enviroment. All the blame is on incompetent, corrupt, visionless and morally bankrupt Nigerian sports officials and federal government headed by a confused opportunist by name jonathan badluck. There are countless international sports events where the delegates/officials outnumber the sportsmen. These people are only after their pockets and not the glory of the country. Instead of training hard to represent the country in different sports, Boko Haram would rather murder innocent and armless Nigerians. That, I guess, is much easier and justifiable. This is one of the dearest prices that we are paying for the so called ONE NIGERIA - unfortunately!!!!

And Abdullahi(whose mother, I guess, is from one of the Boko Haram states) has the guts to write that rubbish. Here is a man saddled with the responsibiliy of preparing the Nigerian team for the Olympics and giving them all the necessary support to ensure that they perform very well and make the country proud. If Abdullahi lacked the necessary financial resources, he could had appreoached his boss, jonathan badluck, for funds. And he felt that he was not getting the necessary support, he should had reason from his post. However, Abdullahi, being a mediocre and another opportunist, decided to continue earning fat salaries for doing nothing and only remembered aboput the Olympics about 1-2 months to the opening date. Instead of making the necessary preparation, we were fed with superlative news on how Nigerian sportsmen would destroy their opponents.

The Olympics once again proved that our opportunistic and bandit leaders have different priorities like buying a new presidential jet and spending more than a third of the country's budget and oil revenues on maintainin a moribund house of representatives and senate. Imagine this Mobolaji Abdullahi having the audacity to tell us that the result of the Olympics is a reflection of the richness of the countries that topped the medals table! What a crap!! What an insult!!! Is Mobolaji Abfdullahi trying to tell us that countries like Kenya, Jamaica, Uganda, Iran, Bahamas, Ethiopia, Cuba etc are richer than Nigeria?!! Is Bolaji Abdullahi trying to tell us too that more than 90 countries that won medals in the London 2012 Olympics are all richer than Nigeria? Is this man in his right senses at all? In a normal country(it's an open secret that Nigeria is far from being normal), the most honourable thing for Bolaji Abdullahi to do was to tender his UNRESERVED APOLOGY to Nigerians for the woeful performance of Nigeria and follow it up with a letter of resignation and return all the salaries and benefits that he has received as the minister for sports. But, if Bolaji Abdullahi lacks the dignity and moral to do the right thing, then, my advise to his boss, jonathan badluck, is to sack Abdullahi and the chairman/head of the Nigerian Olympic committee, compell them to return all the salaries that they have received with immediate effect.

IT'S HIGH TIME WE TOLD THE BOLAJI ABDULLAHIS OF NIGERIA THAT WE ARE NOT GOING TO ACCEPT ANY MORE EXCUSE FOR MEDIOCRACY!!!

YOU EITHER PERFORM AND SHOW RESULT OR LEAVE AND RETURN ALL THE SLARIES - IF YOU HAVE A CONSCIENCE!!!



We must not are miss an historical moment that chance has offered us to get rid of the descendants of Usman Don Fodio for good! We must never allow the Hausa-Fulani to ride on our backs to Aso-rock. Our children and generations to come will never forgive us!!!


THERE WAS NEVER ONE NIGERIA!

THERE IS NO ONE NIGERIA NOW!

AND THERE WILL NEVER BE ONE NIGERIA IN THE NEXT 500 YEARS!

IT DIED COMPLETELY AND FINALLY WHEN CHIEF MOSHOOD ABIOLA, THE WINNER OF THE JUNE 12, 1992 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS WAS MURDERED IN PRISON BY NORTHERN MILITARY OFFICERS (WITH THE COLLABORATION AND APPROVAL OF THE AMERICAN, BRITISH AND FRENCH GOVERNMENTS)!

AT LEAST 80% OF NIGERIA'S PROBLEMS WERE CAUSED BY THE NORTH AND MILITARY!

THE NORTH HAVE BECOME PERPETUAL PARASITE, BURDEN AND CLOGS IN THE WHEEL OF PROGRESS TO THE SOUTH!!!

THEREFORE, GETTING RID OF THE PARASITIC NORTH WILL AUTOMATICALLY RESOLVE 80% OF OUR PROBLEMS IN THE SOUTH!!!

TIME HAS PROVED THAT A HAUSA-FULANI MAN CAN NEVER DEFEND THE INTERESTS(RIGHTS, PROPERTIES AND LIVES) OF NDIGBO NEITHER INSIDE NOR OUTSIDE NIGERIA! LET US STOP DECEIVING OURSELVES!

ALL ONE NIGERIA HAS GIVEN THE SOUTH SO FAR IS TRAGEDY, PAIN, TEARS AND SORROW!!!

LET US SAVE OUR CHILDREN, GRANDCHILDREN AND GENERATIONS TO COME FROM THE NIGHMARE CALLED ONE NIGERIA BY ENDING THE FORCED RELATION IMPOSED ON US BY THE BRITISH FOR THEIR OWN SELFISH POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC INTERESTS!!!

IF WE FAIL TO DO SO NOW, THEY WILL NEVER FORGIVE US!!!

WE ALL NEED OUR OWN PRESIDENTS, MINISTERS, AMBASSADORS, EMBASSIES, POLICE AND ARMY TO DEFEND OUR RIGHTS, PROPERTIES, LIVES AND INTERESTS - NIGERIA IS NOT CAPABLE OF DOING THAT FOR 52 YEARS!!!

LET US SAVE NIGERIANS AND NOT NIGERIA FROM COMPLETE DESTRUCTION BY INCOMPETENT, CORRUPT, VISIONLESS AND MORALLY BANKRUPT OPPORTUNISTS LIKE JONATHAN BADLUCK AND HIS COLLEAGUES BY BREAKING UP NIGERIA NOW!!!

TOMORROW MAY BE TOO LATE!!!

IF YOU LOVE YOUR CHILDREN, RELATIVES, FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES, DON'T EVER ALLOW THEM TO GO TO THE NORTH 'UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES' TO SERVE THE USELESS NYSC!! THEIR LIVES ARE MUCH MORE IMPORTANT!!! NIGERIA, A FAILED STATE, BIGGEST BANANA REPUBLIC IN THE WORLD, A VERY SICK AND DOOMED COUNTRY, IS NOT WORTH DYING FOR!!!

WE EXPECT ALL THE GOVERNORS AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF SOUTHERN STATES TO PASS A LAW THAT WILL PROHIBIT/BAN THEIR INDEGINES FROM GOING TO THE NORTH TO SERVE AS CORPERS IRRESPECTIVE OF WHATEVER GUARANTEE THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND NORTHERN GOVERNORS MIGHT MAKE!!! DON'T EVER TRUST THESE PEOPLE OR ENTRUST YOUR LIVES TO THEM!!! THEY ARE NOT RELIABLE!!!

AN ALLIANCE BETWEEN ACN AND CPC IS SUICIDE FOR ACN AND YORUBA RESPECTIVELY!!!

SENATOR CHRIS NGIGE AND GOVERNOR BABATUNDE FASHOLA OF LAGOS STATE ARE MORE THAN CAPABLE OF WINNING THE 2015 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS WITHOUT ANY ALLIANCE WITH MUHAMMODU BUHARI AND NASIR EL-RUFA'S MORIBUND CPC!!!

JONATHAN BADLUCK, STELLA ODUA, ALLISON MADUEKE HAVE MURDERED THEM AND KILLED THEIR DREAMS!!!! WHAT A
PITY!!!

My articles including "Oodua Republic:To Be Or Not To Be?", 'One Nigeria': To Be Or Not To Be?' and my latest series 'YORUBA ROONU DADA - RE: SALIHU LUKMAN'S OPEN LETTERS TO SEN. BOLA TINUBU, MUHAMMADU BUHARI; EL-RUFAI AND NDIGBOS' 2015 PRESIDENTIAL AGENDA' are available at nigeriansinamerica.com.

YOU ARE FREE TO REPUBLISH THIS POST ON YOUR BLOG, SOCIAL WEB SITES AND SEND IT TO FEMI FALANA,WOLE SOYINKA, BOLA TINUBU,RAUF AREGBESOLA, MUHAMMAD FAWEHINMI, JONATHAN BADLUCK, FRIENDS, COLLEAGUES, POLITICIANS, HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS, E.T.C. THANK YOU.


Re: [Sports] Why Team Nigeria Failed at London Olympics
Purple posted on 08-16-2012, 21:48:50 PM
Team Nigeria failed because of lack of serious preparation, period!
1
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